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Found 195 results

  1. Well it has reached the point where I think I am going to be parting with most of my collection. I am based in the US and would prefer to ship to the lower 48 states but if there is something you are willing to pay to ship elsewhere maybe we can work things out. I just dont have the time and space to be hoarding all these cars anymore, and you guys get first pick I take paypal and please message me here on tamiya club feel free to ask for more pictures or info. All prices are with USPS flat rate shipping included. DF03MS, New built roller, never run. Includes a older servo. The stickers on the shell I did my best but they do not look perfect. $140 Kyosho Optima Mid parts, belt, shoulder screws driveshaft and a bag of random parts. free to a good home just pay ship JG MFG yokomo YZ-870 big front bumper, fits what the label says, Free to a good home just pay for shipping AE RC10 team car build. polished kick plate. 1990 roar nats stickers on car and the purple body. $200 Kyosho F1 onroad car parts: tires/foams in great shape, top plate and rear pod $20 DB01R RTR minus TX (Can remove spectrum RX if not needed). Needs a CVD joint rebuilt and spring cup. Update: found a spring cup to use but its not a original. Also included is full set of front arms front/back shock tower, reinforced belts, hard drive cups. Motor and speedo is a generic 380 rotor in 540 can but it runs really well. $180 AE SC10 4x4 RTR (minus TX and I can remove the spectrum reciever if not needed) Missing one of the barrels that fits inside the CVD joint. Body has wrap applied. Hitec 645MG servo, castle 4 pole sidewinder system. I will include a clear SC10 body as well. This car has only been raced a couple of times. $200 Traxxas Slash 4x4 roller. I will include the low COG chassis kit and a clear slash body. Has alu hub carriers and knuckles. Soft compound slash tires that have half the lugs cut for better traction. High COG chassis is dyed black. Blue/ white Baja 1000 style body with lights molded in. $100 AE SC18 cars, very little run time on both of them, missing 3 spring retainers. both have silver can 380 and stock ESC and servo. $60 each or $100 for both HPI Nitro Rs4 MT, for parts, close to being a roller. I bought this for parts and it has a lot of purple hop ups. Team associated GT2 body. Parts for these are getting hard to find now that is the reason why i cant build the rest to completion $120 HPI Rs4 mt roller: Has a rear belt that is in poor shape. comes with two bug shells and one engine, no drivers cover or gear cover. Front MIP CVD's $120 Original Advante, period correct runner...novak ESC, Kyosho Lemans motor, super nice for being run. gearboxes and chassis are in great shape but someone before me put longer front shocks on and might have changed some other parts. Includes spare screws and suspension joints. Advante has Sold. AE RC10DS roller: Mustang body was trimmed poorly. The previous owner swapped out the hubs/knuckles over to traxxas ones so that standard touring car tires fit. I will include the original wheels and tires but they are rough and I dont think I have the correct hubs but will look into my parts and update if i do. Chassis is in great condition, missing battery cup. $120 HPI E10 Drift RTR w/ 2.4 TX, red AE86 body with some cracks but not bad. Novatech 380 rotor 540 can motor and speedo. Fun little drift car. needs ballraces for the hubs as the bushings are very worn. The diffs and rest of car have bearings. $140 Radioshack red arrow parts car free to a good home just pay the shipping. no remote or circuit board in the car
  2. An interesting chassis announced recently by Tamiya: the Lunch Box Mini on the SW-01 chassis. The link is Tamiyablog's; the chassis was also mentioned earlier on this site by TC's Mokei Kagaku, and on his Facebook page. From Tamiyablog: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Suggested retail price in Japan: approx. ¥ 10600 Expected release date in Japan: July 2019 ★ Condensed various mechanisms in a compact new design chassis that fits in both hands of adults ★ Uses an upper arm that works in conjunction with the steering wheel. Reduce the roll of the body at the time of cornering, reduce the fall. ★ The chassis is a gear drive 4WD that transmits the power of the motor located in the center to the front and rear wheels with a gear. ★ The body reproduces the popular Lunch Box in polycarbonate. Adoption of magnet type one-touch body mount makes it easy to attach and remove the body. ★ It can run with four AA batteries. ★ Upgrade to the 4WS (four-wheel steering) specification is possible simply by installing the “Upper Connect Bar (provisional name)” scheduled to be released as an optional part. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ As part of the "Star Unit" line, it is likely going to be quite a basic chassis, yet the technical details and the involvement of some sort of Lunch Box might make it intriguing...
  3. Help needed just got these any ideas what they are thanks for ure help
  4. Hello, i am new to more expensive rcs, and i made my first a flea market hotshot. Not sure if its a mk1 or mk2, but it came with pamphlets printed in 1985 for the nicad battery. I tried to fix the msc, but it still wont work, as soon as i plug in the battery, it just runs backwards even with the controller off. There is a considerable lip on one of the contact plates. Gear boxes and suspension seem good. I am looking to simply replace the old one with a modern esc. Also, i have a new motor that came with, is there any way to make sure that its a compatible power? I will post pictures this afternoon. Thank you all.
  5. Completion of this project has been almost a decade in the making... Commercial-level high-rez resin 3D printers had been sitting beyond $200,000 for all of the nineties and even when smaller desktop units dropped below $20k by 2011, their build envelope was only large enough to cram 5 or 6 custom ring designs into... IOW, not terribly applicable for 1:10th scale modeling. Jewelry casting resin was $175 a liter. Disruptors came on the scene with their $2500 resin printers. In 2012, this was a downright bargain compared to my first printer at $15k. Resin was "less" costly at $100/liter. Reasonable expense for paying clients, but remains extravagant for hobby tinkering -- and the build envelope stayed minuscule at 5.7 x 3.2 cm. The only way to fit a standard on-road 26mm wheel into this space is to orient it upright. I attempted this very exercise around 2014 but the end-result wasn't worth posting here. Problem? Vertical print position pooled and caused a resin imbalance. The build-envelope constraint permitted no other alternative attempts. The wildly off-balance wheel was only good for shelf display. 2019 is the next watershed year where resin 3D printers have started tickling the $200 milestone. How'd they achieve this? By utilizing super-inexpensive components from the cellphone industry -- deploying a relatively cheap 2k-resolution smartphone screen rather than building a 3D printer around a $1000 theatre projector makes all the difference in final cost. All the buzz became loud enough to take notice. At $200, there are indeed some cheap resin printers cost-wise but also cheap in quality; questionable design features abound. Experience proved invaluable in identifying features to avoid. The standout winner worthy of a spot in the stable is the Elegoo Mars at $250. Jaw-dropping price point no matter how you cut it. Tons to like: Stretched-film release design similar to my $15k printer suggesting low-maintenance workhorse reliability/repeatability. Superb Z-axis rigidity using a linear-rail like design. A wobbly Z-axis arm can cause disastrous banding in the print. User-replaceable critical components as demonstrated by their own instructional YouTube videos. Crack the masking screen? $40-ish replacement makes things right. Considerable leap in the build envelope. The Elegoo is able to print what fits within 11.9cm x 6.8cm (x 15.5cm height) and still maintains a 50-micron resolution. Color touch-screen control. Files read off a thumb drive. Prior resin printers mandated tethering to a dedicated computer to drive the projector. (itself limited to a bulb lifespan) After running a few calibration tests (largely unnecessary and for my own satisfaction), it was time to address my long awaited project. 26mm width BMW Style 35 wheel fitted to a Tamiya hex hub. Elegoo Mars 3D printer. Quickly Glowforged a pedestal storage box for it and made sure there was resin on-hand. One liter of their resin is just $45. Third-party resins can be used as long as they're formulated for these kinds of masked-SLA printers. Laser SLA like Formlabs and Moai require different resin formulations. Still, not many are gonna beat $45/liter! The free support & slicing ChiTuBox software has quite a bit of nice features coming from this veteran resin jockey. The ways to identify & edit supports for undercuts or floating islands is praiseworthy. One nit is that there's no apparent publicly centralized data pot for exposure times for Elegoo resins. Possibly walled off in their Facebook page. The product box only provides a range -- thus my initial tests. Small-object test prints suggested that my settings for Elegoo Black Resin be 60 seconds for the first 5-6 layers and all subsequent layers can be at 6-seconds exposure. As shown here, the represented build platform has plenty of space to accommodate an on-road wheel. For reasons outside the scope of this hobby forum, a flat lay-down positioning of the wheel isn't necessarily the most recommended, but I've printed using two alternate ways and got away with successful prints. ChiTuBox goes as far as asking how much I paid for this batch of resin and can calculate the projected volume of resin used and total cost of parts put on the build platform. Let me do the math for you.. a liter of resin ought to yield around 66 Tamiya wheels. Toss the sliced file onto a USB thumb drive and feed it to the printer. Here's the angled & supported version... What kind of detail does 50-micron yield? Hex heads on the lug bolts resolved with a faithfully reproduced dimple at the center of every one! Here 'tis mounted to the M-04L chassis... spins just as nicely as the Tamiya-made wheels. No off-balance issues. Giving the back part of the rim a squeeze shows that it takes nearly DOUBLE the effort over Tamiya's ABS plastic to start deforming. At roughly 1mm resin wall thickness, the toughness observed so far suggests it would fare no worse than manufactured wheels. Once I get my hands on more resin vats, I'll dedicate each one to their own resin making for super-quick printing material changes... black, grey, white, translucent, etc Now all the things that normally get scuffed up (side mirrors, body posts) can be easily and affordably re-grown on the high-res 3D printer. Onto the possibilities of fabricating all the details I only dreamt of decades ago... windshield wipers, light buckets, suspension arms, action cam mount...
  6. 1. I am based in Japan. 2. I ship with real tracking number. Delivery is quick, sometimes very fast, and shipping cost is quite low compared to most of countries. Shipping cost is not included in the price. 3. Please add 4,5% to the total to cover paypal fees. (you can send money as a gift if you trust me) 4. Since my prices are in ¥ you can check exchange rates here: xe.com 5. I can send by email, extra pics, or large size pics upon request. 6. I have good feedback on ebay, oople, rc10talk.. Ask if doubt. 7. My prices are 100% firm, I will not lower them. Dynarun SOLD, used but in very nice condition. Acto power, new, come with manual too. 14.000 yen Super stock type RR, lightly super, I doubt this has touched the floor. No scractches. SOLDyen Futaba MC510C New 3200 yen Sanwa Comras ESC+ servo new 3200 yen LRP IPC Digital New sealed To ebay HPI pro control unopened 11.000 yen sport tuned new 700 yen Novak mercury sealed To ebay FS sop new 8.000 yen LRP sx 12 masami edit. sealed To ebay Novak Tempest sealed To ebay
  7. Hi guys im struggling here! I’ve not built an RC for 25 years and now there are ESC’s instead of 2 servos. I have a Viper eco 27 which I’m running on a Tamiya DF-03 with a brushed motor and standard kit. i took it back to the shop that I bought all of he electronics as it would only go in reverse! (Steering is and always has been fine), the chap in the shop said it was a dud and swapped for a new Viper eco 27. so now I’m home. Everything works in reverse (if not a bit slow on the uptake) but when I go full throttle - NOTHING...... if I startin the middle and go slow to build up pace it works fine but I want to race! It seems if I go past 3/4 acceleration it cuts off. I’m stumped, annoyed and embarrassed as my 10 year old son thinks I’m thick 😂 any ideas or help please? CAEC61FA-AB56-4658-8E92-7C369BB17CC2.MOV
  8. Hi can anyone tell me what chassis this is please
  9. Can anyone tell me which chassis this is and would like to say thanks to any1 that has helped already brought a loft find and thanks to peep on here am finding out what I brought thank again
  10. Embarking on a 3 way with some falcons Falcon #3 - rolling chassis in need of a clean up Falcon #1 - filthy wrecked chassis in need of cleaning and repair Falcon #2 - brand new chassis, gearbox, wheels and loads of other bits (about 75% there) I’ll post some pics shortly JJ
  11. Looking for a used Super Sabre in decent shape. Thanks!
  12. Brand new in box with Tamiya ESC (company cancelled my order due to no stock then fulfilled it anyway - grrrr - so have 2 kits now) The DT-03 Racing Fighter special black Edition is as per a new Tamiya Racing Fighter with some extras and hop ups:- Hi-Torque Servo Saver (Black) (51000) - £10 DT-03 Lightweight Gear Shaft (5x45mm/2pcs.) (54560) - £2.50 DT-03 Full Turnbuckle Set (54572) - £15 4mm Flange Lock Nut (Black, 8pcs.) (54642) - £3 RS-540 Torque-Tuned Motor (54358) - £13 DT-03 CVA Damper Set (54567) - £20 Im in the U.K. Happy for local delivery or collection (free) or postage to EU (£12) £150 JJ
  13. SOLD tg10 mk1 tamiya nsx raybrig nitro. comes with box and radio controller. it ran twice, and you can see the condition under the chassis. i will ship worldwide at buyers expense. i could trade with a vintage tamiya hornet (58045) but NIB, and i will throw the extra cash if someone has one and is interested 155 euro excluding shipping (from Cyprus - Europe)
  14. Another day, another skillset to tackle... Where wheels and suspension arms and gears are best created with CAD software, the other end of the 3D spectrum is represented by digital sculpting programs for those who want to create organic, non-mechanical subjects using an artistic approach. The choice for those committed to sculpting is ZBrush. Are there ways of using scanning tech to acquire 3D data? Yes, but specifically for capturing living subjects, the choices become very narrow and harder to come by as explained here. Capturing/scanning 3D data without ANY sculpting knowledge means being locked into that one pose until more $$$$ gets ponied up for additional scans. Using some reference photos and coaching from "likeness sculpting" YouTube videos, a self-portrait sculpt gets finished in ZBrush... Sculpt is exported as an STL mesh and brought into the ChiTuBox slicing software (Free download & bundled with the $250 Elegoo Mars 3D printer). For this particular model, there weren't any egregious overhangs that warranted generating supports. YMMV. The model is double-checked to print at a target 1:10th scale. If it wasn't already done in ZBrush, ChiTuBox v1.5.0 offers another opportunity to hollow out the model by specifying the wall thickness. The CBDDLP file generated by ChiTuBox contains all the sliced image data along with resin exposure time info. All that's left is to feed this into the Elegoo Mars via USB thumb drive and tap the touchscreen Print button. This printer's touchscreen makes a Pause button available where it'll even raise the platform out of the resin to visually confirm and double-check the progress. Tap the screen and the printer continues back on the same spot it left off. Nice touch not found on my previous resin printers. All of 24 cents worth of resin used, the high resolution print finishes in three and a half hours. Remove it from the platform, quick rinse in an isopropyl tub, and it's off to the UV tanning bed for 10 minutes. As stated in another thread, I've devoted this resin vat to holding black resin. Once additional vats are available, I'll use those extras to hold Elegoo's grey, clear, and skin-colored formulations. For figurines, painting on black resin should make the colors pop more. The Elegoo Mars shares the exact same resin vat dimensions with the Anycubic Photon. This will allow users from both sides to jump brands or even find this market large enough where third-parties start offering replacements (eBay has vats listed for ~$35) Note how the eyeglasses printed perfectly. 'Nuff detail for ya? The main downside to a fresh black resin print is the difficulty in capturing the sculpted details despite using a macro lens and a light tent. Earlier red resin prints from years back posed in the driver's seat of the M-04L. Future iterations might involve tweaking the sculpt to evoke the sense of being reclined in a seat with arms reaching toward a steering wheel. This was not possible on the red resin printer as it was configured for a super-tight build envelope. On the Elegoo Mars? Plenty of build platform space to include the driver's seat headrest, steering wheel and even the instrument cluster - all in a single printed object. Still plenty more additional tasks to finish in this vein... sculpt a helmeted version for the F1 F201 chassis... review a bunch of YouTube videos on painting/airbrushing techniques with acrylic... Exercise that sculpting muscle and the world opens up to sooo many possibilities -- take your own creation and alter it at your whim... road-raging Xenomorph Wild-Willy substitute behind the wheel flipping the bird? Do it. Do it NOW!
  15. Vintage, near mint condition Tamiya QD cars; - Mitsubishi Lancer EVO VI WRC 46306 - Peugeot 206 WRC 46305 Was clearing out my attic and found these beauty's, originally bought them in 2000 on release for my then 2 year old son, opened once as i had to try these babys out and then put into storage, it is now 2019 as they were forgotten, life gets busy sometimes. £350 for both & offers
  16. Well after starting this build nearly 3 months ago Grasshopper #2 is finally finished. Waiting for parts to arrive is a killer! After perusing the interweb looking at other Hoppers I got a few ideas, along with seeing what not to do. My design brief to myself was to make it look different to anything else and try and make it look good while using the original stripes, oh and add a few hop-up parts in the process. I think I have almost nailed it, I'm pretty happy with the way it has turned out anyway. It now features a bunch of aftermarket parts (over night from Japan. Sheesh I wish!) which include coil over oil shocks all round, aluminium front suspension arms & bash plate, carbon reinforced uprights, full ball bearing set and aluminium wheel outers which look really nice. Also fitted are some very nice aluminium side nudge bars, gearbox oil filler cap & pinion cover/heatsink all from T4works. It still retains the little 380 motor so shes not fast but is totally controllable. Took it out for it's first run last night at the Manawatu Indoor RC Car Club meeting and she ran good. Had a couple of small teething issues to sort, the battery cover on the bottom fell off and dragged the battery on the floor and the front suspension had a couple of screws come loose. Not sure if that is because I failed to check them before assembly or if it means they are not up to the punishment, time will tell I guess. Picked up a few scuffs already but that's ok, just proof that it's been used and not a shelf queen. A nice addition to the collection which is growing.
  17. Hi all, New to builds, having had my Dad make me a Super Blackfoot as a kid. My cousin had a LB, and I always loved how mental it was to drive😂 My missus bought me one as a gift back in February and having put it all together, and immediately crashing it, I decided I wanted to look at making it fun but better to drive. To date I’ve installed a Tamiya Sports Tuned motor, metal bearings, and this evening I’ve installed oil filled shocks. Having just taken it out, it seems to sit better under load. I will say it pulls a touch to the left, and I’m almost certain that the wheels are spinning inside the tyres. So my questions are the following: How can I make the car better than stock beyond those adjustments? Should I have replaced the pinion with the motor upgrade? Foam in the tyres or not bother? What’s the best battery setup to choose? Where can I get a transmission strut brace in the UK, as I don’t want to do the 5th shock mod? Sanding down the damage on the body for re-spraying, what’s the best process? Sorry, lots of questions but I’m very new to this. Kind Regards, Carl
  18. As some of you know I am collection the 4WD buggies from my youth.From Boomerang to Terra Scorcher. Well at least I was till this popped up locally on GumTree for a good price. Told myself I was buying no more buggies till I had the ones I have finished. You know that lie we tell ourselves and the boss. It came with a box instructions and loads of bits and bobs, in full running order as it was raced. Ok so its not got the right wheels, or tires, the body is BRUSH painted inside and OUT!!!!!!! badly round the decals. BUT it was only £60 and came with Hi Caps and 2 Tamtec cars with it. The Tamtecs are already with a new owner, the wheels, original blue shocks and near bald tires and body are on their way and the money from the Tamtech's paid for for the car and the bits so its basically free.....This hobby pays for its self!!!!!! OH the lies we tell ourselves and our other half's. NO MORE until I have finished all the work on the ones I have. UNTIL that MUST have bargain comes up cause you secretly really fancy a (oh lets be honest anything Tamiya that looks good - **** thats just about most of the back catalogue!!!!!) It started with- I do LOVE the look of the MadCap and the Astute so if they ever came up at the right money.....And a Nissan King CAB, oh and a monster beetle, a lunch box (OK all the monster trucks really) maybe a FROG or a FOX as well BUT only at the right price.......honest!! **** who invented eBay you have a lot to answer for. SO what have you bought cause you found it at the right price rather than went looking specifically for it. Show us how you found it and how it finished up (basher or display)
  19. I have just picked up an old Fighter Buggy RX (Correct me if I am wrong!) from a boot sale. Not bad for £3 including an Ansmann quick charger and 2 batteries! I'm going to restore this one as a runner for my 8 year old - should be a good buggy to start with. It has electrics and it all appears to work ok. The main issues it has are a broken rear shock mount and the rear tyres are completely shot.
  20. Built entirely from Tamiya T3-01 Dancing Rider parts, my alternate build uses two sets. Even his head and eye pieces are directly out of the Tamiya T3 kit. Cog the Dog has 5 servos and a 6 channel receiver in his nose. An Adafruit micro gimbal moves the head, with left/right tied to the hip servo. 3 mixes coordinate arms and hip for four-wheeled leaning. A Traxxas 370, full bearings and an aluminum Hot Racing ball differential puts Cog at 25 mph. Please enjoy a little movie about Cog, an ongoing project that has taken many forms. The most successful one so far, unsurprisingly, is entirely Tamiya. https://drive.google.com/file/d/15Cv7sK0OL81QszjAD4fz_f8XaIIVgBop/view?usp=drivesdk
  21. So I have bought myself a well used (I admit this may be a bit of an understatement) Gravel Hound from everyone's favourite on-line bidding site. As is often the way I was looking for a new Tamiya project (snappily codenamed the Christmas/Birthday money project) and I happened to stumble upon this little fella. I wasn't looking for anything in particular just something new and as I haven't owned anything on the DF-02 chasis before I decided to take a punt as the price didn't seem to bad. To be fair to the seller he was upfront and honest with his photos and description - "very used RC car in semi working order with plenty of wear due to age and use" And it's hard to argue with that....................... Freshly out of the box and bubble-wrap.... It has certainly been enjoyed!
  22. Grastens Builds the Tamiya Bruiser (58519) The Kit Builder’s Build In the midst of the assembly of my Ferrari 312T3, the revival of my original Lancia Rally, and the planning and acquisition of another Tamiya-centric project, lumbered: It has been quite an outburst of RC-related activity lately, which is as sure a sign as any that I am dealing with some serious personal issues; burying myself in projects like this might be the least-destructive way to cope with them. I have never had the luxury of three new kit builds on the go, and the Bruiser will be by far the largest and most involved of them. Those concerns aside, I can point to the Tamiya Bruiser in my possession and say that this is a long-held dream of mine, finally realized! Finding a (Long-Winded) Dream My first Tamiya was a Toyota GT-One on the F103RS. It was a simple chassis that proved to be a good rookie car, if a bit difficult to find the ideal surface for it. I had always been interested in radio-controlled items and cars, so RC cars were a logical culmination. That car felt like a lifelong dream realized; playing video games was much more economically-feasible, and I had neither the money nor the support to treat radio-controlled cars as a real hobby. My childhood aspirations made do with the occasional cheap remote-controlled contraption, to be pitched when it broke after its inevitably-underwhelming performance. I could hardly complain, for I had the essentials covered in life, but I still fantasized about a true hobby-grade radio-controlled machine. Tamiya was even making the cars I saw in my video games – from Gran Turismo to 1:10 scale came the Castrol Celica ST205, the Calsonic Nissan Primera, the Castrol Mugen NSX – and the Toyota GT-One – all by the same company that produced the best static model I had built to that time (another story itself). My involvement in the hobby changed forever when I acquired a Buggy Champ as my second car; with it, I discovered the comparative freedom of off-road running, and nearly all of my acquisitions since have been all-terrain chassis. Along the way, I had been building my collection toward increasing mechanical complexity. I had always been interested in the mechanical aspect of machinery, and around the same time I purchased my Avante Black Special – then the most complicated build I would undertake – Tamiya re-released the Bruiser. It did not matter that I was not alive when the original Bruiser (or Avante, even) was available, for the concept of an all-metal, all-terrain truck with an actual shifting transmission was something that captured my imagination. At the time, I had saved up much of everything I had to acquire that Avante, but despite my good fortune that day, I still ended up wanting a Bruiser. If I were really increasing the mechanical complexity of my collection, the Bruiser seemed like a logical step, in the right direction, especially after the Avante. Instead, time and money (but mostly money) saw me take a different path with my cars, my desires for new challenges manifesting themselves in bodywork as opposed to chassis. I found out that the Avante was not what I envisioned; it had proven expensive to repair and limited in talent. Though Tamiya’s higher-end offerings certainly had my interest whenever they arrived, I probably never really wanted them as each new model slipped away without any further effort from me to acquire one. The Bruiser never totally left my consciousness, though. Eventually, I found that I was running out of spaces to run buggy-type off-road cars, and I was still intrigued by the sophistication of the 3-speed truck, especially as I learned more about automotive engineering. With classic models like the original 4 x 4 Hilux and Blazing Blazer reaching used-1:1-car prices, the Bruiser was the only affordable model until the Mountaineer re-emerged as the Mountain Rider. Even then, they were out of my grasp. It should be noted that the Tamiya Hilux High-Lift was also on the shelf that day at the hobby shop, yet neither that nor the Tundra nor the F-350 seemed to catch my imagination the way the Bruiser did. I passed it over completely. Fulfilling a (Long-Winded) Dream “I probably never really wanted them as each new model slipped away without any further effort from me to acquire one.” It was a trip to my local hobby shop for paints to complete my Ferrari 312T3 build when I finally decided I wanted a Bruiser, once and for all. It was likely triggered by the astonishing stock of Tamiya re-release models in the store: there – in the year 2019 – were new-in-box examples of the Novafox, Bigwig, Blackfoot, Egress(!), Monster Beetle, and a Frog, perched high on a shelf behind the sales counter. Clearly, the employees there had an appreciation for classic Tamiyas, which was encouraging. Pure curiosity prompted me to ask about their prices. I was astonished to realize that this particular shop had nearly closed the gap to online retailers, and every model there was competitively priced – I could have had an Egress for under $500 CAD after taxes! But then I asked the shop owner: “Do you still have the Bruiser in stock?” I saw one long ago, in another visit, and asked in the off-chance that maybe it was still kicking around. I never saw too many visitors in the shop, and the ones that were there either bought Redcats, Gundam models, or paints. “No,” he started, as my reasonable being sighed in relief, “but we can order one. You fill out a form, and we can have it in 48 hours.” My mind started racing, leaving my reasonable being in the dust. There’s no way I could… No way I should… If I have to ask… “How much would it be?” His reply shocked me. They had closed the gap – no, they had opened one up of their own! Even more shocking was learning that the upcoming re-re-release of the Mountaineer/Mountain Rider would be more expensive through the shop’s distributor, by $100 CAD, and not on pre-order. I had believed the Bruiser to be more complex somehow than its sibling, but this was completely secondary to the fact that a metal Tamiya 3-speed was now within reach! I would need to stretch, but within reach! “… I’ll think about it,” I said weakly, and continued searching for paints. I thought about it, all right, and a week or so was all I needed to clarify more than six years of dreaming and a lifetime passion for mechanical objects that begged me to make it happen. It felt like a lifetime had led me to that store the following week, where I sought out the shop owner, looked him in the eye, and said: “I want to order a Bruiser. Give me the form, please.” I was nervous. Last time I was there, I was talking myself out of it by telling the shop owner about my Ferrari 312T3, and laughing that I needed to finish that before thinking about any new projects. I knew I would need to work hard to get that money back, particularly as unlike the 312T3, the Bruiser had been unplanned just a month ago. Yet it felt like I had been preparing for it for much of my life, and all my extracurricular interests had readied me for this moment. Even stranger was that the Hilux High-Lift that I was previously totally uninterested in was still there. It was going for even less than the Egress, and for that kind of money I could have it finished with full electronics – but no, I wanted a Bruiser! As if to firmly put my cards on the table: “I’ll pay for it in full.” What am I doing?! The shop owner started to smile. That definitely lifted his spirits, too! The trip home was an odd mix of elation and fear: I needed a third project like I needed to get hit by a truck, let alone a big, expensive truck that could be worth more than everything I was working on to that point. In my heart, though, I knew I made the right decision, and celebrated my ability to enjoy my hobby in a way I have never done previously. The rest is a short story: having ordered it on a Friday, it arrived on the Monday, and by Tuesday – stopping to retrieve it from the shop during my regular errands – I had it in my hands. First Impressions Well, I had it in my arms, anyway: this box was massive! I had no idea just how large it was until I brought it home, and realized it was almost the width of the doorways in the house! When viewing box art for a kit online, it is easy to forget that the image is nearly the size of the box itself (though not true for some new releases with the “post-box-style” box front). In the case of the Bruiser, that means a large image indeed, and fine details really jump out at the viewer when looking at a box like this in person – this was the impression I was getting. One side of the box: Picture quality at this point was not great, mostly because I did not have a lot of time to take them before I had to find a place for it and continue on with my day. I have yet to even open the box! However, I can at least see what the chassis might look like when assembled: And in detail: The gearbox, which is likely the most compelling feature of this truck, gets another detail on the side, in addition to the inlaid image on the front: And then I had to set it aside. I can only wait so long, though! Planning the Build If you managed to read my lengthy story about how I got to wanting and finding a Bruiser, you would understand why I want to savour this build. I really wish I could go for the speed record, but I anticipate I will be putting in assemblies in a piecemeal fashion. Unlike previous projects, I do have all my supplies purchased at this preliminary stage, from electronics to paint to accessories. Hence, if deliveries are smooth, I should be able to make good time while still enjoying this build. Those electronics will consist of a Futaba 4YWD Attack 2.4 GHz radio and two 6-kg generic waterproof metal gear servos – which will be replaced by a Traxxas 2056 and a Futaba S3003 in the odd event that I fit servos in the build before the intended units arrive, or if their performance is unsatisfactory. I will look to fit one of my Tamiya TBLE-02S units but will soon have the luxury of an Axial AE-5L ESC with LED output. That will allow me to fit at least headlights and taillights immediately, though I had intended it for another build… That being said, I did read on this forum somewhere that one should not skimp on electronics for a Bruiser, and I am inclined to agree! That Axial ESC might make its way into the truck yet. I have yet to see a Tamiya 3-speed sporting a battery under 4 000 mAh capacity, and presently have no working batteries of that specification (maximum 3 000 mAh, and well-used), so it looks like there is in fact one more thing I need. I could get a proper-capacity battery while ordering another Axial ESC, I suppose! As was the case with my Lancia 037 4WD-H, I intend to find a moderate stand between scale realism and the model’s radio-controlled nature. While I am interested in adding things like door panels and a driver figure to the interior, a large part of the Bruiser’s appeal to me is its realism in its drivetrain, so I will be content to run it with a few concessions to scale presence as opposed to all-out authenticity. Besides, the latter would require more LEDs and the MFC-02… My Lancia 037 4WD-H has also taught me that too much complexity is possible in a model, so the emphasis will be on producing a running vehicle, though one with some attention paid to aesthetics. It is still not enough to convince me that I should use Stealth body mounts (it’s an RC car, and RC cars use body posts and clips – I can live with that), but enough for me to at least attempt to produce a neat paint job – the static modeller in me is still alive somewhere! Since I cannot afford a used vehicle, and therefore by association a classic Hilux 4 x 4, I have elected to pay tribute to it with a Czech-made custom step-side rear bed. Doing so means I will be unable to use the bed topper that is standard in the Bruiser kit, and I will need to do some drilling and cutting for this custom bed to fit the chassis. Roll bar options for the 122 mm width of the rear bed seem to be limited – thankfully, I have an assortment of styrene tubes and rods on the way, which could enable me to build one from scratch. As before, I will be adding a driver figure and hopefully some simple styrene cuts serving as door panels. I am seriously entertaining adding a passenger – I was previously intrigued by the possibility of reworking a resin figure kit into a seated passenger, but the expense and detail are too high for the purpose I have in mind. As such, any passenger will almost certainly be a reworked 4 x 4 driver figure – though the extent of the “rework” remains to be seen… The chassis will be stock – having a Bruiser is enough of a novelty for me to be happy with its stock performance for a little while. If I feel the need to upgrade, chances are I would find a higher-turn brushed motor for it first, and even then, that might suffice. Paint is at this point going to be mainly TS-43 Racing Green. If I elect for graphic accents, I will add stripes in TS-26 Pure White and TS-8 Italian Red, as an homage to my previous Avante Black Special and Astute hybrid – I had forgotten how popular those designs were when they made their debuts and feel that this combination could work on a truck like this. Even if it does not, it works for me! The Last Word – for Now Going through literature, accounts, and reviews of the Bruiser, as well as the depth and breadth of custom projects involving the model, has made me realize that I know precious little about trucks and their culture. Knowledge at this point might be dangerous, since it could compel me to spend even more money on accessories (how about that K5 Blazer shell from RC4WD?!), but anything I can learn about pickup trucks, show trucks, mud/bog racing trucks, and any combination thereof will be interesting to me. It feels a world removed from my regular research on rally racers, sports prototypes, and other genres, and it gives me something else to look forward to as I start this exciting RC adventure. “Yes, [I’m] really in Hog Heaven [now that I] own a Bruiser!” – Tamiya promotional spot, c. 1985
  23. Hello all I'm trying to locate some original Tamiya 6V 4000MaH batteries as used in the Blazer, preferably boxed. Please let me know if you have any and are willing to sell (let me know how much you want for them) - thanks Rich
  24. Dear racers, builders and collectors To BEC or not to BEC... THAT is the question... :/ I have recently joined your wonderful club, mainly because I fell in love with Tamiya and all the wonders and joys of RC's again. So, like many I had the Grasshopper as a kid and nostalgia made me reinvest in the reissued version which was a great joy to build as well as owning it once more. Since that time, I've bought the HotShot, Neo Fighter and a few others. The latest is Monster Beetle, however, since it's been a while since I built one again, I noticed my Carson's Reflex Wheel Ultimate Touch 2.4G's (this is the one Carson Reflex-Wheel-Ultimate) has a BEC that is a bit hard to find these days and anywhere I find it costs a bundle not to mention the shipping costs is astronomical. I need one so I may bind the Monster Beetle to my Remote Controller, I have the HotShot, Neo Fighter to bind perfectly, but I am now looking for another BEC to put into the Monster Beetle and maybe even upgrade my Grasshopper for the same reason. I have found these, which I don't know will bind with my Reflex Wheel Ultimate Touch Remote Controller: Carson 500501533 - Reflex Wheel Receiver PRO 3, 2.4 GHz Press for Info and this one Carson 500501536 - empfangerrefle xwheel Pro3, 2.4 GHz V.2 Press for Info My question and hope here is to have someone explain to me if this is a possibility that my controller will bind with these two or do I explicitly need the one that came with the controller like this one (Sorry no image only description), or can I simply buy any of the above mentioned alternatives and they will bind with the remote controller without problems? I sure hope you guys might have an answer to this, it's a little frustrating as I'm still not entirely sure how these things work, I had tons of problems with brushless non-brushless Tamiya ESC, I couldn't figure out the differences and it didn't work... I'm sure I did something wrong, heck it took me three hours to put the Grasshopper's rubber wheels together... when I was a kid, I did it in 20min... I don't know what that means, but let's just leave it at that... I hope you guys can help me cause I'm at a loss here, I wish to buy it via Amazon, if possible, but since they don't have the one I use exactly I was hoping I might be able to use one of these. Here is the manual for the Controller from Carson I use for the RC's I have. User Manual for the Carson Reflex Wheel Ultimate Touch The one place I found that might be okay but I don't know them, never ordered from them is this one: The Alternative however, the shipping is kind of a stab in the feelers, but, if this is the only place I can get it, or Tamico, then I guess I have to buy it... but please let me know if I can use those from amazon. Thanks a lot guys PS. Sorry guys for some reason, it posted my topic twice...
  25. A New Build! It has been a long time coming, but it is now time for a build thread as I tackle the: I have waited a long time for this model, cutting back in other areas of my finances to keep the pre-order I applied for a long time ago. Naturally, then, I am beyond excited to have an example in my hands. Such is my excitement that I can write an incredibly boring piece about my ruminations of both the Lancia 037 and Tamiya's equivalents On the Lancia 037, 58040, 58278, and 58654 The Lancia 037 is a vehicle that holds a special place in my heart. On the face of it, the 037 is a mid-engine rally machine, a sportscar that can tackle rough roads. It does so with a unique style and flair, with its Italian styling and heritage rooted in the country that produces some of the most soul-stirring automobiles ever made. Perhaps Tamiya did not think of this when they first produced a version of the 037, marketed as the Lancia Rally. As we know, this was an odd contraption, capturing the body’s lines perfectly while parking it on top of quite an awkward-looking chassis. Handling depended on who you ask and what motor you left in there, but the superb shell was difficult to preserve under less-than-careful driving. Today, we remember Lancia’s 037 as the last rear-wheel drive car to win the World Rally Championship for Makes, defeating the nascent Audi Quattro and its four-wheel drive, with supercharging, to paraphrase 037 pilot Markku Alen. We remember it as a beautiful little racer stuck somewhere between the radical Stratos and the terrifying Delta S4, not as accomplished as its angular predecessor and not as memorably intimidating as its successor. It never even had a name outside of its project number. We remember Tamiya’s Lancia Rally quite differently, it seems, and its legacy is a little more divisive. Many bemoan its mediocre handling, fragile shell, and unusual proportions, while others praise its wonderfully detailed body, genuine off-road capability, and unusual proportions. In 2001, Tamiya addressed the non-scale appearance of the original Lancia Rally in a re-release. Now known as the Lancia 037 Rally as on the box, this offering kept the superb shell, added some more detail parts, and placed it on a much more proportionally-correct touring car chassis. While this version lost much of the off-road ability of the original, especially as the special TA-03R-S chassis was a belt-driven one, it definitely looked more serious – even if an oversized bumper was issued with the re-release, like the original’s massive bush guard… 17 years later, and Tamiya has re-released the re-release. The proportionally-correct Lancia 037 Rally has made a reappearance, this time on a shaft-driven TA-02S chassis. The excellent shell and detail parts return, and so does a large snow plow bumper! The last-named still works well to avoid crash damage like that which the great Henri Toivonen encountered with his Lancia… Grastens and Tamiya's Lancias It was through the original-style Lancia Rally that the 037 made its way into my collection. I fell in love with it for its genuine off-road capability – like the Subaru Brat and Tamiya Frog that shared its chassis design – and its lovely detailed body shell. With the swoopy Martini stripes and the big rally spotlights sitting atop an aggressively jacked-up chassis, it looked like it was from outer space. The re-release of the Frog and Subaru Brat also meant that parts were readily available, as were upgrades that improved the original’s driving characteristics. A fast car that can run on rough roads, with easy maintenance and good parts support… It was the rally car I had dreamed of! This was in 2014, which was well after the first re-release 037 was discontinued - to say nothing of the original! At the time, I figured I would never be able to acquire a re-release, and for some time did not want to. The original had that useful ground clearance and actual rear-wheel drive, two traits that endeared it to me over the four-wheel drive touring car-based iteration. Yet by 2017, my Lancia was no longer in running condition, and my enthusiasm for the hobby as a whole had diminished. I had to sell off much of my equipment to fund life, among them my Lancia's bodywork. By reigniting my passion for radio-controlled cars, the latest 037 saved my hobby career. Much of my enthusiasm came from seeing the venerable Lancia being given the re-release treatment, from the new box to the updated photos. Some of it came from the fact that the new chassis for the car was a sealed shaft-driven type, which I figured would be much better for the off-road running I wanted to tackle with such a car. Even limited experience with a belt-driven TA-04 was enough for me to harbour doubts about a belt-driven machine in those conditions. Most importantly, it was a car I had come to adore, emerging at a price well below my expectations for such a fantastic little machine. It simply got me excited again. I placed my pre-order, held course, and finally saw it delivered to my country, where it was dispatched quickly. First Impressions Many people have reservations about the smaller boxes and the unattractive packaging of the re-releases compared to the blister packs of the original models, but I for one love the subsequent savings on shipping. The box was small and sleek: The offsets look off in this box schematic, but consistent with the box art. Many 037s did have their wheels well tucked into the arches. What intrigues me more is the listed wheelbase of 236 mm; I had committed the figure of 237 mm long enough for me to find this particular detail odd, however inconsequential: Was this a detail on the first re-release's box? FCA was not around back then, but Lancia and Martini sure were: The packing is efficient and compact. I had difficulty replicating it following my examination of the contents: And here is the first layer of parts from the box: The second layer I extracted had many of the plastic chassis parts and some body detail pieces: Instructions, decals, and metal hardware can be found near or at the bottom: The decal sheet looks identical to the earlier re-release's, but I had never seen that before and was intrigued by the dashboard decals for the cockpit set at first: The story of me selling my original Lancia Rally shell has an important catch: I sold the one I finished, but had a spare body set. Initially keeping it for spares - I anticipated the worst for what was my most frequent runner - I dug it out to reaffirm everything I knew about the differences between the original and re-release bodies: I assume it is normal for the original shell to have a slightly more yellow plastic The enthusiasm generated by this new Lancia has inspired me to finish my original one; such is the power of this special model. Planning the Build I will likely be building this car up out of sequence, as I have an international order of ball bearings on the way and not enough spares to outfit the entire car. I will be sure to outline steps I follow for specific parts and their places in the manual. The same delay applies to light sets; however I also anticipate that acquiring paint and having good painting conditions will be difficult. Hence, the bodywork may only occur much later. I will be provisioning supplies to finish two bodies while I sort out my original Lancia Rally. It might receive some coverage in this build, but the focus will be on the re-release. Accordingly, I intend to finish the original in box-art Martini Racing livery. This leaves the re-release open to some customization. As for that customization: lots of lovely paint schemes exist for this car, but without custom printing I will either be repeating the box-art Martini livery, piecing together decals for a 1986 Bastos-Texaco racer, finishing up Markku Alen's 1985 Portugal test car, or finally getting Adobe Illustrator and commissioning a printer for a nice set of Jolly Club/Totip decals, courtesy of TamiyaClub's own firefoxussr If I have the time and resources, I have several other liveries from the 1983 season in mind, which I may detail later if they come up as an option. I selected 1983 as I do not feel like parting with the rear bumper (Evo.2 Lancia 037s appeared from 1984 onward, which omitted the rear bumper for practicality). Resources permitting, I also hope to construct an engine bay and roll cage for the model, the first real scratch-building project I will undertake! I hope I can exercise enough restraint to get those finished before abandoning it all to thrash the finished car... The Last Word - For Now If you have read this far: congratulations, and thank you for taking the time to read my thoughts If not: I can hardly blame you. All you need to know is that I am really excited for this model! In any case, I look forward to commencing the build!
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