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48 minutes ago, TurnipJF said:

Instead of a second servo, could you perhaps mount a bellcrank on the rear shock tower, then run a pushrod from that forwards to allow both sets of steering to be operated from a single servo? You could adjust the rear steering rate by changing the pushrod position on the bellcrank.

I like the idea.  @Ziddan had a similar comment. Know if any specific Tamiya car / part number?  Can also look at aftermarket as well as parts as I don’t want to spend too much money 😬.  May also need to upgrade the servo to be stronger if I link the front with the rear.  
I wish I had a 3D printer as this would have been a lot easier. 
 

If not 2 servo works as I can disable the rear servo via transmitter.

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47 minutes ago, Ziddan said:

In my pic im using the stock dampers and most likely you have some of those laying about, they seem alright IMO.

For sure smaller cups on both the diff side and hub side will allow for more droop, front arms were ok for me but for my the back ones i printed new arms that have more space for the cups so i could get some droop there.

Yes, actually 2 pairs of ugly yellow dampers as I picked up 2 sets of TT-02B for the 4WS.   Planned on using original dampers as spare for my son’s TT-02B as I already purchased the Xspeed metal ones.  
 

Looking at shorter towers with the metal Xspeed 90mm dampers to get max height.  I like the longer dampers look, but the gap between the chassis and the body is unattractive. The shorter towers will close this gap and jack up the suspension.  Higher center of gravity but it should be worth it 🤗

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4 hours ago, Frankster said:

gap between the chassis and the body is unattractive.

I feel that, its specifically why i designed the shorter shock tower for my rear, to get to the body lower.

As for getting together some crankydoo for the rears from the front:

I think you could use some more spacers to use the holes for the prop shaft hold down or stack on top of the center of the two steering links to put a bracket for holding an L shaped part, one side connecting to the servo, the other having holes so you can pick the throw for the rear steering.

Then having a similar one on the back of the  shock tower to move the level on the rear steering connected to the front via a rod.

ADDITION: tho i think having a separate servo to allow for crab steering would be cooler and a lot easier to set up mecanically, the suggestion above is starting to become a lot of linkages :P

uYsK77B.png

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Not too long ago I saw a video by a chap who had set up a TT-02 as a drifter. To move the centre of gravity forward, he basically turned the chassis around through 180 degrees, making the back the front and the front the back, so that the motor was just behind what was now the front axle. To make what would normally be the back wheels steerable, he used an M-05 steering rack which features an integrated bellcrank, mounted on short standoffs using two of the screw holes that keep the spur gear cover in place. To keep the track rods parallel with the suspension arms, he used another pair of standoffs at the outer ball links. The steering servo was mounted in the standard location, and linked to the steering rack with a pushrod. Once it was all together, it looked factory.

I have been trying to find the video on YouTube, but it has eluded me so far. I will post a link if I can find it.

 

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1 hour ago, TurnipJF said:

Not too long ago I saw a video by a chap who had set up a TT-02 as a drifter. To move the centre of gravity forward, he basically turned the chassis around through 180 degrees, making the back the front and the front the back, so that the motor was just behind what was now the front axle. To make what would normally be the back wheels steerable, he used an M-05 steering rack which features an integrated bellcrank, mounted on short standoffs using two of the screw holes that keep the spur gear cover in place. To keep the track rods parallel with the suspension arms, he used another pair of standoffs at the outer ball links. The steering servo was mounted in the standard location, and linked to the steering rack with a pushrod. Once it was all together, it looked factory.

I have been trying to find the video on YouTube, but it has eluded me so far. I will post a link if I can find it.

 

Awesome. I had looked into this on my MF01x but couldn't see a way to make it work. My idea was to have a mini XV01 style racer. Will keep thinking about it, but I feel it would need a few 3D printed parts etc which is beyond me.

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5 hours ago, TurnipJF said:

Not too long ago I saw a video by a chap who had set up a TT-02 as a drifter. To move the centre of gravity forward, he basically turned the chassis around through 180 degrees, making the back the front and the front the back, so that the motor was just behind what was now the front axle. To make what would normally be the back wheels steerable, he used an M-05 steering rack which features an integrated bellcrank, mounted on short standoffs using two of the screw holes that keep the spur gear cover in place. To keep the track rods parallel with the suspension arms, he used another pair of standoffs at the outer ball links. The steering servo was mounted in the standard location, and linked to the steering rack with a pushrod. Once it was all together, it looked factory.

I have been trying to find the video on YouTube, but it has eluded me so far. I will post a link if I can find it.

 

Yes please!   Let me know if you find the video.  This should be easier in a TT-02B chassis with more space under a beetle shell.  
 

On a regular TT-02 this would be hard as the rear wheels hit the motor chassis area.  There does not appear to be clearance for the wheel Turing radius but interested to see how it was build. 

In the drifting scene, is it better to have the motor in the front?

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8 hours ago, Frankster said:

In the drifting scene, is it better to have the motor in the front?

Less weight on the back=less grip on the back=easier tail whip is my guess.

Or more weight up front=more scale weight distribution.

 

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14 hours ago, Frankster said:

In the drifting scene, is it better to have the motor in the front?

Not anymore. That's a pretty outdated concept. About 10 years ago, when drift cars were still 4WD and without any overdrive gears that used to be a trick to reduce understeer and get the car to rotate around the front wheels. The trend currently is actually read-mid or rear motor layouts, and in some cases with the motor mounted up high too. Have a quick google for Kashagari-Style and you'll be amazed by the chassis layouts. This is all in the pursuit of weight transfer and realistic body roll and suspension movement.

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Before @Ziddan suggested to extend the dampers, I started to look at changing to factory front damper towers to get the ground clearance.   Overall it worked and looks great with the 90mm dampers.  Low and sleek.

Problem was after putting on the beetle body the dampers look wimpy.  I will convert back to tall rear dampers for both front and rear axles. 
42140CEA-54DD-4310-986A-3A7E037539B6.jpeg.8ebb0661213b3e75f0f2f9226d592e62.jpeg38B7822D-F927-48EB-8D9B-F761695EB582.jpeg.1e7a54d5dfd7a9fe3f8ea428b9eb4e04.jpeg5B4648A4-477D-4DEE-95BF-D227C54519C6.jpeg.7fd5299a83fe310c91da5d3a1795da03.jpeg
Revised steering is smooth and effortless in the rear.22138071-A1DC-467C-A301-2B7F6E824402.jpeg.72c6fa84631e7bc8118c9d0743582f2f.jpegDEFFB485-F3E3-4594-9787-09C7F32A1F87.jpeg.c7be66743d2ff534d38b99f505ffb800.jpeg

Clearance is very tight between body, dampers and upper arm71EE6731-A973-4D5F-8059-14FCF3ABDD3D.jpeg.f107a7a010537760112758f8f8b0e532.jpeg0C915AFA-78E5-497A-976B-1A97178F488C.jpeg.6a62628a1155e64a2abb2a807701fdba.jpeg15282642-96B7-4346-95C6-8429B0BAD9B3.jpeg.4c5a2a42f9f9e85af0c195e33bb794ed.jpeg

To get rid of the issue of the dampers not working smoothly, I cut and filed away the original mounting holes, drilled the through the lower arm and added a M3 nylon thread nut.  This made the top and bottom of the damper more inline.   Overall damper rebound is smoother

Front steering was binding from the taller ride height.  Had to add a spacer to the front knuckles and also added a washer under the steering assembly.

693E21B0-F9C5-4BE1-B0F3-B825317838D3.jpeg.c95e2e598be5f4621306b47103e7693c.jpeg

511F2EE5-AAF2-45C0-8052-64E648CF2A4D.jpeg

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Next I need to figure out a frame to hold the rear servo.  I checked and there is plenty of space under the large body.  Thinking of using battery stay hole and the one on the right side to hold the motor shield61FB90CA-B93D-4274-BFA3-FC61E77089D4.jpeg.e92d4d090e8eb6f21d01caf91acdc05d.jpeg

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On 4/15/2022 at 10:17 AM, Ziddan said:

If you have some more m3 spacers and threaded rod you might extend the damper rods before attaching the eyelets that bolt to the lower arms.

Here is my tt02b with extended eyelets, more ride height:

FrontExtendedEyelets.jpg.e718bb61230a852a0c2147ad7e0b94e3.jpg

Looks amazing with the body on :)

So I put back the rear dampers on the front and rear axles.  With the suspension fully extended I will need 100mm dampers for front and 110 for rear (longer because they are on a angle).  This Is compared to the factory 90mm dampers I currently have.  Extended eyelets may be too much to make up for the 20mm difference.   Already eying new 110mm dampers on all 4 corners

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Installed 110mm dampers. They are crawler dampers and do not work with oil.   Learned the hard way.   Much skinnier but at least did not cost too much.   I am spoiled by the girth of typical Tamiya CVA dampers but this is a nice change. 1208A399-A96A-4ED6-AB38-75184B6C958B.jpeg.f66c8fb8a88d0a954a74e2bc44007788.jpeg339E57AE-70E8-4F20-A4EC-5F651E314267.jpeg.9b316bf9609602e8ec086916146617b4.jpeg7AB837FC-DE1B-4086-9116-4DC3DDDAFB85.jpeg.285ec6cd4f9157524c5bdb10c6d8c4ac.jpeg

The ground clearance is now 48mm +\-
82C317E6-D899-4219-9169-0B2238DBE5EC.jpeg.1452c11337aa2cc8de978f303c438267.jpeg
The taller ride height relives the track width.   Less a Beetle Blitzer and more a Stadium Truck now…ACD9E66B-C8EA-4726-AD49-3EA286AFBD9B.jpeg.7f61a30eb1a683f57fdf4d29c6bcd15c.jpeg

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2:40am now and a major breakthrough.  The last update was over 7 weeks ago and fixed a major roadblock.   Biggest problem was connecting the rear servo to the rear steering assembly.  Many options were review and 3D printed with the help of @Ziddan

A. Existing factory damper tower

B. Tamiya carbon damper tower

C. 3D printed.  Scale was off

D. 3D printed  same as C but at proper scale

E. Same as D but with larger opening for proposed bell crank

F. @Ziddan suggesting to have opening to hold the servo.  This works but I wanted to make the damper towers corners lower to give the car more ground clearance.

G1 / G2 are the same   G1 is rear tower for servo, G2 front tower did not need opening for a servo.  


Overall many trial and errors to get to this point (not to mention the costs for 3D printing)

677372FC-9BF0-4EDC-94CA-FA47DDAED245.thumb.jpeg.41ec5897a3ebc04555b629dcf5f44324.jpeg

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Close up

22819FDA-DF84-4B7B-9CA4-7153F2631DA1.jpeg.d2a1997207041e2755177f4f114034c2.jpeg059C5479-05B8-4006-A222-6F8F59B541ED.jpeg.df92733e1c597a14e39e852ce7b6dcad.jpeg

4 wheel steering in action

Front wheels

3C220498-0033-4183-BDB0-06EF9D7E9E05.jpeg.df6ff51601135c364e3a4dfc6451cd9b.jpeg
Rear wheels9E39BFDA-5EF0-40E0-8E34-C6EE2B6A4347.jpeg.42fe66ac2ad31a8e41aae8b169a1c755.jpeg

Crab mode5B2FB7FB-AEAC-4221-A00A-83954DD22406.jpeg.b934c4ce528adab98d79258d65a831df.jpeg

Tight turn00684769-6F6F-4711-9DEF-9F4AB26B08E3.jpeg.e926ecf39c2e6f698601053231ebfe2f.jpeg

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Next step, need to find solution to mount the body to the chassis.  Overall it is a mix of Blitzer and Monster5112BCA8-B0F2-42C4-B9DB-D05602A0F660.jpeg.20456229ac083b9e140b2ccc9558bab2.jpegE748ACEE-424A-4118-ACBA-54BB15B60C5C.jpeg.772058ce86a5572ea3bea8e215035716.jpeg867BFDCC-7EAD-4728-A9C6-67DE810785AC.jpeg.2ad70ff7d9cbce96f91ef672436237b8.jpeg

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I love the look of it with those tires, may have to pick some up for my tt02b beetle as well :)

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It been a long time since my last update.  Summer family vacation and pondering how to mount the body to the chassis have been issues I have been dealing with.   The body post for abs plastics is smaller than the polycarbonate bodies.  Many thanks to @Re-Bugged for Monster Beetle body post parts.  

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In the end I had to add braces to make the body posts work.  I wanted to keep the mounting holes to be the same as my Monster Beetle allowing me to swap bodies depending on my mood. As mention this took a long time to figure out.  In the end I used aftermarket metal body posts from another famous abs boy car, the Lunch Box. 
100E7716-4CD0-49BC-A9D5-A1A1F1DA1D2B.thumb.jpeg.21c2169c8c9acda81fda5a3060b1ff42.jpeg

As you can see I added a few alum braces to transfer the connection.  The lateral piece is too short and will be cutting a longer piece before The longitudinal brace uses the existing holes in the gearbox cover.  It is used in TT-02B buggy for body post mounts. 

94E371D5-94E4-49BE-801E-EFE6B7C81D44.thumb.jpeg.aa481847ec0ff9c4e56ef537cb1b5990.jpeg9DB4D8A3-3447-49DE-8D30-CC336C6E6843.thumb.jpeg.8981ddb3d528b642f3af6b47bca0bef9.jpeg

The longitudinal alum flat bar brace uses the existing holes in the gearbox cover.  The holes are used for body post mounts in the TT02B  

76D23C83-CEBC-4189-BD6F-804EFFE5BC31.thumb.jpeg.92695901a0cd9071a81f66272f922091.jpeg
New 3D printed damper tower in the front to match rear but without the opening for a servo.  Not sure about the temp placement for the servo at the moment but there is lots of room in the beetle shell 

93FDFFEB-9C73-4AD9-959E-563D1CCF30AF.thumb.jpeg.f76a3ebdef01dec77e54944303fa2592.jpeg

I cleaned up the rear steering with proper length turnbuckles

ADDADDF7-4C3F-4CC2-BCC6-8545DC89150C.thumb.jpeg.cd928a58fbf5da5f52b3a21f4742d243.jpeg
Next step is to finish soldering the motor wires

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Its so clean!

Very good way of getting the body on, monster style mounts will eliminate a lot of rattling and keep it sitting firmly.

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