Jump to content
Pylon80

Do you replace your silver can motors?

Recommended Posts

I have been running my cars quite a bit as of late and being my quirky self I like to keep tabs on how much runtime each car is getting. I think it is pretty clear now that the silver can family of motors (straight silver can, torque tuned and sport tuned) will keep running until, perhaps, one day, the brushes are 100% worn. That will either never happen or it will happen past the 100h mark if I ever get to that point (unlikely). However,  I can definitely tell that the commutator looks great for the first couple of hours and thereafter it has the usual black marks from arching and it is no longer perfectly round etc. Likewise I think the performance is great initially then decreases by a small amount and then finally the motor is on a plateau for dozens of hours on.

A long time ago when the dinosaurs roamed the earth people used to race with these motors and replace them after only a few races (I know, I know there are still some race classes using them ;)). These days this family of motor is most often enjoyed as a cheap alternative to a modern brushless setup. The 1060 ESC's can be purchased on eBay for about 25$ all day long (genuine ones at that) and the motors will cost somewhere between ~7$ and ~25$ depending on which version and where one shops at.

So, I was wondering what other folks were doing. Replace after x hours - then how much is x for you? Or just keep running them until they merely stop working? Let's hear it :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I run  silver cans it’s with a 3 cell lipo, I replace them when they let the magic smoke out, approx 20 hours is a guesstimate.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I differ between the ones I am using myself (f.ex. the TT for my  M-05) and the ones I use together with the kids. The TT and ST I am using myself getbroken in in destilled water, are only ran for 2 5 min stints, temps are checked after each run and the bushings get their drops of machineoil every other week. 

 

The kit silvercans I run together with the kids are getting ran way longer and are basically ran until they are really lacking perfomance. Together with the kids we are running 4000mAh nihm (which have their best time behind them),  so heat is not so much of a problem. I lube the bushings from time to time. The one I am putting in my Thunder Dragon when I hand it over to the kids has a really loud slukking now,  but is still somewhat going. It got it last winter when I was testing my new 5300 mAh Lipo. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Andreas W said:

The TT and ST I am using myself getbroken in in destilled water, are only ran for 2 5 min stints, temps are checked after each run and the bushings get their drops of machineoil every other week. 

How long would you keep a TT in the postal M-05 before it becomes your kid's property? :D

I like to run the cars for 30min continuously - endurance style, haha! I gear the cars accordingly and use a heatsink or a heatsink-mounted fan depending on the season, as required to keep the motor no worse than warm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I changed 3 out.

1. Ran in sea water, frozen solid.

2. Used to experiment with gear ratios, brush melted after 3 packs.

3. Used with extreme gear ratio, did not even last a pack before the brush melted.

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Pylon80 said:

How long would you keep a TT in the postal M-05 before it becomes your kid's property? :D

I like to run the cars for 30min continuously - endurance style, haha! I gear the cars accordingly and use a heatsink or a heatsink-mounted fan depending on the season, as required to keep the motor no worse than warm.

Well,  the M-05 has ran two seasons now and is still going strong without squiking, so it stays inB). The one I used to run in the Grasshornet is ready for the kids on the other hand. 

 

The TT i have temporarily in the M-08 has a fan and that is another story. It only gets warm. I have to admit that have deviated from my normal strategy and ran it for 20 min in the last round. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually run and maintain them until they're noticeably slower, or if something goes wrong with them (eat a screw, pull a motor lead).

What I like about silver cans (or brushed motors in general) is that you can usually get them in a bundle.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I mostly do restorations these days, so I see a lot of silver-can motors of unknown age and condition. There is some difference in performance between them, but I have yet to come across one that wouldn't run at all. And that includes the two that were in my old blue Clod, which were solid rust (along with every fastener on the thing). I did replace them, of course - but they still ran.

Keep in mind these are industrial motors; they're meant to be buried deep inside machines and run pumps or turn pulleys or something for years and years. And often at the full rated 12 volts. We're barely putting a strain on them.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Pylon80   I like silver cans for what they are and run them without abusing them.. I follow the 3 second rule and they run basically forever.  I have silver cans in my 30+ year old (more like 40 years old) M38 Willy's that work just fine.  

If the car does not require a certain endbell shape like the M38 does I'd just replace them when they start to wear out.. meaning it does not seem to go as fast as they originally did.  Since Tamiya includes silver cans in their cars I have a BUNCH of them in my new motor box.   They will definitely last the rest of my life.  :D  haha.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never ran cars up to the point where motor (silver can or others) needs to be replaced...

Though one motor (Super Stock RZ) seems bit rough and not enough oomph after running on 2s/3s lipo for few months. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Sogogi said:

I've never ran cars up to the point where motor (silver can or others) needs to be replaced...

Though one motor (Super Stock RZ) seems bit rough and not enough oomph after running on 2s/3s lipo for few months. 

Sounds like you need a comm lathe! I am surprised you haven't bought one yet on one of your Japanese auction websites ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pylon80 said:

Sounds like you need a comm lathe! I am surprised you haven't bought one yet on one of your Japanese auction websites ;)

Haha, I am still busy trying new chassis… maybe in the future? Lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Sogogi that was you that went brushed motor even though I mentioned about mod motors needing to be cut (comm lathe maintained)  after about 10 runs minimum..(?)  ;)

That motor can probably be saved with a fresh cut comm and new brushes.  👍

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Willy iine said:

@Sogogi that was you that went brushed motor even though I mentioned about mod motors needing to be cut (comm lathe maintained)  after about 10 runs minimum..(?)  ;)

That motor can probably be saved with a fresh cut comm and new brushes.  👍

I think so. I remember saying i prefer brushed motors.. maybe I should invest in them because i have more cars running non silver can brushed motors :)

There is something about brushed motors.. some sort of charm (like analog vs digital)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Sogogi said:

There is something about brushed motors.. some sort of charm (like analog vs digital)

Yes, I can totally relate to that. Just like wearing a mechanical watch (which doesn't need OS updates 😘) or riding a skateboard that you need to push or pump to keep rolling.

If you feed direct current to a brushed motor it starts making mechanical work with it. A brushless motor on the other hand needs a very smart ESC to pulse current just the right way over 3 wires while monitoring where the motor is at using a sensor etc. It quickly feels like black magic because the vast majority of folks don't know how the ESC does it (I only have a vague idea...).

I do have both types of motor now in my fleet and the smoothness, performance and cool running temperature of the brushless system is unbeatable. Yet I still return to the brushed ones all the time for the reasons above.

@Sogogi let's get mechanical speed controls! An no cheating, operated by analog servos! 😃

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Sogogi said:

I think so. I remember saying i prefer brushed motors.. maybe I should invest in them because i have more cars running non silver can brushed motors :)

There is something about brushed motors.. some sort of charm (like analog vs digital)

Yeah, I would definitely get a comm lathe if you intend to run mod brushed motors as your core motor.  Silver cans really don't need to be cut from my experience.. they don't require much maintenance at all.. just oil the bushings until the day they don't perform very well.

When I bench tested my JJ WC Ultima with an old 19 turn Chamelon (since that is the only Trinity motor I have that still looked new) the sound coming out of the motor was fantastic.  :wub:  I was like oh man..

I still have my Orion Chrome motors.. and custom mod motors I assembled back in the 90's.  They still work, of course.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Willy iine said:

Silver cans really don't need to be cut from my experience

Well, I'm not sure how one would go about cutting the comm inside a silver can motor since there is no access?

I did see that people used to cut the comm in sealed stock motors using a special fixture to hold the motor and going through the tiny hole where the brush go! That must have been tricky to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pylon80 said:

Well, I'm not sure how one would go about cutting the comm inside a silver can motor since there is no access?

I did see that people used to cut the comm in sealed stock motors using a special fixture to hold the motor and going through the tiny hole where the brush go! That must have been tricky to do.

I’ve opened it up. :D  But my point was silver cans are basically maintenance free.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/9/2023 at 2:38 PM, Pylon80 said:

Well, I'm not sure how one would go about cutting the comm inside a silver can motor since there is no access?

I did see that people used to cut the comm in sealed stock motors using a special fixture to hold the motor and going through the tiny hole where the brush go! That must have been tricky to do.

Pry tabs up, Do it, Bend back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...