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sosidge

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About sosidge

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  • Birthday 02/04/1976

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  1. Have to say I find this whole battery/ESC malarkey a bit of a headscratcher. I'm surprised there are so few direct replacement battery packs out there for the (hard to find and overpriced) Tamiya LF pack. And I don't really want a loose-fitting soft-cased Lipo pack in there. And then you have the ESC issue where Tamiya's own ESCs have a LiFe cutoff rather than a LiPo one! Might go down the route of 4x NiMH AA's in the holder and a Hobbywing 1625 to start with. But why no battery holder in the box Tamiya? And why is it such an expensive spare part? The car looks so "cool" though. Probably only usable on a flat surface, but steering wheelies (after option parts)...
  2. It depends on your perspective of technically interesting. Most modern race kits are exceptionally refined. So if you appreciate that refinement, precision and adjustability, then you will enjoy the build - but really they are built to be raced rather than displayed. Broadly speaking they are straightforward to build as a result of that refinement. If you look at the older kits, what I personally find technically interesting about them is the rawness of the engineering - many of those older cars came from an era where the hobby was experimenting with a lot of ideas, most of which were cast aside over time due to the level of complexity and the impact on reliability. The Avante is probably the archetypal example of this from RC buggy history. Tamiya used their huge resources to build a revolutionary car for racing. The car was innovative, unique, complicated and a total failure - it swiftly developed into the much simpler Egress and the Egress was then replaced by the Manta Ray that you already mentioned (which was even simpler yet faster straight away). I would be wary of the modern non-race buggy kits as you will find that the parts quality suffers and they are not quite as satisfying to build.
  3. Modern cars are TA05 onwards (belt) and TB03 onwards (shaft) which use the same suspension as the race cars. TT-01/2 is the beginners level chassis and are very different. You also have curiosities like the XV-01 and FF-03. Then there are the TRF and TB Evo cars, TRF416 onwards will fit LiPo and TB Evo 3 onward use the "modern" suspension. The TA06 and TB04 are the newest mid-range cars but their designs are rather unconventional and the jury is out on whether they are any better than the TA05 or TB03. I don't personally think any of the Tamiya's are well suited to hot motors when they aren't on a race track. They are best suited to stock motors and enjoying the looks, the engineering and the driving experience.
  4. You are much better off with allen drivers instead of allen keys. For the harder plastics, buy a 3mm tapping tool. Using a little grease on the screw can help too.
  5. The bleed holes are one way of adjusting the amount of oil in the shocks but I have personally never found them to be much help. Most consistent for me is to fill the shocks so they are just below the brim.
  6. American tracks tend to be the "supercross" style with lots of jumps. How you line the car up for the jumps is the key skill otherwise you won't get around. UK tracks tend to have fewer obstacles and are more about the racing line. That layout you posted was, to my mind, far too difficult for the drivers to navigate, especially in the first section, those sharp peaks on the jumps were flipping anyone who landed it wrong, and the track itself was a bit narrow for the SC trucks. But that is is the way some people like it! I don't believe that the tracks are deliberately laid to damage the cars and keep the shop running. You'll quickly lose the racers if they think they are being ripped off. Drivers make mistakes, cars crash, and sometimes they break. It's part of racing. The better you get at driving, the less you crash, the less you break, and the faster your times - that's what (most) people at the track are aiming for.
  7. First of all, RC racing is NON CONTACT (except for dedicated banger classes). I does seem that Short Course races have a tendency to degenerate into deliberate contact, but that it a problem with the drivers and the organisers, not RC racing in general. RC racing as it should be done is clean, fast and satisfying. It's a shame that your experience was negative. It doesn't have to be that way. Unfortunately, different clubs are run in different ways. I've been to clubs where I cannot stand the slack organisation and poor driving standards - equally, there are people who come to the clubs I race at who mistake the serious approach to racing for an intimidating one.
  8. Have you been to the BRCA website? I believe that had a club list buried somewhere. Or, Schumacher's website has an interactive map of clubs - http://www.racing-cars.com/sitepage/uk_rc_clubs.html
  9. Almost every brushed rebuildable motor was made in Japan. Tuners worldwide would buy them in and wind/relabel them. Probabaly most of the sealed can motors were as well until about 10 years ago when manufacture would have been moved to cheaper economies. Were you looking for Japanese brands in particular? For example, I think I have a Yokomo branded modified in the garage.
  10. Dean, you are massively, massively undergeared. Why aren't you asking me (or some of the other competitive blinky runners) these questions at the track? For the CWIC, you need to be starting around 4.0:1, for the club track, more like 4.5:1. To get that kind of ratio you will need to change your spur - its worth switching to a non-Tamiya 48dp spur and pinion because there are more sizes available. Ian@MMR can probably help you find one with the right fitting for the TA06. You were way off the pace yesterday, but you don't need to be if you just ask for a little help in getting the car prepared. Same with your Mini. Dave
  11. I see now that you intended to measure the camber with the red plate rather than the black one... now the design makes a lot more sense to me!
  12. Well, standing upright is one of the problems, but I had assumed you had intended to use it hand-held anyway. The flaws are mainly related to the consistency of measurement you will acheive by clamping pieces with a single nut, and by having the pivot so far away from the wheel. I don't think you can measure negative camber either with the parts as pictured. I reckon you have at least one plate and one pivot more than you need to fulfil the design criteria. In fact, I have a tool that will measure three different camber angles and a range of ride heights with no moving parts at all!
  13. First of all, let me say how great it is to see your enthusiasm for using your skills and education to make your own things. Secondly, let me say that your design appears to have a couple of flaws. I'm sure you'll notice them in the prototyping stage!
  14. Easier to buy those parts with a 5-digit number. #53969 are what I use where you need a longer connector. Or you can take out the plastic spacers, but then the shocks are at quite an extreme angle.
  15. Sounds like you had a good day. To finish as well as you did at your first race meeting is impressive, you should be proud. Good to hear that the other racers went out of their way to help.
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