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  2. markbt73

    A little love for Parma

    Looking at those photos a little more closely, you can tell what car is underneath by the wheels on some of them. The '63 Corvette looks like it's on a Marui Hunter, and the Dodge Daytona and Pontiac GTO bodies look like an AYK (Buffalo, I think?). The Porsche 944, Dodge Charger, and Monte Carlo are on a Samurai, and the '36 Ford is on a Yokomo. And the '33 Ford wheels look suspiciously Hirobo-like... And obviously, the Tamiya ones are easy to spot.
  3. Ray_ve

    The "postman Brought Me" Thread

    More bearings came in, the full set for the Mugen Seiki Prime 12. So more car-stuff plans for this weekend!
  4. Juggular

    Powered Screw Drivers

    I am a believer of @Pintopower's method. Only for unscrewing. Never for tightening. Even when hand-tightening, I use his method of backing out a turn, feel the screw clicking on to the thread in the hole, and then tighten. Otherwise, I could cross-thread. For some reason, things @Juls1 recommended always worked out for me. This time, however, I must say, "aha! I beat you to it, because I bought mine like 8 years ago!" My older model Ryobi was $23 or so, not too expensive. My guestimation is that on the weakest setting, it might not screw all the way on 30-40% of Tamiya screws. On the strongest setting, it's still weaker than torquing hard with your hand. It's good for RC. But as I've said, I only use it to unscrew. Power tools lack the "feel." Power setting "4" on the Ryobi 4V could work fine for the Grasshopper, but I could hear the dreaded "CRACK" sound on a shell of the Blackfoot. If you do it by hand, you'd feel the resistance before it happens. If you crack it by hand, you learn how strong that resistance was for that type of plastic. You can learn from it and adjust. Power tools don't give you that feel. Also, even if you unscrew by hand, the screw can get very hot from the friction (usually M3 machine screws on tight holes, not tapping screws). Any faster, it could melt the plastic. My hand, on the other hand (I don't mean the left hand when I said 'on the other hand')--cannot melt anything but chocolates (ice creams too, but I stopped eating sugar anyway...).
  5. Superluminal

    Newb First Post - New Build Lancia 037 TA02S

    Yes I believe it does fit fine, Im pfetty sure I have the manta ray propshaft kit (as it came with the alloy motor mount too??) to use in a TA02SW Porsch GT2 - the short wheelbase is created by the orientation of the rear sus arms not the body tub.
  6. Today
  7. Baddon

    A little love for Parma

    I have a couple of there motors as well from way back when.
  8. Mokei Kagaku

    A little love for Parma

    Thanks for posting! Rather easy to see that the leaflet is from the "end of the neon era"!
  9. Mokei Kagaku

    A little love for Parma

    Good point! Back in the day, you could easily spot the difference between the models of the people who had the patience, skill and taste to make the model look good and......well......the others. And now that anyone can have a well working and goodlooking RTR model, I admittedly miss the reward of having put effort and time into getting the knowledge and skill to be able to make the models stand out. Maybe a bit snobbish of me, but then so be it! Also, there is a bit of nostalgia in the old bodies that Parma still offers and I have collected some of them, including some bought new in recent years. I especially love their bodies that originate from Jerobee with molds made around 50 years ago. Similarly, I keep buying copies of for instance old Bolink, SG, Mantua bodies, simply because the originals aren't around anymore. However, I don't see any excuse for Parma to keep on releasing bodies from brand new molds with details and proportions that were state of the art 30-40 years ago when almost every other manufacturer have bodies that are vastly superior in those respects. As a collector of static model kits, I also collect "crude" old kits, but when I build a model, I want the best kit available of the subject of choice. I know some modelers really like to build kits from for instance old Airfix and Revell kits although much better kits of the same subjects are now available, simply because they like the idea that the old kits take a lot more patience and skill to make them look decent. Considering that even the best modern kits considered "easy" to build also take extremely much time and quite some skill to make them look good, I personally don't see the temptation in struggling with poor old kits instead. And even for the best modelers, vintage Airfix and Revell kits (and others) are a real struggle indeed. Similarly, I'd rather paint and run the good Tamiya Brat or Ford F100 body instead of the Parma Brat or F100 body. Still miss the Parma Chenowth Frog, Frog Jumper, Stinger and Sly One though!
  10. Problemchild

    Comical Hornet WR02CB

    Well it needs some lube so Im going in ha ordered neon carrot orange to try and mask up and paint the roll bars internally (cheapest paint at £3.99 delivered) itll be the first attempt at masking up rather than relying on the stickers JJ
  11. markbt73

    Powered Screw Drivers

    Huh, it's strange to me that so many people use power screwdrivers on RC cars. I never have. I guess I've never seen a need to "speed up" work on them. And I'd never trust one to assemble something. Suddenly all the comments over the years about stripped holes and cracked plastic parts make sense... But then, I don't use an air wrench on 1:1 cars either, unless I just can't break a bolt loose any other way. And again, never for assembly.
  12. Juggernut

    Powered Screw Drivers

    Now that is cool! And very expensive!
  13. Mokei Kagaku

    Powered Screw Drivers

    By far the best electric screwdriver I've ever tried and excellent for working on Tamiya models. Not cheap, but in a direct comparison with the Bosch Ixo it wasn't difficult to understand why. If you can live without the Tamiya logo and get long JIS-bits separately, the screwdriver itself is a rebadged and recoloured Makita DF010D, which can be found for roughly 1/3 of the price. https://www.tamiya.com/english/products/74089screwdriver/index.htm
  14. a.w.k.

    A little love for Parma

    I do also like PARMA very much, had a lot of their bodies Back in the day... This is the 30th anniversary leaflet 1994 (Click on the Pic for better Resolution)
  15. WillyChang

    Powered Screw Drivers

    For RC workbench I don't like the pistol type, I prefer the baton style of screwdriver... which are getting impossible to find nowadays More importantly when off-power I want the bitchuck to stay put with the screwdriver body so I can handtighten the final amount. Any driver that lets the bitchuck able to be turned when torqued manually is useless for RC wrenching.
  16. Pteppic

    Powered Screw Drivers

    I also use a Bosch IXO, but with the torque adapter: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bosch-IXO-Torque-Setting-Adapter/dp/B00JZI0X50/ref=asc_df_B00JZI0X50/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=226606326869&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=6355538408912982800&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9045064&hvtargid=pla-420005322866&psc=1&th=1&psc=1 Have had problems with a previous electric driver getting plastic too hot, so tend to take my time and if possible rotate round the screws in each step to put all of them in part way before going back and finishing them off (or with the longer screws sometimes 3 or 4 times). But I also now do that if I use a normal screwdriver too just to be on the safe side.
  17. Nicadraus

    Powered Screw Drivers

    I've been using the Bosch IXO since 2009. Always been happy with it, never had a problem and still works great until now.
  18. WillyChang

    A little love for Parma

    Dahms & Frewer too
  19. markbt73

    A little love for Parma

    I miss those days. Nothing was computer-designed, everything needed some hand-fitting to work right, in some cases you actually had to bring your car into the shop and hold it up to the bodies to see if it would fit. And, with very few exceptions, the answer was "yes... sort of." You just had to get the right "Body Mount Kit" for your car (usually just really long body posts and maybe some L-brackets or something). And you had to give them credit for proliferation. Parma (and Bolink and McAllister and MRP) were churning out new body styles every month, all sorts of cars, and there was surprisingly little overlap between what each manufacturer chose to make. The chances of your buddy showing up with the same body as you were very slim. And even if he did, because it took some effort to paint and trim and mount, they didn't look the same anyway. Unlike today's carbon-copy RTRs... Sure, the detail wasn't great, but you could always tell what they were, and with a little effort put into the paint, they looked pretty good. And at only $20 each or so, if you got bored with your Hornet being a '65 Mustang, you could change it to a Baja Beetle with a little allowance money. Calling them "crude" and "badly proportioned" is sort of missing the point and losing the perspective. There was a lot more "hobby" in hobby shops back then than there is now. And I think in general we're worse off for it.
  20. Juggernut

    Powered Screw Drivers

    I'm with you as I've never felt the need for one until I started removing the first few (of dozens) tapping screws I may never actually use one to install screws though. Especially if f I can't find one with a low enough torque setting where I don't have to worry about eyeballing the screw and stopping right before it gets snug.
  21. You are right in the thick of a number of good tracks there. Shame you weren't asking a few years back then Iconic RC were arranging bashes. On your doorstep you have Bingham Model Raceway, A1 Racing Club (Grantham), Broxtowe Model Car Club and (a little further afield) Robin Hood Raceway, all of which have current or former association with Iconic RC events and therefore might be interested in hosting an open bash. Some of the best events I went to were the Iconic bashes at Broxtowe. It has both tarmac and astro tracks. Around 30 of us spending the entire day bashing our favourite Tamiyas around the tracks. No racing, no timing, no organisation, unless you count the 20-or-so wheelie cars that had an untimed "race" on the tarmac track at lunchtime. As Wooders has mentioned, Tamiya Junkies run a meeting once a month at Robin Hood Raceway. They have the benefit of indoor and outdoor astro tracks so if it's raining you can get some respite in the barn. It's a little too far for me (5 hours each way) so I've only been once, but I'd go every month if I lived in Leicester. I absolutely love what those guys heve done. If you want to arrange something yourself, get in touch with Broxtowe, A1 or Bingham and ask if they'd be willing to open the track for an open day. They might dictate that every driver needs to have BRCA membership, or they might have an arrangement for people new to RC. They might want money up-front for the track (which you would have to pay and try to recover by charging people who attend) or they might be willing to charge an entry fee directly to drivers,which would protect you in the event nobody shows. I'm trying to arrange exactly this with a track down in the south-west. You might PM Tamiya Monkey on here, I think he organises the Tamiya Junkies meets and was pretty helpful when I was asking him how he got it off the ground. Also keep an eye on the Iconic RC calendar on Facebook. It's racing rather than bashing, but it's all vintage and lots of it is close to your area. The Iconic Revival (2 days of vintage buggy racing) takes place on the last weekend of July at Bingham Model Raceway - it's probably fully booked now but I'm sure you'd be welcome to come along to spectate. Drop me a PM if you're attending. The Banzai Challenge is in September, I think that's also at BMR, and is a vintage Japanese buggy event. I'm not sure if entries are open yet so you might get a drive there if you have an eligible buggy and fancy some vintage racing fun.
  22. Hi has anyone got one of the above boxes and also manual
  23. Hello everyone, This is my third Tamiya build after The Frog re-re and a Lancia Integrale TT-02. I've had this 58654 waiting to be built for months but just no time to do it - until now! Just building up the rear ball diff is a much higher level and more interesting build than I remember either the frog or TT02 being. I have a Sports Tuned motor and metal bearings ready for the build and I have had a good read through a couple of other more experienced builders threads. As you'd expect there are still a couple of questions that I have in my head and I'd like to call upon your experience and/or opinions. 1 - Pinion Thoughts for the Sports Tuned motor in a TA02S for light gravel driving? 2 - Upgrade to Propshaft and Motor mount, does the Manta Ray 47373 kit fit the SWB version of the TA02? Or are there better choices? I don't really have a massive budge for this build as we're about to move house! Thanks in Advance. Brendan
  24. Mad Ax

    Powered Screw Drivers

    I have a very cheap Performance Power screwdriver from B&Q. I think it was < £10. I never use it for RC builds, firstly because I have no JIS bits and secondly because I don't really see the point. Even with slightly arthritic fingers, the majority of screws don't give me any trouble. Unless you're racing to complete a car for a build-and-drive event, why rush? Use a hand-held screwdriver and feel what the plastic is doing. The main RC-related thing I do use it for is link screws in my custom-built crawlers. Screwing 30mm of M3 machine screw in and out of 10mm delrin plate is tough on the fingers and wrists but my cheapie B&Q jobbie does it flawlessly. I also use it for drilling plastic. It's a single speed driver and it's very slow, way slower than my cordless electric drill at its slowest speed, and it's also much, much lighter, and therefore easier to control. I have 2mm, 2.5mm and 3mm drill bits on hexes so I can plug-and-play without a chuck. For plasticard sheel, styrene mouldings, lexan and ABS bodies, which tend to melt if drilled too fast and/or are too small or flexible to clamp to a surface, the hand-held is the perfect too for a semi-precise hole. If I need real precision I use the bench drill, but it can be a little too fast for plastic and probably isn't quite as precise as it was when it was made 60+ years ago. The chuck has a bit of a wobble and it vibrates from having an ancient drive belt left installed while it was dry-stored for a while after its former owner passed away.
  25. Mad Ax

    A little love for Parma

    I always loved what Parma offered. I know their bodies were never as neat and tidy as Tamiya but they had some great options for buggies. Not sure if the bodies are still as easy to get in the UK as they once were. I think my LHS might even have stocked some Parma monster truck bodies back in the early 90s, I remember buying a new lexan shell for a (much) used King Cab chassis that I got from my cousin and it had the look and feel of Parma. Thanks for sharing
  26. Juggernut

    Powered Screw Drivers

    With my Dewalt drill. This small gun I got is 200/400 rpm. At 200 rpm, it shouldn't be an issue? I'd love to find a small, cheap, variable speed drill but, as far as I can tell, they don't exist.
  27. speedy_w_beans

    Powered Screw Drivers

    Do you ever run into issues with screws getting hot and melting the plastic, making the holes loose? Even hand-tightening some screws with a ratcheting screwdriver I've felt the plastic go soft before, so I've slowed down my fastener removals and installations. This seems to be an issue with certain plastics more than others.
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