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More updates!  Today was the first Sunday in 3 weeks that I've actually got some proper workshop time, so I made the most of it and was up and working before 10am.

The workbench was a bit of a mess, but I'd already done some significant tidying at this point and just wanted to get on with it.

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Since I can't work on the transmission until my new transfer case arrives, I decided to start looking at other important areas - such as what to do with the rear lights, and how to mount the rear shock hoops properly.

I dug out the standard light clusters from the Scania kit and experimented with a few locations.

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Also the spare tyres need to fit, so everything must work around them

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Looking at some inspiration photos, it seems many Dakar trucks have their rear lights mounted high, presumably so they don't get torn off on the dunes.  This might work?

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OK, that's a problem for later.  In the mean time, here's a problem for now: the rear shock hoops.  The stock chassis rails were just not quite long enough, so I need to extend them.

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I used some 10mm square bar to make the extension brace

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and some 15x15x1.5 L-section for the new rails.  They're totally the wrong shape but that doesn't matter as they'll be hidden.  See that I had to put a chamfer where the hoops fit because the hoops expect a rounded chassis rail from the stamping process, not the sharp edge of my extruded section.

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That'll about do it

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The longer chassis rails looked like a good spot for mounting a rear bumper, which I think it sort of needs.  This U-section looks nice and sturdy, the tricky part is Dremelling out the slots that will fit over the chassis rails.

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I wasn't happy with the holes I drilled for this bumper, and when I screwed it into place, it took on this angle because the bottom of the bumper was catching on the rails.

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I actually kinda like the angle, but I think the whole thing needs remounting.  That's not a big job but one I'll leave for another day.

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After that, I made some stands for the spare wheels.

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I realised then that I'd run out of M4 threaded rod, so I cut of a length of scrap sprung steel that I had lying around - this is only a temporary measure while I make sure everything else fits right.

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I think that's about right

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I can just about get a roof panel on

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After that, I had planned to start working on the roof.  I wanted the horizontal piece to be rigid, so I can tape the receiver and Arduino to the underside to keep them way up out of the rain and water splashes, but that meant finalising the height of the side panels.  Most Dakar rigs have the rear box the same height or slightly lower than the cab, so I figured I'd do the same.

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There.  That's better!

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After that, things got a bit tricky.  I didn't have enough 2mm or 3mm sheet to make the roof, nor did I have enough L-section to make the brackets to fit the roof.  I opted not to glue it since that might give me all kinds of hassle trying to work on it.

So, it looks like I'm back to placing parts orders this week!  I still haven't closed January's finances and my side-hustle pulled in a bit less than usual this month, plus I found out last week that I'm probably going to be made redundant in just over a month, and all my work projects have been shelved, so my little extra hustle of doing site visits to earn some extra cash is probably off the cards too - and I still have to budget for 6 rounds of the Iconic Cup.  None of these issues are super-serious, I'm starting to line up some new work opportunities already and I should get a reasonable redundancy payout, but I'm going to lose my site visit hustle which usually went towards my fuel costs for my race events.  So I guess I have to watch the pennies in February.

Also, this was an 8 hour day, with only a 15 minute break for lunch.  I've still got all the roof to make, light units to fit, transfer case and propshafts to fit, arches to box in, loads of plastic fabrication around the front end, a front bumper to protect the light clusters, battery mounts to make, and all the interior to sort out.  Oh, and the semi-functional brush guard to protect the cab and mirrors.  And probably loads more besides.

Oh, and it's all got to be painted, too!

Plus with the Iconic Cup kicking off in April and the Scaler Nationals in May, it's possible I'll have to switch priorities soon to make sure I'm ready for those events.

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Sorry to hear about the work woes but hopefully it will work out better in the long run.

The truck is coming along really well and you've done as much as you can with what you have.

It will be a shame if you have to put it on pause but it is a pretty big project and you've shown before that it is worth putting the preparation into the other events to make them worthwhile.

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OK - getting started early on the thread but probably have to leave before I'm done as the dinner is cooking...

My new transfer case arrived from China, so when Sunday dawned I was keen to get into the workshop and get it fitted.  After all the hours of work, I haven't seen this truck run under its own steam yet - would today be the day?

Here it is.  It took a while to find this on Aliexpress, most transfer cases are like a 2:1 reduction, which I wanted to avoid, as the 2-speed transmission is designed to give the right speed from the box.  Also many of them are designed for crawlers, which are wider in the chassis than 1:14 big rigs.  This, however, was perfect (apart from the bright red colour, although there are other red components on the truck, so maybe I'll incorporate red into the livery somehow).

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Missing screw is as it came in the box, although the correct screw was in the bag, it had come loose in transit.  Most of them weren't on tight.

For a moment I thought it was badly machined, as it didn't want to turn, but I think the grease had solidified a little, and after a wiggle it started moving nice and smooth.

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Another reason why I wanted a 1:14 scale case - I'm really pushed for space under here.  This just about fits.

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Annoyingly, the pre-drilled holes in the mounting bracket completely don't line up with any of the holes in the chassis :(

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This is approximately where it will go - although I'll have to do better than approximately since the centre prop has no slider

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I will probably want to build a sump guard here too.  The case and bracket are probably tougher than they look but this will be a heavy truck, and a hard impact with a stone could rip the case right off.

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With the whole chassis pulled apart (what a job that is!) I was able to properly line up the transfer case

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After which there was a problem - a terrible screeching sound when power was applied to the motor.  I had to do some stripping down but it turned out the boss that the motor mounts to wasn't perfectly machine and the motor could be twisted very slightly out of true, like it was in a sliding adjuster.  These planetary gearboxes don't have a sliding option to fit different size pinions - you get one pinion option and that's it.  If the motor is very slightly out of centre, it will bind every time a planetary gear comes into the tight spot.  After a bit of fettling and wiggling and some fresh grease, I got it reassembled and working smoothly.

I also disassembled the transfer case to drill holes in the output shafts for more robustity on the trails, and noted that there in fact wasn't any grease in it at all, so I gave it a small helping of LM grease to help the smooth.

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Fully reassembled, and with driveshafts installed.  The front shaft is a cheap slider from Aliexpress that I probably got ages ago, the rear is a Cross RC shaft that looks and feels much nicer.  I may need a matching one for the front when finances allow.

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And just like that, we have a driveable truck.  I slapped in some electrics and went out for a cruise.

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It worked pretty well, too.  The steering needs adjusting properly, which is to be expected, and the shocks are a bit soft for driving on tarmac with super-grippy tyres, but otherwise it was well behaved.  Plenty of steering lock with no binding, goes where it's pointed, seems fast enough for general crawling and trailing in 1st gear and had a nice turn of speed in 2nd, so I should be able to cruise more efficiently on the smoother sections of my walk.  I didn't give it too much power because I didn't want to turn it over or send all the electrics flying, but the transmission worked well, no binding or screeching or slipping out of gear.

So, it was back to the workbench to finish the body.  I'll let the pics speek for themselves.

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I'm still not 100% sure about the rear body lining up perfectly with the cab.  None of the Dakar trucks I've seen have that.  On the other hand, it's a pretty neat job and it would be a shame to cut it away.

I also need to think about the roof.  My plan was to have an easy-access roof for changing batteries during dark and wet walks.  I don't think a lift-up panel is going to work here due to the curve, a slide-out panel would close nicely but might be a pain in the dark.

I had considered getting a custom vinyl banner printed that would slide over a pair of rails mounted under the roof so I can just slide it open to get to the batteries and stuff.  But I'm not sure - a) I can't even test it until I've decided on a livery and had something printed, and 2) it's a lot of money to spend if it turns out rubbish.  Unless I test it with a banner that I want for another purpose first, which is fine provided the sizing is ok for whatever this other purpose is.

Still, there's loads and loads and loads of work still to do here, and a bit more money to spend, too.  So, no need to make big decisions on anything just yet.

Also we're getting dangerously close to the Iconic Cup, and I need to crack on with my special build for that, so watch out for updates in the CC01 Lowrider thread :)

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Could you make the cab roof a front hinged magnets rear for dropping batteries in? Loving the truck @Mad Ax its a winner!

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On 1/10/2024 at 7:05 AM, Mad Ax said:

The main photo I've been using for reference is this one, which maintains the stock axle position and the forward steps (interestingly, a Scania R470 with a forward axle has no steps at all)

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On this truck, the stock front bumper is entirely gone, the headlamp unit had been mounted directly under the air scoop, and a new grille panel has been fabricated, along with those odd side bumper panels.  Compare this to a stock R470, where the headlight unit is mounted low, underneath an escutcheon which probably exists to allow the cab to tilt.  (Admittedly this R470 seems a lot taller (from scoop inlet to swage line) than both my Tamiya cab and the Dakar truck above, which may be because it's a different model, or may be because of Tamiya's liberties with scale and that the Dakar truck uses custom panels or isn't even the same series at all).

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Just referring to your earlier post about the difference in the cabs mate, it’s been sitting at the back of my mind for a while and thought you may find interesting, is that the yellow Dakar truck is a Scania P Series cab, while the white one is an R Series. Generally truck companies make a lower cab for local multi delivery jobs at the sacrifice of a bigger engine tunnel in the cab as access to the back of the cab is negligible. While there taller brothers are for long distance were the driver isn’t climbing in and out so much but getting in the bunk (and being able to stand to get dressed) is more a priority so the cab floor is up higher. Some cab overs are now high enough that the cab floor is completely flat for the driver to be able to walk through, only previously possible on a conventional bonneted cousin.

Here’s a P Series..

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Excellent work by the way as always your determination in these projects are second to none 👍🏻

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36 minutes ago, Re-Bugged said:

that the yellow Dakar truck is a Scania P Series cab, while the white one is an R Series

Thanks for that, great explanation and helps a lot :)  I had noticed while out driving around a few weeks ago that lots of our quarry trucks have the lower cabs, so I was taking time to look out for the model numbers on the grille.  I don't see many of the R-series cabs now, most of them have been replaced with the later models, but there's a lot of older P-series tippers hauling stone locally.  It's amazing how long it took me to recognise that!

A P-series cab would probably look better and more authentic on this build, it's way beyond my skill to cut a section out of my cab to lower it :)

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I dont know about the 1:1 trucks but this looks amazing! Totally awesome build, just epic 

Love the idea of it hauling genuine spares too.

 

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