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If not for this thread, I would not be active on TamiyaClub at all, it seems - while I prepare my 1:10 Lancia for another run, I built up a new bike:

11kzcz4.jpg

 It is an overseas carbon frame and fork (Tideace FCS), upon which I have fixed the new Shimano Ultegra R8000 groupset and another pair of wheels I have built myself. This time around, I decided that living only once was reason enough for me to buy the expensive stuff!

The cockpit now features a real cyclocomputer:

2rnh251.jpg

2sai4q8.jpg

I had enough parts to keep my first bike in its current state - what a luxury!

4lkqrp.jpg

I built the wheels using "Progear 248 Sprint" hubs - I borrowed the design from one of my custom Tamiya decal sheets ;)

6td894.jpg

It rides a little like my old bike, but the shorter reach and that push-button-feeling shifting make quite a difference! I hope to get some decent riding in on this bike before winter sets in - at which point I can revert to my old one.

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I posted these in my Retro BMX thread, but figured they can go in here too, still have my Focus and My Cannondale, my wife has a beautiful Orbea Orca road bike and a Cannondale Scalpel (older model like my Jekyll)

46696865602_e1e204299f_k.jpg8431C07D-B1E5-4D76-8DBC-FFDB88245577 by Kym mtbkym01, on Flickr

46696866772_07d59d05bf_k.jpgE274443D-0417-45DF-BD65-BBDCB247E68E by Kym mtbkym01, on Flickr

45834228165_7c7460f9d7_k.jpg3B1B3B36-2FEF-4908-97F9-90919B074EC9 by Kym mtbkym01, on Flickr

The roadies live inside, on this awesome rack I got from ALDI

46696869192_5d34d05dd0_k.jpgCB729A83-7FB0-454D-95E8-016A87554E11 by Kym mtbkym01, on Flickr

The MTB’s quite regularly get loaded onto the RAV4, and off into the trails we go

46696868102_4c2539b188_k.jpgF77861B6-A132-4859-936D-3312FEEB125C by Kym mtbkym01, on Flickr

31808096187_72886d2992_h.jpgEF45C573-6E7D-4A12-9E24-639390F7F79A by Kym mtbkym01, on Flickr

45834230165_b6dc7676d0_k.jpg4FC24DBA-FFE5-4B55-925B-126A6B20B777 by Kym mtbkym01, on Flickr

I like what you’ve been doing Grastens with the mechanical side, it’s something I really enjoy, and have done a number of builds and rebuilds for myself and friends

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So this week in South Australia we have the Tour Down Under, the first UCI world tour event of the year, and the largest bike race in the Southern Hemisphere, riders the ilk of Richie Porte, Peter Sagan, Elia Viviani are all here.

Today was Stage 2, and my wife and I made our way to the start line to enjoy and soak up the atmosphere

These are all the Jersey wearers after stage 1, with Viviani (141) wearing the leaders ocre jersey after sprinting to the win yesterday

31820753467_7362c49083_k.jpg3EE75760-59F6-4873-BC6A-07195FBB3641 by Kym mtbkym01, on Flickr

32886938188_699a0edde3_k.jpg4416D728-6E0D-438F-9A0C-70F1DC8ABAA3 by Kym mtbkym01, on Flickr

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Jus fitted a new xt front shifter  to my 20 year old gt mtb today as i plan on using it..£15 or best offer...offered £10...countered  with  £12.50 delivered.... :D.....used ones were going for more :rolleyes:.....

20190315_133256 20190315_133507 20190316_132453 20190316_145022

20190316_132436

Got sum  quality parts on it...race face...xtr..xt..deore lx/dx..roc shox....magura hydro rim brakes.....:D...comes up sweet after  sum autosol an elbow grease :wub:

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22 minutes ago, evssv69 said:

Jus fitted a new xt front shifter  to my 20 year old gt mtb today as i plan on using it..£15 or best offer...offered £10...countered  with  £12.50 delivered.... :D.....used ones were going for more :rolleyes:.....

20190315_133256 20190315_133507 20190316_132453 20190316_145022

20190316_132436

Got sum  quality parts on it...race face...xtr..xt..deore lx/dx..roc shox....magura hydro rim brakes.....:D...comes up sweet after  sum autosol an elbow grease :wub:

I have those Judy Race forks on my old Kona 

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Judy race hydro coils.:)...tbh they could so with a refresh...but not sure how much  that will cost :unsure:

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As the cycling season continues its steady roll, I have just taken delivery of several new cassettes and chains:

34dk4lx.jpg

A wider variety of cassette configurations would be nice, but I am heavy enough to continue wanting a 32T sprocket as the smallest low gear :P The CS-HG700-11 on the right even has the big 34T low gear, which would rule out my "Schwinn" (which can only take 32T at the largest) but allow my Tideace carbon bike to use wheels so equipped.

I briefly considered making the 11-34T cassette an Ultegra one, but could not justify an extra $25 for a piddly few grams lost!

I have already installed one of the 11-32T cassettes on my "Twin Star Racing" wheels:

2cpuxyr.jpg

For anybody who has not seen these wheels on here previously: the influence should be quite obvious ;)

Since this picture was taken, the white-striped tires have departed. I also intend to order more decals for the rims - I had wanted the ones installed here to be white, but I made a mistake while designing the order :wacko: The trend is for less-conspicuous wheels on road bikes, but I have always wanted obnoxious decals on mine, and so I will be getting them soon! I guess it was because I always remembered flashy decals on high-end wheels while growing up on bikes...

All this would mean little if I had no riding to do, so I have signed up for three different cycling events so far this season. I will be riding with my partner for all of them, so each event will be between 75 - 100 km (though one will be 150 km, split into two days - 75 km/day). Once she improves, I look forward to tackling some proper granfondos!

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Thats a seriously big casette - you must be running long cage rear mechs? Are you using this with a compact crank as well?

It doesnt seem that long ago that 27 tooth was the largest you could run when the fashion was for grinding a massive gear that would leave you with a legacy of knee joint problems.

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9 hours ago, Superluminal said:

Thats a seriously big casette - you must be running long cage rear mechs? Are you using this with a compact crank as well?

It doesnt seem that long ago that 27 tooth was the largest you could run when the fashion was for grinding a massive gear that would leave you with a legacy of knee joint problems.

Yes; long-cage rear derailleurs are also equipped on my bikes.

I am not using a compact crank, though - the Schwinn has a semi-compact 52/36, while my carbon bike has a standard 53/39. If I remember correctly, I specified the largest available cassettes for my builds because compact cranks were unavailable when I was gathering parts. The green Trek from earlier did open my eyes to the benefits of compact cranks, though I am not due for new chainrings on either bike for some time. They may be considered when replacements come up.

While having the 34T gear has saved me during the very worst of my climbs, I think I would go no higher than 32T after this, and as my fitness improves, maybe I can look to go lower! I could certainly use the smaller transitions between gears on the top end. It may be a future topic for the carbon wheels, since those will be used primarily for flat stages anyway.

Technology has come a surprisingly-long way since the days when the 27T cassette was for mountain-goat climbing - I heard that cyclists were smaller and lighter back then, too :P

Incidentally, my Schwinn was originally issued with a classic 52/42 three-piece crank and a 13 - 28T freewheel. I rode it that way long enough to appreciate the setup I have now, especially while going uphill!

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True - it did feel like at the time that even the components were designed to ensure the rider was suffering in some way at every opportunity. Being able to keep seated and spin a smaller gear must be much nicer now than having to climb out of the saddle in a massive gear weaving side to side just so you can maintain enough speed to stay upright.

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Ha! Well, I cannot claim to be a proud man while climbing :P

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My bikes live in a perpetual state of hibernation. Cant remember the last time I went out but im now not very fit a have a small pang of guilt when i see them. I should sell them I suppose but they are probably not worth anything as they are all now about 20 years old or more.

I have;

2001 Cannondale Caad 4 in Saeco colours with dura ace 7700 group and old mavic carbon cosmics

2000 Principia TT2 time trial frame with dura ace 7700 group and corima carbon disc and 4 spoke front.

1997 Ribble 653 steel frame with ultegra 6500 group.

Unknown age Thorn tange steel touring frame with a random mix of components and down tube shifters

1999 i think Bianchi mercatone uno steel frame with campag chorus group and shamal hp12 wheels

2001 Giant ATX team mtb with xt group and rockshox sid xc forks

 

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I don't know much about bicycles, but my bike is still faster than yours, 'cause it has flashing blue lights! 

Seriously. Retired Police patrol bicycle, bought at auction from a small beach town in Florida. Probably not very high end, but hey, those are battery powered strobes! 

DSC_2691.JPG

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52 minutes ago, S-PCS said:

I don't know much about bicycles, but my bike is still faster than yours, 'cause it has flashing blue lights! 

Seriously. Retired Police patrol bicycle, bought at auction from a small beach town in Florida.

Are you sure it just doesn't seem that way because everybody pulls over and stops when you get the lights going? :P

Ex-police bikes in good condition are often quite comfortable, I heard - a relative of mine was a bike cop for several years. I guess they have to be, if an officer will be spending lots of time on one...

Nice find!

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8 hours ago, Grastens said:

Are you sure it just doesn't seem that way because everybody pulls over and stops when you get the lights going? :P

But... but... isn't that the definition of "faster"? Relativity like? No need to go all Albert Einstein on me :lol::lol:

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Aha - why have I only just found this thread?!

It's great to see so many older bikes, and subsequently being upgraded with a few new parts - much like our 80's and 90's Tamiyas too I guess?

So, here's mine:

i-mqgLb5v-XL.jpg

It's a 2001 model Mountain Cycle San Andreas DHS - I built it up using all brand-new parts at the time, after originally just buying this set of disc wheels for my GT LTS (yes, I still have that too) - only to find the options for a rear disc mount/conversion were limited at the time - so I thought OK, I'll buy a new frame to go with them (and had always fancied a San Andreas anyway)  and then realised I'd also need a new fork (with a longer steerer, and ideally more travel too to match the 6" rear of the DHS), and it really went from there really... much the same with buying a few parts for an existing RC car and ending up with a whole new model too I guess!

If anyone is interested in the spec, it's as follows:

2001 Mountain Cycle San Andreas DHS (6" travel version) with Fox Vanilla coil shock.

Rockshox Psylo fork (5" travel - coil spring)

Middleburn RS7 cranks/spider/triple chainring - 24/34/44

full Shimano XT transmission (BB/shifters/derailleurs/chain/11-32 cassette)

WTB speed-disc rims on Hope hubs

Hope Mini hydraulic discs f&r (160mm rotors)

DMR V8 pedals

X-Lite PSS1 Ti/kevlar saddle

Easton EA50 seat-post (I have two, a regular 400mm and a shorty cut-down version to get the seat really low)

Kore B52 stem (40mm)

Azonic (O'Neal) 2" riser bars

Cane Creek headset

Lizard Skins grips and X-Lite bar-end plugs

Up until recently it was still sporting some 17 year old WTB Velociraptor tyres, but I've now replaced those with some Continental Vapor 2.1s (the widest I could go on the narrow 17mm rims you see).

So as you can see, what started out as a modest price wheel upgrade to my existing bike, ended up being a blow-the-budget build using what was essentially a role-call of the leading MTB component manufacturers of the time - and as such, I'm loathe to change anything about it really as it is effectively my time-capsule mountain-bike of the period*.

*for info. Currently my other bike - a 1997 model GT LTS 3 - is still in transit from the UK, and I'm not so precious about keeping that original as it's already had a number of changes and upgrades over the years (including Judy XL forks and the main frame triangle being powder-coated black) - in fact I've just ordered a 1x10 transmission (including some tasty RaceFace cranks) to replace the old LX/SLX 24 speed triple set-up, so I'll add that one to this thread too once it's built up!

Right, you've inspired me to go out for pedal this afternoon!

Jenny x

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On 4/17/2019 at 7:53 PM, JennyMo said:

Aha - why have I only just found this thread?!

It's great to see so many older bikes, and subsequently being upgraded with a few new parts - much like our 80's and 90's Tamiyas too I guess?

So, here's mine:

i-mqgLb5v-XL.jpg

It's a 2001 model Mountain Cycle San Andreas DHS - I built it up using all brand-new parts at the time, after originally just buying this set of disc wheels for my GT LTS (yes, I still have that too) - only to find the options for a rear disc mount/conversion were limited at the time - so I thought OK, I'll buy a new frame to go with them (and had always fancied a San Andreas anyway)  and then realised I'd also need a new fork (with a longer steerer, and ideally more travel too to match the 6" rear of the DHS), and it really went from there really... much the same with buying a few parts for an existing RC car and ending up with a whole new model too I guess!

If anyone is interested in the spec, it's as follows:

2001 Mountain Cycle San Andreas DHS (6" travel version) with Fox Vanilla coil shock.

Rockshox Psylo fork (5" travel - coil spring)

Middleburn RS7 cranks/spider/triple chainring - 24/34/44

full Shimano XT transmission (BB/shifters/derailleurs/chain/11-32 cassette)

WTB speed-disc rims on Hope hubs

Hope Mini hydraulic discs f&r (160mm rotors)

DMR V8 pedals

X-Lite PSS1 Ti/kevlar saddle

Easton EA50 seat-post (I have two, a regular 400mm and a shorty cut-down version to get the seat really low)

Kore B52 stem (40mm)

Azonic (O'Neal) 2" riser bars

Cane Creek headset

Lizard Skins grips and X-Lite bar-end plugs

Up until recently it was still sporting some 17 year old WTB Velociraptor tyres, but I've now replaced those with some Continental Vapor 2.1s (the widest I could go on the narrow 17mm rims you see).

So as you can see, what started out as a modest price wheel upgrade to my existing bike, ended up being a blow-the-budget build using what was essentially a role-call of the leading MTB component manufacturers of the time - and as such, I'm loathe to change anything about it really as it is effectively my time-capsule mountain-bike of the period*.

*for info. Currently my other bike - a 1997 model GT LTS 3 - is still in transit from the UK, and I'm not so precious about keeping that original as it's already had a number of changes and upgrades over the years (including Judy XL forks and the main frame triangle being powder-coated black) - in fact I've just ordered a 1x10 transmission (including some tasty RaceFace cranks) to replace the old LX/SLX 24 speed triple set-up, so I'll add that one to this thread too once it's built up!

Right, you've inspired me to go out for pedal this afternoon!

Jenny x

Rare sight in the UK, my Haro Monocoque frame was built by Mountain cycle.3c5monel.jpg

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3 hours ago, Futura said:

Rare sight in the UK, my Haro Monocoque frame was built by Mountain cycle.3c5monel.jpg

Nice! - similar to the MC Moho by the look of it?

[Bob] Haro really is a name from the past - a total BMX bandit! - in fact I bought a Skyway because of his influence!

Jx

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On 18 April 2019 at 4:53 AM, JennyMo said:

It's great to see so many older bikes, and subsequently being upgraded with a few new parts - much like our 80's and 90's Tamiyas too I guess?

I like even older stuff :unsure: like these

72B62BA2-4A1D-49C2-8A69-E5480F40049A.jpg

and do stupid restomods :o

F20AC376-2375-4A1F-BE6B-7B54CD450771.jpg

Sheldon Brown would approve ^_^

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14 hours ago, JennyMo said:

Nice! - similar to the MC Moho by the look of it?

[Bob] Haro really is a name from the past - a total BMX bandit! - in fact I bought a Skyway because of his influence!

Jx

Bob is a legend, he liked a post of mine on Instagram, the wife didn't understand why I was running around like a lunatic!

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MCI Racing has actually played a few parts in the ongoing saga of my bicycle. After the first rebuild, a few kit decals ended up on the aftermarket components I used. I even commissioned them to print original decals for a set of blank carbon-alloy wheels I had.

Today, said wheels received an update in some proper white-fill wheel stickers:

r7njn6.jpg

And with that, I think my bike ended up looking even tackier (in a good way?):

10z0dbd.jpg

But flashy stickers had captured my imagination when it came to high-end wheels, and so I took the opportunity to get some printed out, to dress up what were otherwise rather ordinary rims.

The design is certainly busier than most proper wheel rim schemes, even like that on the Fulcrum Racing Quattro that inspired me:

Fulcrum%20Racing%20Quattro%20wheelset.jp

The end result has me thinking more like some of the no-name offerings from overseas:

2018-costelo-cento-Complete-Bike-DIY-Mad

But once up to speed, they look the part! Nonetheless, a lesson learned in graphic design...

I have resumed shift work at my local bike shop, as they are quite busy this season. I am now training to be a dedicated mechanic, so I get to spend a lot of time around some neat bikes these days :) The subsequently-healthy pay has allowed me to invest in good cycling clothes, which I hope will make a positive difference, especially in the cold and the rain.

It is looking like a nice summer for cycling, as I have already booked a half-dozen events from June to September! The Schwinn is my training bike; I have the carbon-frame ride for the actual events. The carbon-alloy wheels on the Schwinn are actually there on shakedown - once properly stressed and adjusted, I intend to put them on the event bike for the flat-road rides.

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The bike has been something of a rolling laboratory. That role continued with my introduction to tubeless tires:

2da10lt.jpg

A Schwalbe Pro One kit and accessories introduced me to the concept, but the first tires that actually got rolling were a set of Hutchinson Fusion 5s. The carbon-alloy wheels from previously have some rather-pronounced shoulders on the rims, so I went tubeless on these:

wbwa3c.jpg

Despite never being advertised as tubeless-ready, I found that the shoulder profile and rim bed shape were both friendly to the technology. With the airtight rim tape, special valves, and a good dose of sealant, the tires held air with no weak spots.

The shakedown was on what was incidentally my first-ever group ride. Riding with the other mechanics from the bike shop where I work, I found it a bit ironic that the least-established of us (me) should be the one with the loudest bike:

mvt5e8.jpg

The leader was more skilled than the rest of us, so in our attempts to follow him as he jumped his bike over curbs, I bent the rear wheel. The brakes did not rub until later, and fortunately it came out with a bit of truing.

Otherwise, it was a grand day out, and the rest of the bike survived:

w7edfq.jpg

Having no tubes in the tires did actually make a small difference in speed and comfort: I was the only one riding aero-section wheels, but had less trouble spinning them up to speed to catch my groupmates in sprints. The curb mishap could have also easily led to a pinch flat, but nothing of the sort happened. There is still nothing wrong with inner tubes, but I am glad to have tried tubeless.

And if nothing else, I am now our shop's go-to resource on installing them! I look forward to the next opportunity in 5 years when someone comes in to ask about installation help :P

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Thought of you're wheel building skills when I snapped a spoke on way to work recently Mr @Grastens. First time its ever happened to me. 

0pjRpMCl.jpg

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Pimped my ride with a Sony bluetooth speaker that turned out to be a perfect fit into a bottle holder. Just a couple of zip ties to stop it falling out. Something to to help set the tempo on hill climbs is always welcome :)

9a8JNVll.jpg

3sMkzHsl.jpg

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