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Gazebo

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About Gazebo

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  1. Hi. I just would like to encourage you not to give up on Dremel just yet. I find it totally irreplaceable when it comes to finishing polycarbonite bodies. I start with scissors (both straigth and curved) but only cutting to the final line if its easy enough to cut very accurately. Otherwise I leave a few millimeter extra. The second step is drilling holes with specialized reamer like this https://www.tamiyausa.com/shop/tools/rc-car-body-reamer/ (there are more economic versions available). The reamer is also used when cutting end points for rounded rectangles. The third step is the Dremel work. I mostly use the sanding bands attached to the rubber drum. The larger band preferable but some smaller parts require the smaller drum. I use roughly half rotational speed and move the sanding band on body edge quite fast and as long way as possible each time. I keep the band in angle (just not 90 degrees) to the edge and keep switching from side to side to keep the annoying "melt" plastic flash in minimum. I have not had big issues with the protective film peeling off but anyhow in such cases masking tape fixes any problems easily. The top edge of the sanding band can be used to create neat 90 degree angles in locations where scissors are not an option. The abrasive cutting wheels can be used finishing the rounded rectangles. Just go very careful with the wheels and also keep eye on the Dremel's socket itself does not accidentally touch the body when working very close to the body. The fourth step is sanding all the edges to more smooth finish and removing the flash from Dremel work with 400 grit paper. You can go very easy with sanding, just 3-5 swipes should be enough for perfect edge. Please see the attached picture for something that's next to impossible achive without Dremel or similar power tool.
  2. Hi, mostly stator that defines the rotational speed. Many motors of variable turn values and KV ratings use the very same rotor part to prove the point.
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