JennyMo

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Everything posted by JennyMo

  1. To start one new complicated project is unfortunate, to start two looks like carelessness... but here we go! I wanted to wait until I'd got the wheelbase sorted (which I did this afternoon) before starting this new build thread, to give an actual visual outline - rather than simply a stack of random parts! photo. Yes, that is yet another Ebay aluminium chassis - approximately the dimensions of a Trailfinder 2 or Gelande from RC4WD. Having had a lot of fun building a leaf-sprung chassis for the YJ Jeep recently (and been surprised how capable it is too), I was inspired to build another leafer - this time based on the classic Tamiya Toyota HiLux / Bruiser / Mountaineer, and not least Trailfinder 2 derivative that is ubiquitous in the scale RC scene these days. Now I realise there really is nothing new under the sun when it comes to a HiLux based build - although that said, I'm not sure I can recall anyone taking this particular approach (off-road ability seeming the main motivation for this kind of build), and I trust the combination of specification and detailing is going to make this unique. I was also further inspired by @Grastens build of the Tamiya Bruiser recently - not only that he chose the pukka Tamiya kit rather than the cheaper RTR copy that is available these days, but fundamentally as he splashed out on the really nice step-side rear body from Loops (in the Czech Republic) as a homage to the original Tamiya 3-speed HiLux Pick-up (#58028) - a body style which I've always had a soft-spot for myself, not least the 1953 F100 Midnight Pumpkin which I built the STUMPkin and Ta'Mater in my showroom around. In fact, if you follow the link above to Ta'Mater, you might see where I'm going with this... Fundamentally, rather than build a typical 4X4 version - using the myriad of optional parts out there already of course - I thought I'd build a more 'lowly' 2WD pick-up version, albeit like Mater with dually rear wheels inside those step-side arches. Being 2WD, there would also be no need to have the vehicle jacked sky-high, rather mount the axles over the springs (leaf under axle) helping to reduce the overall ride-height, at the expense of some overall travel of course. With that decided, I also felt that it would be feasible to make this my most scale realistic build yet - not just the leaf-sprung chassis, but with shackles, U-bolts, a rusted busted body (as is my way typically) and finished with a host of scale detailing - be that scratch built, or available both off-the-shelf and 3D printed from various modellers and retailers online. However, while I've been keen to get the basic vehicle on it's wheels as soon as possible, this is not going to be a quick build I fear - as I've kind of blown my budget recently on the YJ and upgrades for my other crawlers, plus invested pretty heavily already in parts for the Baja Beetle too, which is really starting to take shape now I've ironed out one or two fundamental stumbling blocks regarding the transmission and rear suspension... sorry, see how easy it is to get distracted when you have more than one project on the go at the same time?! cont.
  2. JennyMo

    Is this real? GF01 Monster Beetle...

    Here is my two cents on the subject - I certainly agree with much of what's already been said in this thread, and I've posted before (on an MST chassis based build thread as I recall) that it is kind of ironic that Tamiya has the longest history of producing the most detailed and scale hard-bodies (along with all their other static kits of course), and yet they don't seem to have capitalised on that at all really - despite the explosion in interest in 'scale' models/crawlers from other manufacturers, which are increasingly designed specifically to appeal to a market segment that clearly has a lot of money to spend. As has been mentioned above, Tamiya also have one of the largest and most varied parts-bins available too, so I cannot see why they couldn't create a simple twin-rail chassis based platform (essentially in a 'builders kit' format) that utilises various wishbone/axle/shock combinations from their extensive parts-bin, and which offers an adjustable or/or range of wheelbase options - so it can be easily paired with their current range of scale hardbodies which continue in production (and others that could be re-introduced and/or added). After all, they essentially already have that concept with the MF-01 chassis for more road-biased vehicles (and to a more specific degree the TRF chassis for club racing) - so introducing a more off-road performance oriented twin-rail 'scale' style chassis (like the Axail SCX10 etc.) would require very little extra R&D; and as long as it matched the Axial OEM specification (ie. a mix of plastic cross braces and metal rails to help keep the initial cost affordable, together with a series of hop-up options in full metal perhaps), I can't see why people wouldn't start to build around a similar Tamiya chassis instead - particularly if the kits came paired with a fully detailed hard-body already. While I also ended my previous pontification with the assertion that actually, not every manufacturer has to cover every single market segment - and that in more recent years it would appear that Tamiya have decided to focus on the basher/club-racer/entry level market more perhaps (presumably still the biggest RC segment in Japan?); at the same time they clearly also know the value of their heritage with the higher-end/higher-priced ReRe of the SRB and 3-Speed kits too. So personally I can't see why they couldn't also capitalise on their own history further, with essentially a 'heritage' range of more detailed and labour intensive builders kits to appeal to the more monied middle-aged market too? Jenny x
  3. JennyMo

    Kamtec oval window Beetle body

    To be fair, I think Kamtec are using the word 'Tamiya' as a keyword in their Ebay/online listing, rather than it being an actual replica of a specific model shell? It looks to me like it could have been made from a mould taken from the Lexan Tamiya Beetle body, then they added the more pronounced headlight detail and an oval rear window themselves? Either way, I reckon that could be an excellent basis for a custom project - in fact I've had my eye on the same [ABS version] myself for years! Jenny x
  4. JennyMo

    The "postman Brought Me" Thread

    Thanks Mongoose - you know me, it will a twist on the usual... there is a build thread here [which is starting to describe the concept] if you've not seen it: Jenny x
  5. Hi NJM' - firstly, a personal thank you for letting me 'borrow' your photo from the archives (I ought to have PM'd you first, but trust you appreciate the context within which I wanted to use it anyway), let's see if I can shed some light on your questions: 1. I would say that the [104mm] truck springs are actually slightly stiffer than the [115mm] RC4WD springs, although it could just be down to the shorter length of course - they are not appreciably softer though if that is what you're looking for. That said, I'm currently using two leafs on the front, if you ran just single leaf you might find they correspondingly softer? I'd say they are a 'medium' weight - in that they ought to support the weight of the motor/servo etc in the metal chassis without sagging too much once the build is complete. I'm not sure if someone does manufacture 'soft' springs for the 1/14th scale trucks? 2. As far as I can tell, the centre of each spring saddle [ie. the centre of the two holes] on the 'Yota' scale axles are 78mm width, but with leaf springs and shackles there is a degree of jiggle of course. (I measured my chassis rails at 79mm centres for example). However, if the Tamiya chassis rails are 76mm centres, you might find the Yota axles a touch too wide to line up (unless you grind off the spring saddles and use the Bruiser U bolts of course) - alternatively I imagine you could space the shackles a mm or so wider if required? 3. I'm sorry I can't confirm the gearing of my [copy] axles, but according to RC4WD, the diff ratio is 2.67:1, and I imagine mine are the same as they look to be a direct copy/made in the same factory as the RC4WD version. How does that compare to the Bruiser diff ratio? I'm not completely up to speed with the under-drive/over-drive set-ups some people use for crawling, but presumably they use a slightly higher or lower ratio in each axle so that the front is pulling slightly more or less depending on what they want. Not sure how that is going to work handling/transmission wind-up wise on hard-surfaces or trail running, but I think I can see the benefit of having the front axle rotating slightly faster than the rear when climbing on loose terrain for example? 4. Yes, those 1/14th Truck shocks are cute aren't they? - and the upper body is just 8mm diameter, so very scale. These Hot Racing ones do come with internal springs (which are very soft to be honest) and currently I've left them in - although I may well take them out during the final assembly to see if the suspension is appreciably softer or not. The are not 'oil filled' as such, but do have a trace of oil in for lubrication presumably. 5. Sorry, no Bruiser wheels here (I do love them though!), but I can tell you the PCD of the Tamiya 1/14th Truck wheels appears to be 17.5mm, so pretty much exactly the same as a SLW 6-bolt hub pattern that Vanquish & Locked-Up RC etc. use. Hope that helps! Jenny x
  6. JennyMo

    So, What Have You Done Today?

    Replaced the lost wheel-nut from yesterday, but decided that it looks so much better with some genuine crud left on the tyres! Jx
  7. OK, here we go again... another winter project to keep me busy! If you've followed my content/build-threads on here in recent years, you'll know that increasingly I've moved away from traditional Tamiya kit based builds, and more into the realm of scale and scratch-built projects - albeit hopefully with a nod at least [and degree of parts] from the Tamiya stable. I've also really got into driving crawlers - my own ongoing project, a 4-wheel-steer narrowed Hilux truggy: "Desmond the 2.2" (build thread in the Monster-trucks and Crawlers section), and the Land Rover Defender 90 I built for Lisa: "OK TC" (thread here in The Builds section) - so for this latest 4WD project, I thought I'd mix things up again and build a classic Jeep Wranger (using the excellent Tamiya YJ hardbody shell of course), but on a proper scale leaf-sprung chassis - hence the AKA title of this thread. Rather than build a monster off-roader that is geared towards off-road and crawling performance (like Desmond and the TC), I imagine using leaf springs is naturally going to limit the outright crawling ability of this new rig - although I'll still do what I can to give it the best performance possible of course... So instead I plan to go super scale with this one - detail much as I did with the Defender build (weathering, scale accessories and other typical 1:1 touches), and fundamentally, try to get the underpinnings accurate, and hide all traces of the RC gear that actually motivates this beast. It will be an ongoing project - details added as and when I get inspiration (whether we'll see another animated drive for example, I'm not quite sure yet), but I'll start this thread off with a look at the fundamentals below... photo. That's quite the stash of parts already Ozzy, what are we going to do with them? Part 1: Chassis As with my previous crawler builds, I decided to utilise a Trailfinder/Gelande style ladder chassis kit - the kind you find on ebay for less than £30 typically - and which can be adapted to mount either multi-link radius arms, or traditional leaf springs. photo. Scale 'Yota' style axles - very nicely made I have to say, although do check the bolts that hold on the diff-covers, and apply thread-lock. photo. The axles came with 4-link brackets attached, they are simple to remove if you want to fit leaf springs instead... photo. ...which is exactly what I did! note. the cast blocks on the axle case line up directly with the chassis rails above when using leaf-springs. It's also worth noting that the springs come with 4 separate leaves as standard, and seem very stiff. I removed the 2nd shortest leaf (which seemed to have the most arch to it) and reassembled them - although it may be that ultimately I only run two leaves for maximum articulation. photo. the hardware with the chassis kit allows you to mount the leaf-springs and shackles with the suppled bolts. note. these are not the genuine RC4WD springs and hardware (but the Chinese ebay version) - and the shackles themselves are actually much longer than the pukka RC4WD Trailfinder ones, plus the bolts that mount the springs to the shackles are regular M3 screws, and not stepped/shanked, so there is quite a lot of play in there... Whether they've done that as simply a cost-cutting measure or specifically a benefit to articulation I'll have to see - but I've gone ahead and ordered the pukka shackle and hardware kit from RC4WD now too. photo. Ozzy likes how things are coming together so far... although he too is concerned about how much lift the chassis has on those extra-long spring shackles. photo. the axles in place - using leaf-springs and their natural mounting location/s on the chassis is very much going to dictate/fix the wheelbase of this build. I was aware that in using the regular 'Tralifinder' length chassis would mean the wheelbase would be too long for the Tamiya YJ Wranger shell... currently as it stands the axle to axle length is around 265mm - so approximately 25mm/an inch (so nearly a foot in 1:1 scale) longer than the current* wheel-arches on the body. *I say current, because if you saw my Rat-Brat build, then you probably know what I'm going to do already... ;o) Rather than shorten the chassis or wheelbase, my plan is to simply extend the rear of the bodywork to fit the existing rails and wheelbase... in that regard the hard-top would also need to be stretched, although to keep things simple (and arguable more scale), I'm actually going to remove the hard-top anyway and make this an open pick-up style vehicle - maximising the opportunity for a scale interior, and not least as a homage to the Wild Willy too of course! Stay tuned! Jenny x
  8. JennyMo

    ebaYJeep - aka. "Daydream B'leafer"

    Yep - although they were ny-locs, they had probably been on and off one too many times... blue thread-lock in future - on all four wheels! Jx
  9. JennyMo

    ebaYJeep - aka. "Daydream B'leafer"

    Tools - check. Fully charged batteries (x2) - check. GoPro - check. Spare wheel nuts just in case... photo. ...ah. Best carry some spares next time I think - at least I got some video before I lost a wheel-nut somewhere in all that goop! More soon! Jx
  10. JennyMo

    The "postman Brought Me" Thread

    Dashing! I admit I then got slightly distracted from my wheel-arch widening to check the dash and bulkhead would fit in front of the gearbox. It does! Jenny x
  11. Ah, and then I got distracted for a moment... I know I said I wasn't going to think about an interior just yet, but with the motor and gearbox (and servo in the post), I thought it prudent to make sure everything would ultimately fit together before any exterior painting started... That's my excuse anyway ;o) Jx
  12. Bodybuilding... (this episode brought to you by Araldite and Isopon P38) Ideally the vertical faces of the rear aches would be approximately 12mm further out than originally - proving sufficient coverage for the dual rear tyres to be considered 'legal' but at the same time, having just a bit of that tread poking out to emphasise the wider rear end. photo. mocking up with trusty cereal packets and tape! Once I'd mocked up the arches, I realised that if the extension/in-fill was to follow the original angles of the initial arch (bearing in mind that the HiLux step-side box arches have essential three profiles - almost flat (but slightly tapered), then a 45° chamfer, then an essentially vertical face, with a lip arch too of course) - then the 45° chamfer would have to be trimmed by about 5mm so that everything mated up with the arches at the original height to the rest of the bed... photo. The result was a series of bracing panels (1mm styrene) along each flat face - 17mm further out, which allowed the trimmed vertical arches to sit over the top at the correct width... photo. arches initially tacked in place with super-glue gel - the outer arch just sits on the edge of the [internal] bracing panels. With the arches reattached, all I had to do now was cut some more strips of styrene (1.5mm thick) to make a sandwich and fill in the gap between the top of the original wheel-arch boxes, and the new outer lip. photo. It's going to make quite a difference! Once the filler strips were cut and tacked in place with more super-glue, I then beefed everything up with a liberal application of Araldite inside - the rapid set stuff I brought from the UK with me. photo. this rear bed is already a heavy moulding, it weighs a tonne now with all that extra glue and plastic - super strong though of course. I used Araldite to initially fill in corners of each wheel-arch box, which could then be sanded smooth on the outside to replicate the original curve and radius. Similarly any remaining gaps were filled with Isopon P38 before the initial shaping with the Dremel sanding drum, followed by some 240 grit wet&dry paper. photo. After the first filler session - it's getting there already... More soon! Jenny x
  13. JennyMo

    ebaYJeep - aka. "Daydream B'leafer"

    cont. Some more detail shots: photo. RC4WD Warn 8274 working winch with wireless remote control - strong enough to lift the whole car vertically off the ground! photo. Ozzy Osbourne figure modified to fit Axial Racing Corbeau seat (with Yeah Racing belts) - sweat-pants repainted as dirty jeans, and tattoo's removed! (he had a bit of a haircut too ;o) photo. foam padding around roof-rack/cage bars, RC4WD working HiLift jack secured to scuttle (with quick-release R clips). And finally, with the lights on! photo. Yeah Racing scale checker-plate (4 bar design) along sills, OME (Old Man Emu) scale shocks, metal tube fenders at the front and grab rails along rear body. photo. RC4WD white 8-spokes, 115mm tyres Maxxis style tyres and scale brake discs all round. photo. Stinger style front bumper (modified), and RC4WD LED lighting kit. The good news is, I have a backpack this just fits in - so I'm going hunting for some trail scenery soon! Jenny x
  14. JennyMo

    ebaYJeep - aka. "Daydream B'leafer"

    A few more photos with the cage installed: photo. Ozzy looks worried... he shouldn't be, this is pretty well sorted now! photo. Tamiya YJ body stretched behind the doors to fit longer Trailfinder 2 wheelbase leaf-sprung chassis. photo. custom wooden deck in load-bed covered with junk and accessories now! Plus more accessories! photo. full interior, with checker-plate floor and door panels - there are two 6-cell stick packs hidden under there too (one for the motor and one for the winch). photo. a mix of ProLine workshop accessories, 3D printed milk-crates, Yeah Racing scale cardboard box and scratch build shop towels, rags and grinding wheels (that is real old engine oil too!) photo. a fully stocked ARB fridge in the centre console - beer, whiskey and vodka! cont.
  15. JennyMo

    WR02C Sandscorcher

    Ha - I knew I'd seen that profile somewhere, I was thinking a Trabant or something, but you're spot on there ;o) Jx
  16. JennyMo

    WR02C Sandscorcher

    I do think a Comical Scorcher would be a great addition to the range (and almost inevitable I would think?) - and I particularly like how the one max69vk posted has ‘56’ rather than ‘506’ as the door number because it’s so short! In fact if the cabin was just a little less gawky shaped, I think I’d be temped by one of those myself! Jx
  17. JennyMo

    WR02C Sandscorcher

    Ahem. Lest we forget ;o) https://www.tamiyaclub.com/showroom_model.asp?cid=130097&id=25648 Jx
  18. JennyMo

    Rough Rider Bruiser Wild Willy SJ30

    Blissard - please tell me/us more about that gearbox you're using, as I was looking to do something similar for my mid-engine Beetle build. Jenny x
  19. JennyMo

    Rough Rider Bruiser Wild Willy SJ30

    Ha ha - me too! What a crazy mash-up! - I love it! Jx
  20. JennyMo

    So, What Have You Done Today?

    I took the Dremel to a perfectly lovely (and expensive!) rear step-side body this afternoon! ...to extend the rear aches to cover the dually rear wheels, and to incorporate a working folding tailgate! Jx
  21. JennyMo

    The "postman Brought Me" Thread

    Some lovely scale chassis hardware (M3 size) from Locked-Up RC: Of course most of it won't be seen once the body is fitted to Cilla... Jenny x
  22. Ok, just for you Kevin - a little taster of what's to come... photo. patience required, but ultimately pays off - scoring the bonnet creases with a Stanley knife eventually gives a nice clean cut. photo. removing the bonnet completely (for now) will allow me to construct a complete engine bay... At the rear, the arches needed to be cut off, so I could create an infill panel to extend them to cover the dually wheels: photo. I started by scoring with a knife inside, but ultimately resorted to the Dremel, with a thin cut-off wheel for the neatest cut. note. Having refitted the shell to the chassis, while the outside edge of the tyres is technically 30mm wider than the original body (ie. requiring an infill of 15mm per side), I think it actually looks better with just 12mm per side - so that's what it will be. Since I was on a roll, I also let Dr Dremel do some damage at the rear end too: The plan here being to re-attach the tailgate with actual working hinges - so that I can run with it up or down (or even half-way up with chains) as required. More soon! Jenny x
  23. Before chopping the body around there was one completely new part I had to fabricate first - a panel to support the front bumper underneath the alternative round headlight Bruiser style grille I'd ordered... While the regular Trailfinder 2 kit (with square headlights) has a complete front panel that screws into the holes either side on the front wheel-arches, the Marlin Crawler edition which uses this alternative grille doesn't feature a traditional bumper, rather uses a higher tube-bumper instead, and you cut off the leading edges of the wheel-arches to suit. So it was out with the CAD (cardboard aided design), to cut a suitable panel to tie the two chrome sections together: I knew it would be a tight squeeze in front of the chassis cross-member, and it was: So ultimately I cut off the front lip of the cross-member (as I did with the YJ Jeep build to mount the winch-bumper as far back as I could)... Giving a valuable 2-3mm clearance for the new panel behind the grille assembly: photo. note I have also cut some dedicated spacers for the front axles so the narrow wheels/tyres fill the arches better. While all this was going on earlier today, the postman also delivered some scale hardware from Locked-Up RC, including these lovely M2 acorn wheel-nuts - so I set about making my own wheel-studs using cut-down M2 screws (of which I've got dozens with the various hand-rails and shackles I've ordered over the years): And finally, I couldn't resist adding these to my order: photo. M3 hex-head bolts for the chassis and axles - I know, it's an indulgence since most of these will be hidden under the bodywork once the vehicle is assembled of course! More soon - wish me luck, Dr Dremel is about to get serious! Jenny x
  24. cont. So before there would be no going back with the body, I wanted to check how the engine and gearbox might fit in relation to the interior/dashboard I plan to fit - especially as in this particular HiLux application, I want the chassis-mounted steering servo in front of the engine (in turn moving the whole motor and gearbox assembly back a bit), as the motor really needs to be central in the engine bay for what I've got planned - you've guessed it already I'm sure! It turns out the rear front-spring shackle mounts were the perfect location (and meant I could double up on the same mounting bolts of course - keeping that underside neat), all that needed doing was to lop-off part of the engine mount supports to clear the spring bolt directly underneath. photo. gearbox support bracket also narrowed to fit the slightly inboard location of the support brackets. photo. motor and gearbox in place, with enough room for the servo in front on the designated chassis mount: Right, time to get the styrene out! Jx
  25. cont. With the axles securely fixed, I then wanted to finalise the damper mounting locations: photo. Initially I'd mounted the front dampers using the towers that came with the chassis - mounted inboard of the chassis rails with a long spacer. photo. Subsequently I changed these towers to thin hoop style that mount on the outside of the chassis - giving me a wider engine compartment (which is going to be important this time around ;o) Fortunately the combination of the hoops and a short (1mm spacer) means the dampers still remain vertical above the bottom mount on the axle, and even at extreme articulation - not that there is all that much on this vehicle to be honest - they do not touch the chassis rails as the axle swings slightly from side to side. Result! At the rear, I was always intending to fit double dampers anyway, and the 1/14th Truck dampers (just over 50mm long eye to eye) fortunately come in sets of six - and fundamentally are short enough to fit between the lower damper mount on the axle, and stay below the bottom of the load-bed too - another result! It's worth noting that these Truck dampers don't have M3 ball ends, rather use step screws (approx 3.5mm diameter) to mount them in their original application. This meant I had to get creative, and ended up using a series of cone washers to centre the dampers on the M3 screws I used - plus in the rear dampers I put a small silicone bush (cut from a length of 4mm diameter tubing and squished in the lower damper mounts) to centre everything while still allowing the dampers to move on their mounts as the suspension compresses and extends. The mounting locations also dictated that the natural way to mount each damper was with the top and bottom mounts at 90° to each other - which in turn ought to help eliminate any binding as the axle moves slightly fore and aft as well as up and down - such is the nature of leaf springs of course. photo. back on it's wheels again - the finished rolling chassis. cont.