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Found 195 results

  1. Hi everyone! I've seen that some people were struggling with mixing body color paint for Tamiya's Hyundai i20 bodyshell. I've just ordered one from Gmarket and while waiting for it to arrive I am considering some painting options. I'd like to stick with Hyundai's livery. I've been searching for appropriate body color because I don't have any option to mix colors as Tamiya recommending in body's manual. I stumbled upon a Tamiya PS-32 (corsa grey) and I'm curious about how does it look like in real life. I found some photos on the Internet but every one is different. Sometimes this corsa grey color is kinda blueish, sometimes it's greenish. Does anyone used PS-32 before and could help me to decide? This is the easiest option (for now) to paint body color but I'd like to hear some input from more experienced Tamiya PS paints users Thank you!
  2. I am not sure how much excitement there may be for this new car, but I see a whole lot of possibilities for the shell: Any takers for this one? The 1:1 Citroen 2CV was the basis for a lot of, uh, inspired works: While the Tamiya release is quite likely to be a polycarbonate-bodied version, I am wondering if anybody else might be inspired by its appearance in the new releases list. Edit: Now paging @JennyMo and @IBIFTKH:
  3. Evening Some of you may remember my FF01 speed run car I've been slowly building. It's not quite finished although the finish line is certainly in sight now, so I thought it was about time I started my next project which I've had in mind for a while. For the last couple of years I've had an old TA01 Chassis kicking around. I've never used it but it's always sat on my desk in the hope I might build it into something one day. Well, that Chassis still isn't being used but it provided the inspiration for this build. It all started off with me spotting a brand new TA01/02 FRP Chassis kit on eBay a few weeks ago. I stuck it in my watch list expecting it to get snapped up before I had the money to buy it myself. Surprisingly as pay day came around three weeks later it was still sitting there. So I bought it, and plenty of other bits to go with it. Anyway, today those bits arrived Not one to stand on ceremony I got straight on with building the chassis. Now I've dismantled plenty of TA01 and TA02 chassis' to be able to do it with my eyes shut, however despite my FF01 being FRP the chassis came pre-assembled so I've never actually built one. After staring at the parts tree and pile of screws for a while I decided to get the FF01 down to use as a reference for where it all went. That worked and before I knew it I was underway You'll notice the FF01 doing a bit of life modelling in the background. A very useful reference. I figured as I'd got this far (reasonably quickly) I might as well attach the gearbox casings as well. Im still waiting for a rear diff to arrive so I could only attach the main rear housing, however because I'm running this as RWD I carried out getting the empty front casing screwed together and onto the chassis along with the FRP top deck I then had to figure out how the carbon front body mount bracket went together and onto the chassis. It took a bit of googling to find a decent picture but I think I got it right haha! I'm still waiting for plenty of other bits to arrive but I'm happy with the start I made this evening For the body I decided on the Mercedes 190E from the TT01E kit. After lots of searching I managed to find someone selling the body, sticker set and wheels but after adding it all up with shipping it was coming to nearly £70!! I did a bit of googling and found Tower Hobbies were selling the whole kit for £93 delivered! So I bought the whole kit! Ive taken out the body, stickers, wheels and tyre's and I'll advertise the chassis kit on eBay as I've got no interest in the TT01. Thats about it so far. Not bad for the first night
  4. Recently, a TamiyaClub member had an idea for a project which interested me: I offered to write some fiction for it, using ideas from that thread, the sources that inspired it, and influences from my own work. Reading the initial post there will give the required context for this thread. The result is a story that chronicles a potential development route for the famous Avante. The actual Avante's history is documented, so this is purely fiction. It uses details from the RC car's development, but otherwise attempts to treat it as a real racing car - and the driver figures as people. Certain elements of the story may not be entirely accurate - I never owned a Vanquish, Egress, or Avante 2001, after all - but are adequate for the narrative. My knowledge of Tamiya's actual racing programs is likely not entirely accurate, either, including the bits about the TRF 211X and 411X. Again, fiction. I am putting the story here in case it is not accepted as the vision of the project's creator, in which case it is my stand-alone writing. Personally, I find it interesting to think about an RC project including elements that go beyond just the car and its parts. The writing is amateur at best, but so are my other hobbies! This first part in particular is heavy on exposition, but will set up a story later. And now, presenting: Tamiya Azente: TXR, the Avante, and the Driver who Never Raced "First, be aware that I was the one chosen for this project among almost one hundred drivers. Among them, the promising Albert Attaboy who remained stuck in Baja Buggy races, Evert Edwards who had relatives working at Tamiya and who couldn't get more than the Vanquish. Even Greg Martin, who was popular thanks to the Hornet, was in the list. The most pathetic of all was undoubtedly Ricky Roop." These were the words attributed to Marcus "Paranoid" Perry, the lead driver for the Tamiya Racing Factory (TRF), and the one entrusted with the famous Avante. Chapter 1: The Avante Today, the Tamiya Racing Factory is a formidable force on the racing scene, fielding competitive racers across all categories and winning prestigious events around the world. Privateers using the team’s equipment have managed to score many successes at the club and national levels. The genesis was the Tamiya Avante program. *** Tamiya was responsible for the democratization of off-road racing; their Rough Rider and Sand Scorcher kits allowed even the casual enthusiast to take part in competitions. Both were setups high on value, with rugged components that could withstand the abuse of hard driving under harder conditions. The pair had a certain aesthetic flair, as well: purposeful lines that emulated the Volkswagens upon which they were based went well with the simple appeal that their oversized tires and sturdy mechanicals had. The ones with the most time and money of these amateurs became the professionals that established dominance over drivers with lesser vehicles. It took some time before the Rough Rider and Sand Scorcher could be challenged, but once rivals began improving on the basic layout, the racing scene began transforming rapidly. Lighter, faster racers emerged from other shops, and yesterday’s heroes became today’s second-class citizens. Tamiya sought to retain its stature within the racing community, and achieved it with the Frog. This lightweight rear-wheel-drive buggy was built on the principles that made the pioneering Rough Rider and Sand Scorcher so successful: durability, value, and aesthetic appeal. The emergence of composite engineering allowed Tamiya to drastically reduce the Frog’s weight compared to their earlier models, blessing the new one with the sprightly acceleration of its animal namesake. Thus, a cycle ensued between Tamiya and the other racing companies that were beginning to establish themselves to challenge the incumbent. As these rivals advanced, so did their designs, producing a gap that Tamiya would close with a new design of its own. It was an arms race that saw Tamiya launch weapons like the Hotshot, waging its wars on the track, fighting ferocious battles in every heat. As time passed, the cycle intensified… At last, Tamiya did not have an answer. The company had cars winning at club and national races, but was dangerously far behind its rivals on the international scene. The Hotshot, once the car to beat, had spent precious little time atop the time sheets, and new developments on this design proved ineffective in bringing the fight to the rivals once outpaced by the racers bearing the twin stars. It was in this tumultuous time that a new racer – something completely different – was unleashed. *** The new car was Tamiya’s superweapon. It was supposed to change the balance of power in the off-road racing scene, and restore Tamiya’s name as not the producer of cutting-edge racers, but of winners. Yet the design of the Avante would have guaranteed both. It would win Tamiya the war. Extensive research and testing programs resulted in a highly-sophisticated chassis in an innovative configuration. Four-wheel-drive was not new at this level, not even shaft-driven four-wheel-drive – indeed, Tamiya introduced it with their Hotshot – but a longitudinally mid-mounted motor certainly was. A double-deck composite chassis was specified in place of the then-standard ‘bathtub’ type, and metal was used extensively in the suspension links, in place of plastics, for more precision and adjustability. Metal was also used for the coil-spring damper bodies, and the dampers themselves were of much-higher specifications than those found on other Tamiyas. Special attention was paid to aerodynamics; while this aspect of design is a vital component in on-road competition, the incoming design placed new importance on it in the off-road category. The swoopy Thundershot predated the new car; however, the former did not go to the lengths of the latter, which even had a special undercowl to streamline the bottom surface. A large rear wing generated downforce, which at its most aggressive settings brought its aerodynamic performance closer to its contemporaries, but with much more useful grip. Set low, the car cut the air quite well. Even the wheels featured aerodynamic hub caps, with cam-lock mechanisms that allowed for tool-free wheel changes. This new racer was designed exclusively for electronic components. Eliminating the bulky mechanical speed control setup found in contemporary cars allowed the designers to wrap the body shell tighter around the chassis, reducing frontal area and chassis size. The cockpit featured fully-electronic controls and displays, and the steering wheel was shaped accordingly, to accommodate the requisite buttons and switches. It would only look slightly dated in a current Formula One racer. The result was a racing package that was (in principle) fully optimized for its intended use. Many bold decisions went into its configuration, creating a car unlike anything ever seen before in the racing world. Could a design rife with such fresh thinking really be as fast as it was believed to be? *** The Tamiya Experimental Racing (TXR) team was formed as a testing group for this groundbreaking car. The lead driver was Hinomoto Rikimaru, who was selected for his ability to adapt to ‘progressive’ designs, like the unusual Saint Dragon that he campaigned with the Coro Coro Racing Team. The finished prototype would be christened “Azente.” Some sources claim that it translates into “gift from God,” which is certainly how highly Tamiya regarded it, while others suggest it was the name of a powerful deity. Whatever the case, the Azente would be tested thoroughly by Rikimaru, and it was in this car that he was rumoured to have set unofficial course records faster than the leading racers of the day. Stifling secrecy characterized the Azente testing program. At the time, TXR was not even officially acknowledged by Tamiya itself! A special design with such prodigious potential could never risk being spotted by anybody, let alone a rival. Reportedly, the Azente was troubled by poor handling during early test sessions, but swiftly developed into a devastatingly-quick machine. Rikimaru spoke quite fondly of the car, and his lap times – some on the same circuits that appeared in the international racing scene – seemed to vindicate Tamiya for going ahead with such a bold design. Much of the prototype testing was done in America; hence, TXR would be based there. The location did allow for relative seclusion from Tamiya’s primary home in Japan. As the Azente progressed, the prototype gained new decals as different liveries were subject to tests, too! Tremendous excitement was building within Tamiya around the program. The astounding success of the race test sessions prompted Tamiya to push for an early start to the racer’s campaign. This decision was assisted by the acceleration of the program, owing to test driver Rikimaru’s devotion to the project and his long hours spent honing the car. *** The Azente was now deemed ready for competition. Somewhere before its first public unveiling, the name was changed to Avante. Refinements that went into the Azente was now changing the car’s design to the point that a new name was merited. Tamiya believed that “Avante” was more dynamic and indicative of the forward thinking that went into the new car’s design. The flamboyant lettering and colourful stars and stripes were replaced by a brilliant dark-blue finish, with sponsor texts in bright yellow. The intent was to give the car a more “professional [and] purposeful” appearance, befitting the high hopes that Tamiya placed on their latest weapon. Similarly, the TXR officially evolved into the Tamiya Racing Factory, to be the first team to race the Avante. The laid-back atmosphere that followed the crack squad of engineers working on a secret project was made more formal, in time with the group’s new role in the public eye. Suspension geometries and minor finishing details were revised for the Avante’s launch. A new testing program was launched, a quick one to further optimize the design for racing. Since it was felt that an engineer/driver was better at developing the Avante at this stage, Marcus “Paranoid” Perry, an emerging engineering and driving talent with the program, replaced Hinomoto Rikimaru. While Rikimaru did the driving for the Azente, Perry did the work refining the overall design package that resulted in the Avante. He would continue this role for the duration of the Avante’s career. Complementing the electronics package was an additional computer system that would allow the team to record and access live telemetry from the car. Data gathered here would be used by TRF and Tamiya for the further development of the chassis, as well as succeeding models. The Avante was unlike anything seen before in the off-road racing world at any level, and the engineers believed that its unique combination of adjustability, precision, and creativity could be leveraged into spectacular success on the international circuit, the kind that had been eluding Tamiya for so long. It had been designed from the outset with the qualities that made a championship racer. Tamiya felt that the car simply had to win. Nothing had been left to chance… *** What happened next is well-documented. The Avante, Tamiya’s great hope, and the flagship of its off-road racing efforts, failed conspicuously. The operation went into disarray as the new model showed poor handling tendencies and even worse reliability. The precision metal ball-end joints that were selected for their tight tolerances developed alarming slop after a few races, while other metal parts were either too fragile or too heavy. Drivers complained of vague-feeling steering that could suddenly snap into a spin, owing to its wide front tires and short wheelbase. The innovative wheels were also to blame, being much heavier than standard types, and less reliable. Cooling problems were evident in some events due to the compact packaging of electronic elements within the chassis; the motor was placed largely out of the slipstream, which made for better aerodynamics but poor heat exchange. The varied use of metal, composites, and plastic did not allow for a particularly-cohesive design, and so the overall quality of the product suffered. The Tamiya Racing Factory and its lead driver, “Paranoid” Perry, could only therefore collect limited in-race data from the Avante, and spent frustrating amounts of time replacing broken parts and tuning the chassis during the only season it was raced with factory support. At the end of its only factory racing season – a national one, no less – it could only finish seventh overall. *** The Avante was too expensive to write off as a total failure, and so different solutions using the existing chassis as a base were tried. Much of it was based off the data collected by TRF and “Paranoid” Perry: The Vanquish attempted to simplify things to the point of creating a new, less-expensive (and thus more marketable) model. This was an Avante with a longer wheelbase, bathtub chassis, cheaper components, and a new body. It featured more plastic than the racer upon which it was based, which increased slop but reduced the complexity of maintenance. The subsequent reduction in weight benefitted its handling. Unlike the Avante, the Vanquish could be equipped with a mechanical speed control, which increased its appeal with privateers. However, it remained out of the price range for many others, and so it did not recoup as much of the losses that Tamiya had hoped it would. Of note was the lightweight wheels: initially an upgrade for the Avante developed during its short front-line career, it would be specified as mandatory equipment for the Vanquish, along with aggressive pin-spike tires, to help address the vague steering and heavy rotational mass that plagued the Avante. The Egress, on the other hand, sought to upgrade the Avante to its maximum potential. In the process, it lost the metal ball-ends, but gained new chassis plates that extended its wheelbase to that of the Vanquish. Many of the plastic parts that were introduced on the Vanquish were used on the Egress, this time in the interest of lower weight. Switching to plastic ball-ends for suspension links further reduced weight and complexity. The Egress also featured Tamiya’s finest dampers, nicknamed “Hi-Caps.” The result was an improved car, but despite an elusive international victory, it was not a dominant racer. Incidentally, that winning car was heavily-modified from the factory Egress… Lastly, the Avante 2001 was a refreshed, simplified Avante. Unlike the Vanquish and Egress, this model would retain the Avante name and an appearance much closer to that of the original model, but using many of the chassis components that made their debut on the former two. This meant more plastic, including in the damper bodies. The Avante 2001 also returned to the same wheel design that appeared on the Avante, in a different colour. This model therefore retained much of the aesthetic character of the Avante, but would be easier to service and race. Despite these intentions, not many of them were produced or campaigned before Tamiya finally left the platform – and competitive four-wheel-drive off-road racing – behind. *** With the demise of the Avante, and the lingering spectre of its dubious competition legacy, Tamiya sought to quit four-wheel-drive off-road racing, and instead focused on rear-wheel-drive platforms. Much like its four-wheel-drive campaign, the two-wheel-drive effort saw few returns for the effort (including the notoriously-complex Astute). It was the end of an era. Yet TRF persisted, and once again Tamiya developed competitive two-wheel-drive and four-wheel-drive racers for off-road competition. These models, dubbed the 211X and 411X, were tested extensively, under a much more thorough program that was influenced by the lessons learned from the Avante. The 211X went on to become the moderately-successful and well-received Dyna Storm, but the 411X was not developed further and was ultimately never released. Many years later, when TRF returned to off-road racing, they did so with a two-wheel-drive car: the TRF201. It was only after cautious research and development that a four-wheel-drive chassis was announced. To this day, the Avante remains a cautionary tale too close to Tamiya. In a twist of events, though, the Avante now enjoys premium collector-car status with off-road racing enthusiasts. Even in the face of poor results, time has allowed for the appreciation of the Avante as a seminal design that perhaps was just the victim of poor execution. Several features it introduced, such as the longitudinal mid-mounted motor, became standard on the next generation of top-line racers, and it has since been lauded for its forward-thinking packaging, use of high-quality materials, and pure aesthetic appeal. The vintage racing scene gives the Avante a new competitive setting, and with new modifications available, it has become an easier racer to live with. What it may still lack in speed, it makes up for in glamour, and it is partly due to its lack of success that the design has become quite unique among off-road buggies. There may well never be another quite like it. *** Stranger than the Avante’s elevation from factory flop to blue-chip collectible is another theory for the Avante’s ultimate failure: the appointment of Marcus Perry as Tamiya Racing Factory’s lead driver for the Avante’s campaign. It is unthinkable now, with “Paranoid” Perry being the most famous name linked to the model, and yet it has been suggested that the release of the very driver who paced the prototype Azente through its entire program – Hinomoto Rikimaru – was the primary factor for the poor competitive career of the Avante. Rikimaru certainly showed a pace in the car that Perry struggled to find; had the man most familiar with such a unique car been permitted to race it in anger, Tamiya could have found itself with the international trophies it so longed for. Counter to this theory is the notion that Rikimaru worked to the Avante’s detriment. A driver with more experience in conventional machinery could have developed the Avante to the style of a conventional driver, making it easier to access the design’s inherent speed. This theory posits that by entrusting Rikimaru with almost all the driving development, he built the car too much in his own image, and so the performances of other drivers in a car inherently set up for him would consequently suffer. Rikimaru was noted as having little experience in four-wheel-drive racers, which could have made a driver expecting the car to behave more like one drive it poorly. The Avante, by accounts, required more attention than most other racers to point it in the intended direction of travel. Confusing this further are the reputations of each driver: Hinomoto Rikimaru is simultaneously recognized as having exceptional car control and poor driving instincts, while Marcus Perry is at once a gifted off-road racer and a hard-luck loser. Whether Rikimaru spoiled the car through his incessant development, or Perry was too impatient to find an ideal race-day setup, controversy surrounds these two men’s involvement in Tamiya’s grandest plan. Rikimaru, for the record, has been bitter over his release from TXR and its allegedly-preferential treatment of Perry, while Perry continues to speculate that Rikimaru somehow set him up for failure… … They don’t call him “Paranoid” Perry for nothing, after all It is here where the story of Hinomoto Rikimaru begins…
  5. Hi there, I decided to build a replica of my VW bus, a 1973 lifted type2 bay window (with a water cooled v6 engine ) into a RC model. I purchased a reedition 2010 Sand scorcher and started the build couple month ago, I thought it would be all about the details, trying to replicate all the work that went into my original bus into a 1/10 scale version, using a mix of old models parts, 3D printed parts and so on... This is where things started to be a little more tricky than I thought, the only body I could find online of a type 2 bus 1/10 (the one with the square front, not with the V front) is an ABS Body and a Lexan body found on eBay that are basically vacuum molded and lack a lot of details as a result . Second huge detail is the wheel spacing, the bus front to back wheel distance Of the bus body is a lot smaller than the sand scorcher wheel distance... this is when I decided to cut the bottom plate and reduce the overall size of my Sand scorcher body :/ In this thread i’ll Show you all the steps of my work in progress, this is far from being done but i’m Planning on posting regular updates of my built . Hopefully this will be a good one . Here are some pictures of my (real) Bus , you can find more here http://www.instagram.com/pacifist_northwest . Let’s see how close I can get wish me luck.
  6. ON HOLD PENDING FUNDS Hi guys, long time no post on TC. Time to offload some of the collection. Sales terms: Prices are net to me. Paypal as friend, or bank wire only. No checks. Available in the lemanic are, F2F always welcome, the beer is on me Shipping from switzerland extra, at cost. Always happy to provide more pics on request, but only if interested in purchasing, no tyre kickers please. Pease PM me if interested. Thank you! Paul Brand spanking NIB Tamiya Wrangler #84071. $300. Discountinued and hard-to-find.As new as it gets, box has been opened to check contents but that's as far as it went. Has the LED Module.
  7. Hi guys, long time no post on TC. Time to offload some of the collection. Sales terms: Prices are net to me. Paypal as friend, or bank wire only. No checks. Available in the lemanic are, F2F always welcome, the beer is on me Shipping from switzerland extra, at cost. Always happy to provide more pics on request, but only if interested in purchasing, no tyre kickers please. Pease PM me if interested. Thank you! Paul Brand Spanking New In Box F201 kit #58094 - USD349 The original quirky design from Shizuoka. As unopened as you will ever find (if you ever find one). Actually Theborder has one for EUR499 here: https://www.the-border.com/Tamiya-4WD-F1-Chassis-w-Orig-Body-F201-58294.html Mine is a lot less
  8. Hi! looking to sell my TA05IFS as I cant justifiy to my wife more then 1 touring car. So looking to trade it for a DN01 offroad buggy to keep the balance between my onroad-offroad vehicles. the TA05 IFS comes with box, boxart Advan Vemac 408R body and a LRP Mercedes C class DTM body. 1xset of tamiya slick, 1xset of LRP VTEC slicks TA05IFS RTR with silver can, TEU101 esc, and tamiya 27mhz radio gear. Servo also included. a few aluminum upgrades like steering, carbon center plate, carbon rear shock tower, all 4 shocks adjustubale, and a few more upgrades... also as for spare parts the new owner will get new belts, new diff spurs and pinions... stabilisers fron and rear, CVA touring car shocks and more.... my asking price is 199€ including shipping. Can be bought with batteries. a LRP 5000mAh Ni-Mh for Tamiyaclub members free! it is also listed on ebay.
  9. I am putting my old and RARE Carson CH-04 2speed belt driven nitro car for sale here first. It is missing motor (long shaft), dampers, bodymounts and electrics. This has a product code of 59169, this car was made while Carson was a DICKIE-TAMIYA member (dont know if still are) this model is much superior as the CR04 that can be still bought from Carson, this model is discountinued somewhere around 2006 and NIB price was around 200DEM It was powerd with a 2,5ccm nitro motor from 'Force', I believe same as Tamiya nitro models. It is in full working condition, all belts are provided and some spare. Also optional damper stays in matching blue aluminium, optinioal pinions... Since the Spur's are immpossible to find, I did pay to fabricate alumium Spur's they work perfect and are the same as the original plastic ones, new alumium spurs can be made at cost, not so cheap but possible. Price Edit: it is listed on ebay auction for 70€ + posting here on the forum I will put this to 60€ + shipping! What you see is what you get. ,
  10. Hi, looking for a Bruiser / Mountain Rider rolling chassis (with wheels/tires). No electronics/motor needed! It can be used condition, but must be complete and in working order. Must be located somewhere in EUR (I'm in Germany) due to shipping costs. thanks
  11. 1/10th scale Tamiya R/C AMG Mercedes-Benz C-Class DTM model for my personal Collection, Tamiya Kit No. 58139 TA-03 Chassis 540-Motor included, produced in 1994 and no longer available. This particular R/C model was professionally built and never used, only as a display piece and includes Airtronics Rival Sport, transmitter, receiver, steering servo and speed control plus extra 7.2V battery pack (both hold charge), sorry, no original package, in new condition. Either to play or display, $325, buyer pays USPS Mail and Ppal fee, see pictures below and car-in-action demo video available on request, please PM if any questions, thanks
  12. 'Basher' is a relatively new word in my vocabulary, one which I learned here at tamiyaclub.com, and now I need one. So I've 'won' an original Subaru Brat rolling chassis on ebay, shipped for a total of $60. I thought it was a fair price, although it showed up with a broken front body mount due to inadequate packaging. I believed an off-road RC car would make it through the US mail without getting broken, but wound up slightly disappointed. On the other hand it has bearings throughout which is a nice bonus. I was actually looking forward to the locked differential of the early Brat, but this one has a differential in it. Anyway the Brat was one of those cars I drooled over in the Tamiya catalog as a kid and I'm pretty excited to finally have my first ORV (man was I disappointed the fist time I saw a real Subaru Brat with it's tiny tires)! Not shown is a lexan Tamiya Brat body with decals, also from ebay.
  13. I am looking to build a midnight pumpkin but need some advice on which motor to use (preferably super stock), servos and esc. Also I will be looking to upgrade the stocks. Any other tips or suggested upgrades would be appreciated! Maximum spend (excluding the car itself) £200 Thanks, Ashicar
  14. Not sure this qualifies for Build or Design Thread. After watching The Grand Tour's VW Beach Buggies, i've decided to make a similar replica of Richard's modified Beach Buggy :-) Here's where I am starting with a Holiday Buggy on a DT-02, not going to make too scale. Just some modification that makes it looks a bit scale -ish.. list of things done so far... 1) full lights 2) Animated Driver, head and arms on steering wheel 3) roll-cage. similar ?
  15. Hi people! This is a new project. This is a long term project. I will need many time to complete it because it will have custom parts. I'm sure you will like it so follow this thread and stay tuned. Max
  16. Hi Guys, I have some steering parts that I want to use on my Blitzer Stadium but I don't have the aluminium mount (see pictures). If you know the number or code of this part (to fix the arms at the chassis) please comment. It will be really appreciated. Tks Glob356
  17. Hi I have an original stadium thunder and this came with a 13t pinion gear and a rs540 black sport tuned motor. I want to upgrade the motor however in the instructions do not give an option for any other size pinion to be used. Can I put in a 27t dirt tuned motor?. Also the standard rule I thought was to use a pinion gear two teeth below the motor so for 27th this would be paired with a 25t gear. With this rule in mind why would tamiya use such a low gear for that motor?. Also if I put a brushless 15t motor in could it handle it and again what pinion would you use? Thanks
  18. Hello. Okay as many of you are aware or have seen, i had my new in box celica 58096 for sale. I had been offered a nice amount of money for it, from a local guy, but i decided that money will not do much difference, and that the time i will spend to build and run this car and the fun will worth more to me. So after 20+ years, sitting on shelves, i decided to keep it and build it myself. Next upgrades, will be the original tamiya ceramic bearings, the dynatech O2H motor and the rally cockpit for the interior. The car will stay original so i will only use tamiya and other parts and hop ups that were officially released for this car at the time. So..to be continued..
  19. Okay i am looking to purchase the rally cockpit for the celica 58096 (painted). I need the drivers to be with red uniforms, since this is for the celica repsol. I can buy used or new, or anyone that is willing to paint one for low cost, can pm me. Photos of what i am after :
  20. need advise on motor , esc combos and links if possible ebay / amazon / ect ... thanks
  21. Hello. Been years since i had a tamiya ta02 castrol celica, and today i started building my new in box tamiya ta01 celica 58096. I have a few questions. 1) is there a difference if you put the large plastic bearings 1150 in any of their sides? 2) plastic bearings 1150 that i installed in the uprights seem to fall easily, and not tight as in other cars like the hornet. Is that normal? 3) everything followed from the manual, when i turn the wheels by hand they stop when i let them go, they dont continue spinning like in my hornet. Is that the 4wd difference here? thats all. Thanks
  22. Thanks, all for inviting me into the Tamiya Club...... I have been in the process of moving the past few weeks and re-discovered my old Hornet packed away in a box of stuff. It originally had a yellow body (photo 1) and a stock 540. I eventually put all ball bearings in it and a "Black Magic" Associated (I think) motor. After cleaning it up and finding all the missing parts, unfortunately I discovered that the original Airtronics radio bit the dust. So I decided to restore it with a new twist...... I always liked the look of the Grasshopper 2 body-and so I stuck one on the old chassis (photo 2) -it fits perfectly after drilling 1 hole in front of the Grasshopper 2 front post hole. And it goes well with the Hornet nerf bars..... Now she has a Sport Tuned 540 ready to go with a new set of tires (photo 3). The Black Magic motor still runs-so it'll be a decent spare...... I'm just waiting for a new Tamiya ESC and some new rear shocks.......Thanks, everyone, for taking a look......
  23. As per the title, I am after a set of 4 Tamiya 26mm Slick Tires. New or used, as long as they are decent condition as it's for a display model. Thanks, James.
  24. I just finished restoring my 1984 Grasshopper, my first RC car, and while I was in the middle of it, I came across a Rough Rider on Ebay with the original box and Acoms radio. This was the first real RC car I saw as a kid, but I could only save enough to get the Grasshopper. Thirty plus years later, I could afford it so I paid more than anyone else in the world was willing to pay (that's how Ebay works, right?). When I received it I checked over the condition to see what needed to be done. Surprisingly, it's all there and original with the exception of what appears to be a homemade rear cage. Tires are not cracked or excessively worn, but the rears are flat-spotted. Body has cracks at rear corners and nose and the roof is shot. Radio box has a crack at the front bolt, but otherwise is good. The previous owner extended the wires of the battery and on/off switch to the rear of the buggy to allow charging and turning it on/off without taking off the body. I'll have to return that to normal. Overall, it appears to have little use and I'm happy with it for what I paid. Now, I'm thinking about what I want to do to it before starting the tear down. I already have a re-release rear cage and roof. I'm considering just replacing the roof and cage and cleaning everything else, leaving the body with the yellow paint. While it's got some cracks, it has character. My other choice is to strip the body, fix the cracks and do the blue box art scheme. I already have reproduction decals on the way. What do you think?
  25. Tamiya celica 58096 first ta01 chassis still new in box from the 90s. Box has wear but content untouched. Accepting paypal. SOLD FREE shipping if bought within two days from the date posted. Accepting paypal
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