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Juggular

How would you get this off?

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This is an upside-down chair.  I've been trying to remove this gas lift for a few hours now...

I've been using this chair for 25 years, but suddenly it would sink and won't come back up.

qF1L93X.jpg

The legs came off, and I have a replacement gas-lift.  

mYUZjEm.jpg

I just need the old cylinder removed.  From what I could tell, it's not welded or anything, it's just press-fitted. 

G3d8PHT.jpg

I unscrewed the base to hammer the cylinder from inside.  But there is no access.  The metal base covers the tip completely. 

dvXI2wW.jpg

Not only that, it seems like there is another hole that's holding the cylinder from inside. Another sheet metal is rivetted under it to support, so the cylinder would be mounted straight.  I've sprayed WD40 to penetrate, but I don't think it would reach the second layer.  I can't get a good angle on the inside to spray.  

UQS67HH.jpg

I've been trying to twist it with that vice-grip thingy, but no luck.  I've also hammered the stem left and right, hoping that it would come loose.  It's a big hammer, but it won't budge.  Is it stuck forever?  Should I give up and get a new chair? 

I don't want to replace a chair every 2-3 years. What would be a good chair that could last a decade or two?  

 

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I bet it's got something to do with those 4 rivets. Drill those out and take it apart further. It looks like the tube is flanged out inside the plate, so it might be near impossible to remove from the direction you're going.

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1 hour ago, Juggular said:

I've been using this chair for 25 years

Looks like it got butt-welded :)

Assuming the plan is to discard the gas-lift after removal and that you are ok with destroying it, you could:

  • Remove the metal base from the seat and see if that grants you access to the interior of the stuck shaft
  • If that doesn't get you access, cut the shaft so that you now have access to its interior
  • From the inside, carefully cut/file a slot along its side, basically make the stuck cylinder cross-section a "c" shape
  • Once you have the "c" shape, it should loose its grip. If it doesn't then a few taps with a hammer should do the trick
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Thank you everyone!

I've been hammering with this thing for a good long while, and it finally came loose. Never in my life, did I have to brute-force anything like this chair. (What kind of a hammer is this anyway? It's too big for nails. How did it end up in my possession?)  

7fgDRUl.jpg

If the new gas-lift lasts another 25 years, I'll be all set.  

 

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2 hours ago, Juggular said:

(What kind of a hammer is this anyway? It's too big for nails. How did it end up in my possession?)  

7fgDRUl.jpg

 

 

That looks to be a sledge hammer, and it's made for demolition, and breaking rocks.

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5 hours ago, Juggular said:

(What kind of a hammer is this anyway?

I've used things like this in auto mechanics believe it or not. Sometimes referred to jokingly as the "Ford-Tool".  Also similar to Thor's hammer, Mjolnir.

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5 hours ago, Juggular said:

Thank you everyone!

I've been hammering with this thing for a good long while, and it finally came loose. Never in my life, did I have to brute-force anything like this chair. (What kind of a hammer is this anyway? It's too big for nails. How did it end up in my possession?)  

7fgDRUl.jpg

If the new gas-lift lasts another 25 years, I'll be all set.  

 

That my friend is a Birmingham screwdriver 

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This gas lift problem is just begging for a slide hammer:

spacer.png

This made pulling the front CV axles from my car's transaxle a million times easier.  Slipped the fork behind the CV joint, slammed the weight against the ball stop on the shaft, and after a few hits the stub popped loose.  With the correct size fork, I imagine this tool would work just as well knocking an old gas cylinder out of a chair seat.

 

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