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I always liked miniature stuff, so RC cars might not be a stretch.  But I flew a cheap RC plane and a heli (only briefly).  I have a couple of cheap RC tanks too.  I do love tanks as static kits, as most of my static kits are tanks. Almost no static cars.  For some reason I don't seem to enjoy RC tanks, planes or helis. No trains, no boats either.  I like to tinker with a bicycle. But I hardly ride. I might like a motorcycle, but that desire is as distant as wanting a moon lander.  I don't have much interest in 1:1 cars either. To me, they are practical tools like mud boots. They get me from point A to point B in a metal box without getting me wet.  

Out of all the things, why do I like only cars/trucks when it comes to RC?  I wonder if it's because it was my first "moving toy?" 

How is it for you guys? 

 

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I do not do RC planes or helicopters or quadcopter because where I live, there is like 10 days in a year where wind speed falls low enough to fly them.

As for static, I cover virtually everything; tanks, cars, motorcycles, planes, ships, robots...

In my real life, I build 1:1 buildings...

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Really good topic and something I often dwell on.

I see myself in a few things you wrote. But I would rather fly RC planes and helicopters than drive cars; only cars are infinitely more practical. You can walk to the park take the car out of your backpack and drive. Or you can stop on the way to work and pull the car out of the trunk and drive. So easy.

I do enjoy the skill building aspect of driving RC cars well on a defined track - it's easy to do poorly but insanely hard to do well.

I also really enjoy building and tuning and modifying RC cars, far beyond what I would have ever expected growing up with RC planes and viewing (ok, looking down on) the RC car hobby as simply assembling parts.

But I will never really understand how I could possibly get so deep into RC cars when I (relatively) don't really care about 1:1 cars. One thing is obvious, they remind me of when I lived in Japan, a part of my life I really enjoyed. No wonder I'm into Tamiya's 😅

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I've loved cars since I was a kid.  Toy cars progressed to RC cars for a brief period in my early teens but then it was all about 1:1 cars from the time I could drive.  I've no interest in RC anything else, nor static modelling or anything miniature/scale.

I'm just all about the cars...

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Me too, completely obsessed with cars. More beautiful and aesthetic than most other vehicles like helicopters (ok i do like Planes and boats) and the vehicle dynamics on the limit are more obvious. Like drifting etc.  All more tangible than on a plane (where i also like it when the aoa ("angle of attack") is different than the trajectory , comparable to drifting). So why rc and not 1:1?  Reason 1 why i dont do 1:1 cars so much: money.  Otherwise id have my model cars in original size: lancia037, 911 gt2, 911 gt3 touring, impreza, lancer, r32, nsx, you name it... and you know their price tag. And im not into civics...  Reason 2: fixing 1:1 cars is a pita. I love old cars but i hate rusty screws. On my mx5 im repairing things now and then and the worst experience is e.g. trying to change the alternator, fixed by two screws, and the lower one deep down in the engine bay just wont come loose. I soo hate that. Thats what i love about my motorbike - only aluminium and plastic, no rust. I also hate things like how Hard it is to change a spring on a car. I love how easy it is on an rc car. Like lego. I love lego by the way.. i also hate e.g. the need for a vehicle Lifting Plattform. An rc car i can just take in my hand... i like that. I have control and fixing or tuning is no pita. Cheers.  

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I'm a car guy, always have been for as long as I can remember.

One of my earliest memories, is being excited that the bin lorry was coming (we stayed in a street called, hillside), as I could hear the whistle of the diesel turbo hauling up the hill.

Needless to say, I got lots of cars as a kid,  Playskool Dragster / Funny Car and Bigfoot was a favourite (trying to collect the set...cheaply ) 

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My introduction to RC cars early on, was Tandy stuff (Radio Shack in other parts of the world?), but these didn't cut the mustard for the need for speed, actually kicking the rear spoiler off a 935 Porsche, trying to make it go faster...

One of the lads in the street, got a Hornet for Christmas, ran it on the school playground, gave me a shot, and that was me, hooked for 40yrs ( to date) 🙄.

One of the reasons, i do give random strangers the controls for my car (drop the end point usually), as there's something different about watching, as actually having control of a guided missile.

I've never wanted to get ,the same as, other people,  so Santa got me the Tamiya Frog the year after, think it was wheels that gave it the association, without being the same.

Built an RC hovercraft for my CDT project exam at 15 (is it called, STEM these days?), that was quite good fun, but all the elecs where from my race car (112b esc, with water.....😳), so they where back in the race car the following day, wonder if that's still in my folks loft....🤔

I tried helicopters, but training to fly is quite hard, when if you get it wrong, you're waiting on parts, so, I've 2 helicopters, in bits....

I've had a few boats, but finding time to run them, when I'm no where near water now where I live, meant I gave them away to a friend of my wife's , kids, who live close to water. 

I've battle tanks, but nothing more serious.

Built a balsa wood kit plane, kind of, think more ended up stuck to my fingers...

 

When I paused racing RC, it was because of 1:1, and mainly this 1275GT,

 

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My first 1:1 project in my late teens/early 20's, and loved it, bored the engine to a 1293, skimmed the head in work , 286 cam etc ,  was a cracking car, even with its appetite for gearboxes (really needed a straight cut, but ££££).

 

Now the current project....😬

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So, why?

I don't know , why RC? ,whats the saying, - faster and faster, until the thrill of the speed, overcomes the fear of death, but with RC, no fear of death ? 🤔🤣

 

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I don't know why, but my mom use to tell me little kids usually go to bed with their stuffed animals, I went to bed with my Tomica's.

I was probably wired all wrong though knowing what I know today..:ph34r:

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Autism special interest in my case. My memory can literally stretch back to time in my crib and anything rotational on my Fisher Price Activity Station that was mounted on it, captivated me. Trucks grabbed my interest first. I remember clawing my way up to look over the window sill when the trash truck stopped by and being particularly interested in the rotational speed differences between the highly visible driveshaft (not that I knew what that was back then) and the truck's wheels. Every toy I had, whether Tonka, Matchbox or Hot Wheels was car based. If it didn't have wheels, I didn't care. As a teenager, I threw away my plans for a bachelors in Psychology, went to a tech college and buried myself in the world of classic car restoration while usually having as many as 10 cars of my own at home (and a fleet of Tamiyas). At 37, two years after the birth of my daughter, something broke inside me. I had literally thrown my life away in servitude of automobiles and all I had was a bad back and two blown out knees to show for it. A scary moment where two morons doing burnouts at a big car show nearly took out a crowd of a dozen people or more cemented it. Becoming a parent changes you. I still love cars (just not car "culture") but the world of Tamiya is a lot easier on the wallet and the body! lol. 

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for me, r/c cars, trucks and tanks are a diversion for the other r/c toys i prefer to build:  r/c boats and subs.   I used to do planes and helicopters as well, but when the FAA changed its attitude about flying toys, i got rid of all that.

I have been building static display models of all sorts for 50 years.

as a kid i had an N scale train layout and flew estes rockets, but gave up those when r/c became more fun for me.

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Interesting topic. Returning to RC in my 40s has been a way to satisfy a fundamental part of me. I was always mechanical/scientific, maths and sciences at school, studied engineering at university, but life and work took me other ways, mainly finance related, and then environmental (but still finance). I noted that among my colleagues in my early career in the financial world, who had all sorts of backgrounds/education, engineering degrees were by far the most common, I think because it's a way of thinking that transfers to other fields.

I maybe would have naturally been a car guy, I feel the romance of it, but a few things mean I'm not. I'm another who is troubled by "car culture". I'm turned off cars by their environmental impact. I ride bikes (albeit not as much as I'd like at the moment) but bikes aren't the same for me - I'm often tinkering with them and I'll build my own up, but really only for the sake of riding, it's not like I collect them (well, I do have about 10, so that statement's on shaky ground, but except for one special one each is either in use or not worth selling). The sheer size of a car means big money and so many hours of labour. RC satisfies my desire to tinker, engineer, change, fix etc, while at the same time, being at 1/10 scale, not really suffering from any of the above. It's like I can still get what I want out of it but put it away also, not commit serious money, not be beholden in a time sense, not really impact the world that much. Maybe people think I'm weird, but let's be honest, they probably would anyway 😉

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I love this topic. I started my RC trip with cars but being on the spectrum I will readily admit anything that moved under it's own power was fair game. Sailplanes, sailboats, scale boats, fast boats, airplanes, then finally helicopters. At one point I sincerely loved them all but lost interest. It's only the cars that I keep coming back to and I am not quite sure why. Maybe I was at an imprintable age when I got my first one? Who know but that's how it goes and I am glad to see I am not the only one. 

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I was really into planes when I was a kid in the 80's, especially from the cold war and WW2,
The B52 was probably my favorite plane.   This occurred about the same time I was interested in RC cars

I had many kitset planes back then, I also attempted to make a fibreglass scale catamaran and I had a nice balsa boat as well

I still like RC planes and boats today, I do watch them on youtube sometimes

As an adult now, the reason why I don't own a RC plane or boat is because of the sheer magnitude of all the things I'm interested in, limits have to put in place.  My main hobby is actually playing guitar and bass guitar and cycling and looking after my fruit trees which have withered because I've been spending too much time building RC cars, haha.    

If I had a big house and the cash I would definitely have some planes and boats....tanks....kites, movie replica's,  I would also love an RC pterodactyl like from the movie Wargames.   I feel fairly content with what I have though.   

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I used to be into quirky "cult cars", Volvos, air cooled VWs, Corvairs, weird but "iconic" old stuff, that I foolishly obsessed over. I'd chat with the other "car guys", argue about stupid stuff, and pretend that my smelly gutless Volvos were "better" than Toyotas.

Now I'm older, wiser, and I have adult duties to take care of, I can't waste time and money keeping some "quirky" heap of garbage on the road. And I have zero interest in bickering with "car guys" who seem to hate every other car that isn't the one that they own, no, I'll stick to classic car shows and watching races.

RCs more or less fulfill that gap, but the nice thing is that if an RC is out of order I can still go places, and they're much easier to work on and store.

That being said, I haven't seen any form of RC racing that comes close to the thrill of the real thing. Note the variety, you don't get that in RC races.

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Interesting question! 

I have to admit that I have always been into cars, but probably do not fit the car guy cliche... It started with Matchbox cars (of which I still keep a large collection hidden in the attic:lol:) and soon turned into 1:1 classic sports cars. Mind you, I love tanks, helis and planes, too. But cars were more accessible. For the last 30 years I have always had at least two cars, often more. I spent way too much money and time on classic cars, but had a good time doing so. Working on them tought me a lot of stuff. And I met great people in this hobby, some of whom became good friends to this day. Over the last decade my car passion has dwindelled down. I sold a lot of stuff and moved away from the 'scene' but still keep my 68 Triumph Spitfire, which I had bought in 1999 as a gift to myself for earning my degree in engineering.

So for me the passion for RC cars is partly a substitute for the 1:1 car hobby, but cheaper and more convenient. Also you do not have to worry about legislation when you change tires, springs or motors/engines! The degree of freedom in modifying is much larger than with real cars. I enjoy driving RC as you can do all kinds of weird stuff you wouldn't in a real car. Why RC cars and not planes, tanks, boats and helis? Like someone else mentioned, you can run them almost anywhere, which is fantastic.

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Interesting question.  I've been a petrolhead since as long as I can remember.  I used to get in trouble in my first year of school for drawing cars in everything.  It was always cars then, never planes, motorbikes, helicopters, tanks, boats, I had no interest in those.

I got interested in motorbikes when we moved to the country and I got a tiny grass track bike for Christmas, I was 8 or 9 maybe?  I raced for a while when I was 12, but being below average height and all child sports being age-based, I was competing with kids who were a lot taller and stronger than me, and if I'm being fair, I never really had the competitive spirit.  So I was always wobbling around at the back trying to control a bike that was too big for me.

My bedroom was always covered with Matchbox cars, plus a few bigger cars if I could get them.  I had all kinds of elaborate fantasies about post-apocalyptic racing series or that I owned some huge yard that was filled with all these cars.

RC-wise, I had a couple of toy grades but didn't get a hobby grade until my early teens, it was well-worn and badly beaten by its previous owner and spent most of the time in pieces waiting for parts on the boat from Japan.  I had a friend who was into RC planes, and he persuaded me to get a Precedent High-Boy (IIRC), a large balsa nitro-powered trainer plane.  My parents got it for me for Christmas after we gave up motorbike racing.  But it never got finished - I built as much as I could but needed help from my dad for some parts, and he was always too busy, so...  That was that.  I did get a Nikko Sky Ace (IIRC), an RTR 2-channel polystyrene plane, a sort of forerunner of the park flyers that would become popular later.  I think I flew it twice - first time I could barely get it off the ground, didn't have the mental time to get the trims sorted, so it went round and round in circles until the battery died.  We came back later that day after charging the battery, I managed to get it higher, but it circled farther away than I wanted, clipped a power line and broke the wing.  So, another 6 weeks waiting for parts from Japan...

I only had one more flight with that plane, when, yes, I clipped the same power line again.  We repaired it, a friend took it up to test it out, but we'd forgotten to reconnect the pushrods and it disappeared over the hills, never to be seen again.

I've got a friend now who's into planes, but as we both have young families we've never had the time to go flying together, and if I'm honest, my experiences above put me right off.  I'd genuinely still love a nice fleet of planes, but somehow I like the idea of flying a lot more than the practical aspect of standing on in a cold field with a crick in my neck and a squint on my face.

In early-adulthood I gave up all my toys in pursuit of the 1:1 car dream, but the reality never matched it.  I saw other people my age cruising around in fancy cars but I could never raise anything like the money needed for that.  I've no idea how they were funding it.  I just ended up with heaps of debt that hung over me for years.  Honestly, I had a few good experiences, but mostly I wasted the best years of my life chasing that dragon.  I'd absolutely love to have a classic American musclecar in my garage, but the reality of increasing fuel prices, lowering speed limits and encroaching ULEZ zones means it'd probably never get driven.

I also think I'd like to have stayed in motorsport - I did karting for a while, and was on the verge of going national, until some other racers put my dad off with horror stories of what it really costs to break into the big series.  I watch a lot of motorsport now (I generally have IMSA, WEC or ELMS races on in the background while I'm working from home) and I wonder what it would have been like if I'd kept at it and had the opportunity to race pro-am all over the world.

So, RC cars for me has been a way of indulging in that car culture.  It's an extension of those early days with Matchbox cars, a form of grown-up make-believe or wish fulfilment.  Some days I'm an amateur race car engineer, building a prototype racing machine in my own workshop.  Sometimes I'm a 4x4 enthusiast, heading off into the wilderness for a weekend of exploring with my friends (who are not always make-believe).  Sometimes I'm that kid who bought a used car and fitted big wheels and a loud exhaust and a bodykit.  When I go racing, I'm not the slightly overweight desk jockey who traded far-fetched dreams for financial security and family life, I'm the guy who risked it all to go race in the big league, and my name is there in the timesheet right next to former world champions.  Well, maybe not right next to.  Maybe down a bit.  Down a bit more.  A bit more.  There, there it is, at the bottom.

 

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I've always been into cars for as long as I can remember. At home, I always had Matchbox cars out on a playmat, lorries, construction vehicles and so on. I used to collect 1:24 and 1:18 model cars, have a few Bburago-sized models in storage now that were on a shelf when I was a kid. Most computer games I played were car based games like Test Drive, Lotus Turbo Challenge and Chase HQ. Now have a huge collection of Hotwheels cars amongst others, loads of games consoles, and seeing the Big Foot @Wooders28 posted pics of above brings back good memories of my own one and my brothers Black Gold one he had as a kid!

Tamiya RC cars were a no brainer for me, ever since seeing the promo videos in Beatties. I have a very mechanical mindset, I love knowing how things work, I like to tinker and modify, so a Tamiya RC car lets me do all of those things. I have mostly on-road cars and a few buggies, a couple of tanks (Heng Long ones), a few toy-grade helicopters that I've managed to get going a couple of times, but never ran a boat or anything like that. 

Now I'm a massive VW fan, work for a main dealer as a parts advisor, and currently have 2 VW's, a 2003 Lupo GTI and a 2019 Up! GTI, but I part-own another Lupo with my dad, and drive his 2023 Audi A3 quite a lot too. I am literally surrounded by VW's and Audi's and in my element! 

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I am not really a cars person. I like some of the aesthetics and the engineering. I worked in a car plant for a time. I loved my Alfa Romeo 145, but I'm deffo not a petrol head. I treated that  car (and every car) terrribly.

I like engineering (I have a degree in manufacturing / mechanical engineering), I work in Civil engineering/rail.

I like building things. I like taking things apart to see how they work and putting them back together.

I wanted a Tamiya RC as a kid, but they were too expensive. I had static Tamiya and Airfix kits, that I loved to build, but then do nothing else with them.

I have RC cars now as something to do, keep busy, take my mind off other stuff and tinker.

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I grew up with Matchbox and Corgi cars. I ogled the Tamiya in the Littlewoods catalogue but the closest I got was a Taiyo Mini Hopper.

My Grandfather was an electrical / mechanical engineer so would service my Mum's cars. The closest I really got was holding the lead lamp. My only real work on a car was helping him change the head gasket on Mum's Corolla.

My Dad was a petrolhead when he was younger but my parents divorced when I was really young and my time with Dad was very limited. He stopped having cars as a hobby but we always watched F1 (and Top Gear pre-Clarkson / Hammond / May) on the TV and we even made it to Silverstone a couple of times. 

I loved car spotting and reading about cars, Grandfather / Dad / me would regularly devour the Auto Express. I love the design, the technical innovations, the history, the sounds and the smells.

I wanted a Mini but never got one - my first car was a Fiat Uno. Whilst I love 1:1 cars, I could never justify them as a hobby - in my twenties I never had the space to store one or the tools required. Or the spare funds.

Once married and we moved to our current property, I was planning on a kit car to fulfil my hobby dream of a 'fun' car. Mrs BC wanted a classic Mini - especially after we had passenger rides round Castle Combe!

Then we had a kid and life changed (I won't go into the details but it was traumatic at first). Around that time my boss bought himself a Hornet for his 40th birthday and that sparked something in me. 

I'm glad it did, we (son and I) have had a lot of fun with our RC and even got my Dad involved. I'm looking forward to re-engaging with the hobby a little more once I have a new shed / workshop (in a couple of months, fingers crossed).

I still love cars, my Dad passes on Car magazine each month. I know they just get you from A to B, are hideously expensive and not good for the environment but they still fascinate. 

And I still have my Matchbox and Corgi cars - my son plays with them now :D

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14 hours ago, GermanTA03Guy said:

On my mx5

What about cleaning out the hood drain holes!!!!!!!!:(

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I love motorbikes. I've got 8 sat in the garage. 5 of them work as intended which being above 50% I feel that counts as a win.

My wife is less than happy with this state of affairs.

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4 hours ago, Mad Ax said:

I'd absolutely love to have a classic American musclecar in my garage, but the reality of increasing fuel prices, lowering speed limits and encroaching ULEZ zones means it'd probably never get driven.

Ever so slightly bias, but...

If you don't boot them, the MPG isn't as bad as you think, I was getting mid 20's with a worn 5ltr with a 3 speed as a daily, (The US gallon is only 3.785 litres, compared to our Gallon at 4.546, so their book figures always seem low). A mates 3rd gen camaro with the 700r4 - 4sp (what I've put in mine) gets early 30's on a round trip down to the Pod at 'motorway speeds' , so could potentially eek a bit more out taking your time (if you wanted to spend a week traveling back up the road right enough...).

At 20mph, its probably tick over in 2nd, so with a cam (Comp Cams Thumpr?) giving a rumpity rump every lamp post ,probably sound well....

Classic Cars are ULEZ compliant (over 40yrs old, so also zero road tax and no MOT requirement either, although i dont know anyone, that doesn't send them for another pair of eyes, to look over on a ramp), so you're getting into mid 80's cars, which started to come with what you'd class as, modern fuel injection, and the 4sp gearbox....

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Wooders28 said:

Ever so slightly bias, but...

To be honest, my Elgrand gives me probably as close as I can get to the classic American experience without the price tag.  3.5 V6 with a solid rear axle and a lazy column shift, not too far removed from some of the American vans that came with V6s or straight 6s, except for more power from the Japanese motor.  It just doesn't quite have the kudos.  It generally does around 20mpg combined and I've got as much as 26 on a long (and very slow) run to the Lakes.  Plus it's over 20 years old now, it's almost contemporary with some of the stuff we race at Revival!

I have considered it, when I was looking for my Elgrand I almost took a punt on a straight 6 Econoline, but I'm not sure the old Ford would have given me the same level of reliability as the Nissan has these last 8 or so years.

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It has always been cars for me too. I have yet to find a single photo of myself, except for the nice staged family photos, when I was little in which I don't have a Matchbox, Corgi, or Hot Wheels car in my hand. Usually two, one for each hand.

I started building models when I was about eight, and that was nearly all cars as well. My dad was into cars, but also airplanes, so I built a fair number of airplane models. But I was never interested in military stuff, never played with guns, didn't have a GI Joe or any of that, and way too many airplane model kits are of military planes. You actually have to look to find civilian plane models. Besides, I found a book on hot rods in the school library, dicovered the works of George Barris and Ed Roth and Gene Winfield, and lost interest in airplanes after that. Not enough chrome, and the wheels were too small. But I also was exposed to British and Italian sports cars from a young age, so I loved them too. And off-road trucks. And dune buggies; a neighbor had a VW Baja bug that I worshipped (a real rarity in Illinois, hundreds of miles from any beach). I just loved 'em all. Still do.

RC cars were a natural progression, model cars I could drive around. Real cars have been part of the equation since I was 16, starting with a 1979 VW Scirocco. I never made them a career, but looking back, I should have. Not necessarily building/fixing/driving, but writing about them. If I'd had any sense at all I would have gotten a journalism degree and gone to work for Road & Track or AutoWeek. Not sure why that didn't occur to me as a thing to do.

It's funny to hear you guys talk about American V8s; they're so common over here, even these days, that we don't even think about it. Full-size pickup trucks have been the best-selling vehicles over here for decades, and while smaller engines are becoming more common, a cast-iron overhead-valve V8 is still the rule rather than the exception. "Truck guys" are always disappointed when they hear my Chevy truck "only" as a six-cylinder in it, and ask me when I'm going to swap a V8 in. (Never; why would I? It's a tool, not a toy.) But my daily driver Chrysler has a 5.7 liter Hemi V8, and while it's on the high side for a four-door sedan, it's still the smallest and lowest-output Hemi that Chrysler makes. Frankly, I'm not sure why anyone would want or need more; I can invoke the traction control at will on dry pavement. (Haven't tried turning it off yet; I'll save that for when it needs new tires anyway.)

TL;DR - It's cars, it has always been cars, it will always be cars. Cars, cars, cars, and more cars.

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I mostly fly helicopters. My little man wanted to be able to fly, but helicopters were a but much for a then-five year-old. 

So he learned to build and drive buggies. He subsequently got a broken airplane which we fixed and he has become a decent pilot, but he still loves his buggies. 

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20 hours ago, Pylon80 said:

Really good topic and something I often dwell on.

I see myself in a few things you wrote. But I would rather fly RC planes and helicopters than drive cars; only cars are infinitely more practical. You can walk to the park take the car out of your backpack and drive. Or you can stop on the way to work and pull the car out of the trunk and drive. So easy.

One of the things I like about micro- and nano-copters is that I can fly anywhere, indoors if weather doesn't cooperate. 

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