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GooneyBird

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About GooneyBird

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  • Birthday 08/27/1987

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  • Location
    The Netherlands
  • Interests
    Anything that goes vroom!

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  1. Alright, here's the weirdest set of pics of my Clod I've ever taken. From top to bottom: A Clod, a standard Tamiya screwdriver (L), the TT01DRE, and a 7.2 NiMH stick pack. I figured those are probably the easiest things to convey scale. As you can see, the ground clearance under the gearboxes is about 1/2 that of the overall height of the TT. The tires, meanwhile, are taller than a stickpack, but slightly shorter than the screwdriver. Banana for scale. xD (To be fair, the banana is on the large-ish side of things) Great, now I'm hungry for a banana. The overall width of the Clod is a little less than the length of the TT. The trackwidth is about the same as the wheelbase of a touring car. You can just about squeeze a stick pack between the tires. A banana, meanwhile, can rest comfortably on top. Anything else you'd like to see posed on / near the Clod? I can probably mock up something with A4-paper, if you're European. I have some 12" records laying around, don't know if you have one of those to compare...?
  2. Alright, here's the weirdest set of pics of my Clod I've ever taken. From top to bottom: A Clod, a standard Tamiya screwdriver (L), the TT01DRE, and a 7.2 NiMH stick pack. I figured those are probably the easiest things to convey scale. As you can see, the ground clearance under the gearboxes is about 1/2 that of the overall height of the TT. The tires, meanwhile, are taller than a stickpack, but slightly shorter than the screwdriver. <a href="https://ibb.co/XD0tBxf"><img src="https://i.ibb.co/qCqpGYL/IMG-5772.jpg" alt="IMG-5772" border="0" /></a> Banana for scale. xD (To be fair, the banana is on the large-ish side of things) Great, now I'm hungry for a banana. <a href="https://ibb.co/cbZKSbZ"><img src="https://i.ibb.co/z8BWT8B/IMG-5774.jpg" alt="IMG-5774" border="0" /></a> The overall width of the Clod is a little less than the length of the TT. The trackwidth is about the same as the wheelbase of a touring car. <a href="https://ibb.co/FgR1jnt"><img src="https://i.ibb.co/cD497xd/IMG-5776.jpg" alt="IMG-5776" border="0" /></a> You can just about squeeze a stick pack between the tires. A banana, meanwhile, can rest comfortably on top. Anything else you'd like to see posed on / near the Clod? I can probably mock up something with A4-paper, if you're European. I have some 12" records laying around, don't know if you have one of those to compare...?
  3. There are a lot of amazing scale builds here, and on the internet. In static photos, sometimes these cannot be distinguished from the real thing with their amazing realism and attention to detail. But as soon as they start moving the illusion is broken. They're clearly too light for what they are, bouncing up and down far too eagerly with every tiny bump. In slow-motion video (Heyoo Mateo!) this isn't too bad, but once you start seeing them in real-life, the lack of body movement compared to the suspension travel is jarring and pulls you out of the illusion of looking at a real car. Even scale semi-trucks, which are fairly heavy for their size, have the issue of suspension that's too hard, and a little underdampened. Enter technology! With an Arduino, micro-servos and a LOT of 3D-printing, you can have a car that moves like the real thing. Especially if the 1:1 car weighs something like 2500kg. Also, I spy TT01 steering knuckles and DT02/03 front wheels with custom hubcaps. Tamiya pride!
  4. It's big, but actually smaller that you'd think. I can put one next to a touring car tomorrow if that helps.
  5. My 2 cents (as owner of a BSR Racing M.rage) Custom lower and upper CF deck holding a shortie lipo on one side, and the electronics on the other side. Driveline out of a TRF420, but with a shorter belt (obviously) Custom arms, because normal M-arms will not work with the droop cutouts in the chassis TRF420 C-hubs and steering knuckles (because the TA07 C-hubs are fragile) M-chassis dual-jointed universals up front (so you can run a spool if needed) and steel ones in the back. The laydown motor mount precludes most brushed motors, but I'd run something like a 17.5 indoors, or maybe a 13.5 outdoor. You lose a bit of wheel speed due to the smaller tires, so you're gonna want to gear it heavy. (Optional): adapter plates so the car has regular M-chassis body mount locations. I mean, you'd have a pretty high-end car, and all Tamiya needs to produce are two different CF chassis plates, and 4 shorter arms. The upper arms are turnbuckles, so just use shorter ones. For different wheelbases you could even drill up 3 different sets of screw holes for the rear bulkheads, and sell 3 lengths of belt. And since you're using standard TRF arms, you could even go narrow front, wide rear (with normal TC arms) for body sets like the Renault 5 and the VW Golf Kamei.
  6. Funny, in my experience (Ex-Apple CRST, current ChromeOS sysadmin) it's usually the ones with the least cycles on them that go poof. The work horses with 1000+ cycles just sorta lose capacity and go out like a candle in the night, but the ones with maybe 12 cycles and a user that lugs around a charger everywhere (s)he goes are the ones that lose a battery first. It's almost as if.... batteries like to be used! *Gasp!* With that said, my battery as of right now: I still regularly get 5+ hours of usage from the battery in this 7 year old Macbook Pro. I'm happy.
  7. But still they did! So I charged up two packs for the Pajero today, thinking I'd go for a nice stroll in the woods nearby and put some miles on the little CC01. All went well, the charger went *beep* and both packs finished charging within a reasonable time. I tossed one in a cinch bag I have, and stuffed the other one in the car, ready to go. I walked upstairs to grab my phone, radio, wallet, and gave my wife a quick kiss goodbye (I need to build her a trailer too, but that's a different story. ) When I came downstairs again I smelt something horrid. I thought the neighborhood kids were blasting off the last of their fireworks, but then I saw smoke billowing out from under the Pajero's body. :O I pulled the body off, opened up the front door and chucked the whole thing outside in a sandy area of our front yard. It sat there for a good couple of minutes smoking and sputtering god-knows-what out the battery. That's why I left the pack in there. I unplugged it, took the battery retainer off, and felt the heat coming off the pack. As the CC01 has a bit of a fiddly battery removal procedure (the pack is a snug fit, and needs a bit of poking before it'll come out) I decided that I'd rather throw the whole thing outside. I'd rather lose the chassis than my hand! After about 15 minutes it had cooled down enough for me to be able to touch the thing again, and this is what I found: As you can see, the pack split open and a few cells exploded/went critical. The whole thing heated up to such an extend... ... that it actually melted through the chassis! Normally the battery pack fits the whole quite snuggly. Now though... You can see where it actually tried to melt through the chassis! The metal parts surrounding it seem fine, thankfully. This is the other side of the battery compartiment. You can see where the plastic buckled. Much to my surprise the wiring surrrounding the pack is fine. most of the heat seemed to have been absorbed by the plastic chassis. So my plan is to rebuild, obviously. The battery is completely fused with the chassis, and no amount of poking will make it budge. I've put the car back inside, the smell has disappeared mostly, and the whole thing has cooled down. Just to be safe I've connected an H7 bulb to the battery, and when no current came through that thing anymore I dead-shorted it. I'll take the whole car apart, and throw away the bathtub along with the battery. Hopefully everything else is undamaged. I haven't had a chance to test the electronics yet, but the ESC and receiver are far away that I don't think anything happened to them, the motor can take a bit of heat, but the servo is the questionable factor here.
  8. No clue. That should absolutely work. Even a 1A BEC is more than enough to power that servo.
  9. I'd like to get some track time, but for some reason I can't gel with the people at the local outdoor track (and I'm not sure outdoor driving is my 'thing'. I much prefer indoor). There's an amazing indoor track about two hours away, but they're closing in April due to losing their space, and I'm not sure if they're reopening in another location. So track time currently is a bit limited. Which sucks because all of my cars are 100% ready to go. Projects: - I'd like to upgrade the TRF419 to the TRF420 suspension setup. The stronger C-hubs ought to pay for themselves after a few sessions. But, it's my indoor car and there just isn't much indoor running anymore. - I'd like to finish the trailer for the Pajero. - Run the Clod on the beach. That thing is hilarious good fun on the sands. - Do another endurance race with the TT01. Last year's one was great fun! And then there's real life. My job is teetering on the edge of bankruptcy, more so than usual. This takes up a lot of energy and late nights just to keep the **** company going. Then there's the issue of me not being able to decide what kind of motorcycle I'd like to buy for myself. (I know, first world problems!). My wife bought a Honda CBF500 a few years ago, but doesn't like riding it all that much and bought a 250cc scooter, so the Honda ha sorta fallen into my lap. Except it's been lowered for her and so every time I ride it my boots wear down, which gets really old really fast. I'd like to get my own bike, but I just don't know what. I'm drawn to the allroad-look and seating position, but I love the raw utility of her 250cc scooter for doing shopping around town. And an allroad with a bunch of cases on it looks dorky. Also, I'm working on publishing a book, and that takes a surprisingly large amount of time and patience. (more so the latter). In 2020 I'd like to get my book out there and on book shelves, maybe make a bit of cash off of it.
  10. If the front gearbox casings and the shock towers are the same as a TT01, go for TT01E-parts. They're WAY stronger than TT01 parts.
  11. I run 2S and silver cans in my Clod, along with steel pinions (she's a heavy beasty!), ball bearings and metal anti-rotation brackets. I literally snapped one of the plastic ones within 10 minutes of running it. To be fair, my Clod is 20+ years old, and thus the plastic is a bit brittle. After that it's been an absolute tank. Treat it with a bit of respect and it'll last.
  12. Yup! I like it! I wouldn't trade my OG red Clod for it, but out of all the color editions this is one of the nicer ones. Also, spare red parts! This is good!
  13. TT03. I can just about taste it. xD In terms of re-re, I'd like to see some sort of riff on the OG red-and-white Clod. Perhaps a color-edition? The Wrangler on the CC02 would be amazing, and really scale-correct.
  14. For the tight track I'd go with the 58t spur. That'll give you the widest range of FDRs to play with. Find one that keeps the motor temps under control. Alternatively, gear it so that it reaches peak RPM just before you start braking on the long straight. Outdoor just go as big as you dare. I'm running a 25/55 outdoors.
  15. I'm currently running a 25/55 ratio. This works for most outdoor tracks with a 25t Carson Cup Machine. I can imagine with a 17t you'd want to gear it a little lighter. What size tracks are you guys running?
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