Jump to content

SlideWRX

Members
  • Content Count

    619
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

856 Excellent

About SlideWRX

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 04/22/1974

Profile Information

  • Location
    SE Michigan

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I keep seeing "The 0.7mm thick polycarbonate body has the same classic body shape as previous versions" - What is the thickness of the current Hornet body? It sounds like this will be a more durable version... I love that this is coming out but I hate that we have to wait so long...
  2. One of my to-dos was to get a Rising Fighter or similar and modify it the way I wanted to- "If I remade the Hornet, this is what I would do..." I feel like a lot of people did this, especially because of the poor handling. There is some charm to the original, but the original is still there - how many million have been produced? It won't disappear. The appeal for an EVO would be to fundamentally update/improve performance. I love that they used a DT-02/03 gearbox, although I wish that gear box would get updated with more pinion options - other gearboxes have 5 or 6 sets of holes for a larger range of pinion adjustment. Re-using the tub, re-using the body is great stuff, although the bump for the speed control servo doesn't need to be there. The Gearbox is already designed/tooled, the body/tub is carry-over, The body, the wheels too, so this is likely only one sprue that they had to design to do the new suspension arms and the adapter for the gearbox. Just thinking about this, I have a set of Hornet stickers because one of the first things I wanted to do when I got back into the hobby four years ago was to put a Hornet body on my DT-03...
  3. It's a bit long to fit on a wing. Maybe along the side?
  4. Yeah I assumed their shipping was the profit center - always 2-3 times as much as it should have been, especially for small prints. Thanks! just used craftcloud to find a printer.
  5. I was getting an error trying to get my design printed, turns out they just filed for bankruptcy this week. What replacement options are there for those of us without 3d printers? https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/shapeways-bankrupt-5m-rescue-bid-rejected-231387/ Maybe this is the impetus to purchase one, although the potential smell of them may force it to live out in the shed via extension cord. I wouldn't mind much with proper ventilation, but my wife notices if I come inside too quickly after spray painting lexan... Just the bit of smell of paint wafting around and being pulled inside bothers her.
  6. I love how they got a bit of body trim over the front diff - so many ignore that. I'm not a fan of the wheels being on this chassis. They feel like classic steel wheels that would look good on an old style pickup truck or 60's hotrod though.
  7. At a competitive level a motor can be a consumable, like tires. It puts strain on the motor, but only for 5 minutes. The goal is to run it at the highest possible gearing & timing advance without burning out during the race/race weekend/race season, depending on budget.
  8. There have been some bumps in the road to EV adoption lately, but it is likely to be only a year or two. Most manufacturers cut out their 'cheap' models during Covid due to electronic chip supply issues, and no-one wants to go back to the poor margins on cheaper vehicles. China is fine with it though, and will bring in the cheap stuff, so everyone is scrambling to keep market share while badmouthing China to delay their entry/raise tariffs. A lot of political double talk is going to to make things seem worse/better than they are. For the US at least, Electric is still low volume, around 10%. Until more cheaper options come on the market it will stay low. Projections seem to vary wildly, but there will likely be a worldwide 50%gas/50%electric crossover around ~2035, and the US much later. That means in 10 years a LOT of gas vehicles will still be produced, and on average they are lasting 12+ years. That means there will still be a large gas delivery economy and gas cars will still be very commonplace in 2040. In terms of batteries, there seem to be a lot of solid state replacements in the works that double range for the given weight/space, and reduce cost. They actually seem to be scaling up real batteries, so not just a pipe dream but actual products. They also have longer lifetimes and degrade less between charges, so used cars will be more desirable. Some/most still use a significant amount of Lithium. At least for the non-mobile space there are a lot of much cheaper (but heavier/bigger) options for the grid under development, so lithium will only be part of the worldwide solution. Hydrogen still has a storage problem - how much one can store in a vehicle. Hydrogen tanks are very high pressure and don't store enough to be competitive right now - they need some major advancement on that. They could be a wild card though. Some other things that could affect this are populations - Japan and China are both officially shrinking. The US would be shrinking except for immigration! Solar production - it could be used to create hydrogen, or even gasoline equivalents! At some point (practically beyond 2050 I think) gasoline manufacturing(NOT refining from oil) may become carbon neutral... Solar production is scaling up MASSIVELY. Solid state battery development - they are starting to ramp up production of these, and a breakthrough could mean every car could have 500 mile (800km) range and 5 minute charging, which does make gas powered cars redundant, even for road trips. Plug In Hybrids (PHEV) & Range Extended Electric Vehicles(REEV) will take a while to replace 'plain' gas engines. In regards to getting a single car now for the next 20 years, go for it. If you are worried about the carbon footprint, find a reputable carbon offset and put money into that. Gas powered cars will be around for a long time.
  9. I think the police was there because they were dealing with "hazardous materials". Someone with training probably had to be there for the insurance. You know, toss the cat litter on the spill...
  10. I think the biggest difference is C comes with an internal battery pack and regulates voltage better - people with the B says it eats batteries. I have a C and have no complaints.
  11. It takes a while to remove the bias from Phillips screwdrivers on phillips screws. JIS screws and an appropriate driver are noticeably different, but that lifetime of phillips, and to be honest, cheap screws that strip easily really mess things up. I definitely like hex hardware, but the last couple projects for me have been on used platforms with JIS screws and since I have good drivers now I have not had any issues with the screws, taking out or going back in. I have accepted that not all projects need hex hardware. I have a TD2, and the oddities of the chassis it shares with the TD4 come off as 'Why?' more often than not.
  12. I use Arrowmax titanium turnbuckles: https://www.asiatees.com/display?id=149885 Kyosho also offers some turnbuckles, starting with 92411 part number for their smallest and going up, but no too many sizes offered: https://www.plazajapan.com/4955439679852/
  13. I like that you keep adding random little bits to the shop. Power tools & boxes, pictures/photos, WD-40. It's getting messy!
  14. Congrats on managing to re-invent your income - that is pretty tough. I haven't yet hit an honest dark time - I did this as a kid and only came back about three years ago. I am looking for a new job because I don't see my group at work surviving another couple years - Engineering is getting farmed out to other countries. For every 1 they fire here they hire 2 or 3 in other countries. They figured out that if 10 people could do 90% of their job at home, take the 10% percent in-office and pile it on one local person and farm out the remote part to the cheapest location possible. For half the price they get twice the people. Eventually the local work will be taken over by suppliers, or they will re-create the test/build facilities in other countries. I'm not too surprised - it has happened to plenty of technical jobs, and 'they' have been trying to outsource engineering to other countries for 20+ years, but it finally kicked into high gear with functional remote work.
×
×
  • Create New...