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Mrowka

Why lexan scissors?

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Why? Why? Why?

I have always heard that it is Very Bad to use scissors other than special lexan scissors to cut lexan, but when I was cutting scrap lexan for paint samples I used a pair of Harbor Freight Special scissors and they seemed to work just as well.

What am I not getting here?

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For straights, I just use ordinary kitchen scissors. For curves, I use curve nail scissors. There are some who will insist you use specialist (expensive) everything. Really it is through trial and error to find the best thing to use. 

One example from the static model world, someone discovered ordinary and cheap floor polish is the best gloss finish ever, better than any expensive specialist gloss paint "for" models. 

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I have some Yeah Racing curved scissors which were about $3 from memory, because I didn't have any other similar things lying around. So i use normal scissors for straights and the curved ones for curves. They are much easier to use as they are smaller so its just easier to cut without getting caught up by the body. I would like some similar straight ones but they don't seem to exist.

Its funny though how expensive they can be, to get muchmore or kyosho branded its multiples of the price. Specialist tools generally work better, i use my body reamer all the time but the price put me off initially. Then I checked banggood and it was about $5. Have seen them up to $50!

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It’s not really a case of have to use them more a case of it makes life easier. I use a combination of straight scissors for straight runs, curved lexan ( not terribly expensive) for fiddly bits and a sharp blade or circle cutter for big curves. Have just ordered a finger tip craft knife to try out.

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FWIW I got my mitts on a couple of fingertip craft knives as well.

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I use a combination of a pair of German kitchen scissors, curved scissors for polycarbonate bodies, utility knife, 2 different files, Exacto type Olfa knife,Olga circle cutter, but mostly hope when cutting my polycarbonate bodies.. :ph34r:

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On 6/27/2022 at 2:07 AM, Mrowka said:

have always heard that it is Very Bad to use scissors other than special lexan scissors to cut lexan

BS! Who told ya that? :blink:

Use anything you like that works for your task. Blades, scalpel, side/diag cutters, compass cutter, reamer/drill, dremel... jeez some ppl even use a soldering iron -_-

Good specialized scissors for hacking lexan would have high leverage & maybe a straight and curved versions.

Generally need multiple tools. But if you were forced to trim a shell with only ONE tool, you’d choose the knife blade. 

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On 6/27/2022 at 2:54 AM, Jonathon Gillham said:

I would like some similar straight ones but they don't seem to exist.

if you happen to know any friends who are hospital nurses working in OT... see if they can snaffle you some surg snips ;) 

14000-13-front-c.jpg

Tons of nice stainless surg tools are all “disposable” & get chucked after being unwrapped - even if they never get touched during that surgery. What a waste. 

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1 hour ago, WillyChang said:

if you happen to know any friends who are hospital nurses working in OT... see if they can snaffle you some surg snips ;) 

14000-13-front-c.jpg

Tons of nice stainless surg tools are all “disposable” & get chucked after being unwrapped - even if they never get touched during that surgery. What a waste. 

Those are also found in first aid kits (not the few plasters types). Expired first aid kits can be a good source for them too. 

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1 hour ago, alvinlwh said:

Those are also found in first aid kits (not the few plasters types). Expired first aid kits can be a good source for them too. 

I guess some "professional" first aid kits may have high quality scissors included, but surgical scissors are of a much higher quality than any scissors I've ever seen in first aid kits. One of my my ex girlfriends is a veterinarian and during our relationship, she gave me some surgical scissors after I had complained about how quickly the relatively expensive Tamiya decal scissors would wear out. At 2-300 Euro, I would never have bought scissors like that, but after using them for some time, I realized that they are worth it. I've mostly cut lexan and stickers with them and haven't been careful, and after 10+ years, they are still virtually like new. Highly recommended!

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12 hours ago, WillyChang said:

BS! Who told ya that? :blink:

Use anything you like that works for your task. Blades, scalpel, side/diag cutters, compass cutter, reamer/drill, dremel... jeez some ppl even use a soldering iron -_-

Good specialized scissors for hacking lexan would have high leverage & maybe a straight and curved versions.

Generally need multiple tools. But if you were forced to trim a shell with only ONE tool, you’d choose the knife blade. 

That’s a good point re long leverage. The Tamiya curved ones I have, have short heavy blades but long handles in ratio to the blade length. I think the one thing that does make a difference is sharpness. I try to use a fresh blade if I’m scoring and snapping and I make sure the scissors are clean and free off anything stuck on the blades( sticker residue etc) A quick rub with alcohol helps. That’s the tools not me!!!!

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Everyone here has their own experiences when it comes to cutting out Lexan bodies.

I remember buying two extra Lexan scissors. One straight and one curved. I used them once and they've just been lying around ever since.
I completely scratched the first body from inside when cutting curves.

And since then I've only used my scalpel, scoring the body and break out the pieces.
After that I take my time and sand it until it is perfect for me.

But there is probably no right or wrong here. Everyone has to do what is best for them.

Edit: I remember referring to this guy from Youtube:

 

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