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Clodbuster Advice - keep it stock (ish) or mod right away?

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Hi All,

Looking for some advice on a new Clod build. I am interested in starting with a mostly stock build and modifying from there so I can appreciate all the individual improvements (vs just going all out from the very first moment). However, I am worried that the actual stock performance is so bad that it is not even worth starting at stock, and maybe I should put in a few upgrades even during the initial build.

If you were to build a clod "mostly" stock, but were willing to put in an initial set of modifications, what would they be? I have no trouble cutting into the chassis (saw one vid about that) or performing other serious mods if warranted.

Thanks!

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I’ve got a stocker Clod that I have not really modded that I do enjoy running. The only mods I did was to swap the servo horn and remove the rubber shock bump stops and I do enjoy the character of it. It’s a thing that everyone should have at least one run of in stock form.

Its not a savagely complicated thing to work on so any mods you choose to do from there will usually be simple enough to fit.

I really should put the wheels on it and check it still runs properly before the winter fully sets in as it’s a riot in the snow!

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When I was building my super clodbuster the steering rods bend so easily. I went for parts from ukmonsters website I have the on axle steering, rear lock out, carbon centre chassis brace, front bumper. i recommend steering rods if you want one upgrade.

IMG_0625.jpeg

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On my Bullhead, I've gone for the 860 esc (880 now I think), a pair of 15t Firebolts and 2nd hand T Maxx shocks (lighter oil), so far.....

My next mod, would be twin servos, as the servo savers are quite weak (thought about stronger springs..🤔

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I tend to let the screws decide whether the mods are going on during the initial build or later. If they mount with the same type of thread, there is no harm in undoing the stock parts and attaching the modded ones. However if the threads are different, I prefer to tap the thread that is going to be used in the long-term, rather than changing threads in the same hole.

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My advice would be to build and run "mostly stock" - the non-stock bits being bearings, steel pinions, metal anti-rotation bracket, 880 ESC and a high-torque servo.  Tighten down the steering springs as much as you can, and install the rear steering links to give the least possible steering.  Due to forces acting on it, you'll probably still get more steering at the rear anyway.  That way you get to experience the stock clod at its very best.

I have one exactly like this, it doesn't get run a lot (to be fair neither do any of my other monsters) but it's got all that unique 80s Tamiya charm that we know and love.

From here, you know where you can go.  IMO the biggest improvement without ruining the charm is on-axle steering.  Unless you have a big running area, you'll probably want servos front and rear.  If your radio is programmable, you can turn the steering down on the rear (I think I run around 20-30% on my trucks) which gives the best compromise between quick turning and stability.

After that, the world is your oyster - lots of conversions to extend the wheelbase and brace the chassis with the stock links, or install custom links, or replace the entire chassis - if there's a limit, I haven't found it yet :lol:

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Just popped on to add to the above: as there are so many different directions you can take a clod, taking time to understand the basic truck could help you decide what way to go before you spend a heap of money.

If you absolutely love the way the stock truck drives, then you don't need to spend anything - just enjoy it.

If you really love the character and the scale but you want better steering, buy a servo on axle kit.

If you think it's OK but could be a bit better behaved when the terrain gets tougher or the speeds go up, look at the range of retro chassis available now.

If you find it's utterly useless and won't do what you want, bounces too much, doesn't turn, jump, accelerate or brake, then look at the full conversion options.

I mean, you could go all-in right now and buy a carbon chassis with links and servo-on-axle setup, and it might be the most fun rig you ever built, but it would be a shame to do all that without ever having driven it stock, IMO.  I've spend years trying to perfect my home-built custom racing clod chassis and all I've learned is that I'd probably have had more fun with a retro chassis.

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26 minutes ago, Mad Ax said:

Just popped on to add to the above: as there are so many different directions you can take a clod, taking time to understand the basic truck could help you decide what way to go before you spend a heap of money.

If you absolutely love the way the stock truck drives, then you don't need to spend anything - just enjoy it.

If you really love the character and the scale but you want better steering, buy a servo on axle kit.

If you think it's OK but could be a bit better behaved when the terrain gets tougher or the speeds go up, look at the range of retro chassis available now.

If you find it's utterly useless and won't do what you want, bounces too much, doesn't turn, jump, accelerate or brake, then look at the full conversion options.

I mean, you could go all-in right now and buy a carbon chassis with links and servo-on-axle setup, and it might be the most fun rig you ever built, but it would be a shame to do all that without ever having driven it stock, IMO.  I've spend years trying to perfect my home-built custom racing clod chassis and all I've learned is that I'd probably have had more fun with a retro chassis.

Sage advice right there!

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Nice one ... I remember driving my Clod in the late eighties when it was released. Pretty much stock except ball bearings (I always go for them on any of my models), CVA shocks and two Technigold motors. But that was 1988. I would second the recommendation of the one or other member to start running it fairly stock (maybe except the ball bearings) and make upgrades only from time to time (reinforced steering linkage or servo over axle is quite reasonable). The Clod is quite nice to drive and I always found it very forgiving. I don't know if the parallel/serial-switch is still in the kits today, but this was a real showstopper. Switching the motors to serial (every motor does only get the half of the voltage and when one motor gets overload it's dragging the other motor down) was somekind of weird.

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Great advice already and you have the right idea starting with stock (or near-to-stock) and modifying a bit at a time.  I'd build it stock with bearings and have some fun with it then decide what you want to get out of it.  They are truly awful by modern standards out of the box, but that's parts of the fun I guess.  Hope you have fun with it, they are still awesome trucks to look at after all these years. 

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You're going to need 2 Clodbusters.

xIf5WVP.jpeg

One to retain the stock charm and character.

And one to modify slightly.

Some say, that when you start modifying a stock Clodbuster, you get sucked down an endless rabbit hole that sees you up until 2am desperately searching the internet for answers to the laws of physics and then wondering why something this big even needs lights when it can just smash through everything.

all we know is that it's called the Clodbuster.sXfLp11.jpeg

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