Effigy3

TA-07 PRO Item #58636

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5 hours ago, chickenman242tk said:

500k is like working with thick glue , i run it in the centre diff in my e maxx .

I would suggest 10k in the front and 5/7k in the rear , too thick and the diffs wont work at all 

That's probably fine for a parking lot basher, hunh?  The uber high CST in the front is aimed for racers, which I don't expect to do but may.  I'm so confused now...

Butler, keeping in mind the intended purpose, do I really need to run 1M CST in the front diff or will 10K front / 5K rear like Chickenman suggests be fine?  Any other on-road guys care to weigh in?

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I use the 500k in the centre , 50k in the front and 30k rear and thats good for a basher , i havent set up an onroader in years but recently did my 8ight with 7/10/7 and thats good , i think 10 in the front would be a good start either way

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It's only diff oil, you can change it later. :)

If your running a standard motor then you'll be fine, you'll probably only want to stiffen the oil up front if you update the motor. In this area I don't see why bashing or racing is any different. Good drive is good drive. 

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I finally got the decals done.  I just need to paint the side mirrors and the remaining 3 wheels.  Then I can move onto the chassis!

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I do bodies after chassis, easier to locate post positions.

If you're masking up large areas of shell, think about liquidmask. 

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2 hours ago, WillyChang said:

I do bodies after chassis, easier to locate post positions.

If you're masking up large areas of shell, think about liquidmask. 

I used to do that too but then I found I was rushing the body because I was anxious to drive the car.  So I switched to body first and I find that I take much greater care with doing up the body.

I've tried the liquid mask before and I don't care for it.  Just a personal preference I suppose.

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I sprayed the mirrors this morning.  I did a light dusting of Fine Surface Primer (L) Item #87044 and realized I should have cut away the surrounding sprue plastic.  So I did that.  3 snips were all it took.

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After 3 light coats of the primer, 1 light coat and 1 medium coat of Tamiya TS-14 Black I have the black mirrors I need.

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Once they dry I'll insert the mirror "face" and install them onto the body.

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11 hours ago, Effigy3 said:

I've tried the liquid mask before and I don't care for it.  Just a personal preference I suppose.

yeah, it's useful but don't suit my workflow... when I get chance to paint, I gotta paint quick... don't have luxury of waiting days for rubbermasking to dry, then carefully slice without cutting the lexan (or your fenders fall off!!). And the stink is overwhelming indoors.

These days I quickmask with GladWrap (it clings ok onto lexan, but must tape edges down) and frisket or low-tack transfer tape. Not foolproof for paint bleeds but I use T's yellow tape for all edges so it's usually ok. Haven't yet tried their new white flexible tape.

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Effigy, seeing the paint flaws in the context of the whole shell they're hardly noticeable at all.  Don't sweat it; the shell looks great to me.  One or two hits to the curb and you'll never think about them ever again.  :D

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On 2/12/2017 at 9:23 AM, speedy_w_beans said:

Effigy, seeing the paint flaws in the context of the whole shell they're hardly noticeable at all.  Don't sweat it; the shell looks great to me.  One or two hits to the curb and you'll never think about them ever again.  :D

This. So much this.

Loving the color scheme.

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Life has gotten in the way with this build but it's Spring Break now and between ticking off items on my honey-do list, my fun project will be to get this TA-07 built. 

The raw ingredients:

03.04.2017-09.01.png

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Bag A

Step 1 - Rear arms

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When removing the parts from the sprue I left a bit of a nub on the part that I then made flush using my Tamiya file set.  In the past I've used the Tamiya side cutters to get as close to the part as possible which often results in a concave indentation on the part.

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The instructions state that BA4 (droop screws?) should protrude from the bottom of the suspension arm by 1mm.  This is difficult to measure so I ensured that the top of BA4 was perfectly flush with the suspension arm by running the shaft of my hex driver over top.  I adjusted the depth until I could hear no "click" as I passed the hex driver over top.

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Step 2 - Attaching rear arms

Don't miss this bit!  There's a small part of the mold that must be removed.

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I built-up the T2 bit ensuring that both bearings spun smoothly

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It installs into the center of the chassis plate.  I think it has something to do with the drive belt but at this point I'm honestly not sure.  I made certain that it was perfectly aligned with the chassis.  It took a bit of fiddling using the hex driver to turn the screw this way then that way before it was square.

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If I were building this up as a racer, I would replace parts M4, M5 and M6 (suspension blocks?) with the aluminum hop-up parts.  Since this is just going to be a parking lot basher I stayed with the stock plastic bits.

03.04.2017-11.16.png

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Step 3 - Attaching the rear bulkhead

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Nothing too difficult here but I did manage to get the A9 and A10 parts on backwards the first go.  :blink:

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Step 4 - Front arms

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Just like the rear, I left a bit of plastic from the sprue on the part then filed it down flat to avoid any concave snip marks.

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No balls on the ends of the shafts here.

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Step 5 - Attaching front arms

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I love the fact that they put a "NOTE" in to remind you that this is an on-road chassis.  Duuuuh!  Also, don't overlook another molding bit on the chassis that needs to be removed.

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Again as with the rear, if I were racing this I would us aluminum hop-up parts to replace parts M1, M8 and M9 but I'm not racing so the stock plastic bits stay.

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I do think that the 0.7mm spacers BA6 are too thick.  The front suspension arms bind just enough to prohibit smooth and free motion. There's enough friction that the arms will stay aloft on their own.

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I know I have a spacer kit somewhere.  I'm going to dig it out an replace the 0.7mm spacer with some 0.5mm jobbers.  Hopefully that will allow the arms to move freely without binding.

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7 hours ago, Effigy3 said:

If I were building this up as a racer, I would replace parts M4, M5 and M6 (suspension blocks?) with the aluminum hop-up parts.  Since this is just going to be a parking lot basher I stayed with the stock plastic bits.

I thought exactly the same when I built my TA06 PRO, first time out clipped a kerb and popped the rear arm out , wouldn't have happened with the aluminium suspension blocks. The plastic has to much flex.

sven

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Step 6 - Attaching front bulkhead

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I substituted the 0.5mm spacers from my kit and the front arms still bound up.  I had some 0.25mm spacers that I have no clue where they originated but they did the trick.  Now the arms move freely up and down but have no play forward or backward.

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That's all there is for bag A

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2 hours ago, svenb said:

I thought exactly the same when I built my TA06 PRO, first time out clipped a kerb and popped the rear arm out , wouldn't have happened with the aluminium suspension blocks. The plastic has to much flex.

sven

You are of course correct.  I have no doubt that at some point in the future I will upgrade these parts to the aluminum hop-up parts.  Curb clipping would accelerate that time table a bit...  ;)

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Bag B

Step 7 - Spur gear

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My spur gear appears to be defective.  There's an odd chemical burn/stain on the part that has discolored the plastic and given it a "fuzzy" appearance.

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I used a drop of blue thread lock to keep the screws from backing out and used a shop towel to wipe off any excess that emerged from the back side once they were snug.

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The thin spacer BB14 inserted

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The spur gear assembly is complete.

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Step 8 - Attaching spur gear

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This step had a lot to do!

Getting that A15 parts to snug up was nearly impossible and hurt my delicate fingers.  :P  So I temporarily screwed in an 8mm button head screw to provide a bit of leverage.  That worked like a charm.

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The manual states that instant cement must be used to secure the two A5 parts together.  I scuffed up the face of each part using my Tamiya file.  Then I cleaned each up using an alcohol swab.  Then I used 4 drops of Muchmore Thin CA cement.  I hate that stuff for gluing tires but I have like 1/3 of a bottle full and it works well enough for this sort of thing.

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Of course some of the CA cement oozed out and resulted in a number of little blobs like this.

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Once the cement had fully cured I filed down the hard blobs to ensure the pulley was as smooth as possible.

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But I'm not happy with the result.  I'm 99% positive that I will be ordering up the aluminum counter pulley 54706 very soon.  While I"m at it, I'll likely get the aluminum hop-up center pulley 54722 as well.  I ought to just replace that spur gear too while I have that this center spur gear assembly apart.  Look at this.  I don't even have the car built yet and I'm already planning the hop-ups!

The spur gear assembly completed in stock form:

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Step 9 - Gear differential units

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OK, so the diffs...  There are a couple pointers that I discovered that I'll share as I document my progress building up the diffs.

The diff bits.  You'll note that I only received 7 BB6 screws (between the red o-rings and the blue ball connectors) but 8 are called for.  Luckily I had one in my spares!  I also thought this build would be a good test for the sample of Udder Butter grease I was sent.

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If I were racing, especially if I were racing mod, I would replace the plastic gears with metal but as it is I'm not racing and I'm going to run a 21.5T motor so I will stick with the stock gears.

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I had planned on following Ed Clark's instructions for building a TRF419 differential posted on the petitrc site but as you can see, the 850 rubber shielded bearings I bought turned out to not be 850s.  :(

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So I used the stock brass "bearings" to which I liberally applied the udder butter.

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From everything I've read, the stock Tamiya red o-rings leak like a sieve.  Ed's guide suggested that these Xray o-rings be used instead, so I gave them a go.

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I tossed 4 into the udder butter to ensure they were well coated.

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I slid one down over the outdrive shaft

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The first tip I want to share is that you need to use these grooves in order to get the cross pin to have any hope of going into the hole in the out drive shaft.  Yes, the manual points this out but it's easy to miss especially if you've built up diffs before and just used one of the cross pin slots.  In this diff case the cross pin slots are not long enough for the pin to fit.

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Another tip is that if you elect to use the Xray o-rings be forewarned.  They like to squirm about and jump out of the groove in which they lie.  This causes the spacer to wedge up making it that much harder to get the cross pin in.  Yes, it was frustrating but I got them in, eventually.

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It's at this point at which I will typically fill the diff about 1/4 of the way with the diff oil then I'll seat the large bevel gear down on top of the pin.  Earlier in this thread it was pointed out that 20 million CST is used by some racers in the front diff and that 500K felt too thin.  The highest CST diff "oil" I could easily obtain was 1 million CST so that's what I went with.  As you can see, this diff oil is more like silicone calking when it comes out of the tube.  It just doesn't harden up like calking.  It's sticky, thick and a major pain to work with.

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Once that glob was in the diff housing, I seated the large bevel gear down onto the pin ensuring it was in properly and turned the out drive.

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Then I filled it up more and dropped the small bevel gears on their x-shaped cross pin down into the housing.  I used my large hex driver to push them down to make contact with the large bevel gear.  The thick goopy 1M CST oozed up and stayed up.  ROFL!  That's some thick diff oil.

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I liberally coated the paper seal with the udder butter to help keep a nice tight seal, not that I think this 1M CST stuff will leak.

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When flipping the top over to complete the diff build don't forget to look for the small dot (1) and align it to the larger but still small dot (2) on the bottom half of the diff housing.  This is unique to any diff I've ever built but it doesn't like to go together if those dots are out of alignment.  I did manage to get the thing together 180* out on the first diff I built, but when I realized what I had done I went ahead and repostioned the halves.

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I did up the rear diff using 7K CST diff oil.  I wrote 1M and 7K on the diff housings with a paint pen so that in the future I could remember what was in them.

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Step 10 - Attaching drive belt

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I elected to use the optional "Position 2" rather than the rearward most "Standard" position.  I like the idea of getting the mass of the motor close to the center of the chassis.  If I don't like it I can easily change motor position later.  The motor mount is held to the chassis with 2 screws.

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Step 11 - Attaching gear differential units

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I'm really digging how the serpentine belt loops around.  They fit on the diffs quite nicely and they sit in the bulkhead pretty securely even without the bulkhead covers in place.

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All set and step 11 is concluded.

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Bag B is finished up.  The red o-rings are left over as expected but I have a washer/spacer that I don't know why it's left over...

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Edit:  I went back through all of the steps for Bag B and I am 100% sure that I didn't miss any use of this BB20 washer.  I have come to the conclusion that they not only shorted me one screw but they gave me an extra washer.  Derp!

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Effigy, thanks for keeping us updated on your build.  The single serpentine belt and the movable motor mount are the coolest parts of the build (to me).

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2 hours ago, speedy_w_beans said:

Effigy, thanks for keeping us updated on your build.  The single serpentine belt and the movable motor mount are the coolest parts of the build (to me).

Yep, those two points in conjunction with the cage style chassis are all the reasons I chose this kit.  So far I'm very happy with my choice.

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Bag C

Step 12 - Steering linkage

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I used the hop-up for both the steering arm set and the steering bridge.  The bridge didn't come with accessory installation instructions.  I simply substituted the aluminum part with pre-installed bearings for T3 and it's bearings.

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It's weird to me how the ball stud doesn't screw down flush with the face of the steering bridge.  This unthreaded collar on the ball stud would be countersunk into the plastic part but that's not possible with the aluminum hop-up.

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Assembled as per the manual/hop-up instructions.

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Step 13 - Attaching steering linkage

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Step 14 - Attaching front stiffeners

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I wasn't following the manual closely enough and I went ahead and put in these two screws as well.  I didn't realize my mistake until Step 17.

03.07.2017-14.44.png
 

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Step 15 - Front axles

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I used powdered graphite to lube the u-joint because it's all metal-to-metal contact.  AW grease is great but I don't want to have the mess nor the added maintenance.

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I don't own a metric drill bit set so I had to compromise and use a 1/16th drill bit instead.  It's not perfect (obviously) but I think it did the job.

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Why do they use a countersunk screw here?  Wouldn't a low profile button head screw be better?

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Step 18 - Attaching front axles

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When I build steering arms or camber links, I'll thread the shaft all the way into the ball cup first, like this:

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Then I'll adjust them on the vehicle to the proper length.  This helps to ensure that they are equally screwed in on both ends.

03.07.2017-14.59.png

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