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gt4baby

Tamiya celica 58096 questions

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Hello. Been years since i had a tamiya ta02 castrol celica, and today i started building my new in box tamiya ta01 celica 58096. I have a few questions.

1) is there a difference if you put the large plastic bearings 1150 in any of their sides?

2) plastic bearings 1150 that i installed in the uprights seem to fall easily, and not tight as in other cars like the hornet. Is that normal?

3) everything followed from the manual, when i turn the wheels by hand they stop when i let them go, they dont continue spinning like in my hornet. Is that the 4wd difference here?

thats all. Thanks :)

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Okay i have read this one: 

 

so i guess this answers me the question number 3 and everything seems to be as they should :)

now if anyone could tell me why the balle bearings can go into the uprights easily and can be taken off as easily as moving the rc to an angle, and not being stuck tight as in other cars like the hornet?

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5 hours ago, gt4baby said:

Hello. Been years since i had a tamiya ta02 castrol celica, and today i started building my new in box tamiya ta01 celica 58096. I have a few questions.

1) is there a difference if you put the large plastic bearings 1150 in any of their sides?

2) plastic bearings 1150 that i installed in the uprights seem to fall easily, and not tight as in other cars like the hornet. Is that normal?

3) everything followed from the manual, when i turn the wheels by hand they stop when i let them go, they dont continue spinning like in my hornet. Is that the 4wd difference here?

thats all. Thanks :)

To answer your questions...

1. -  Yes, IMHO replacing the stock plastic or bronze bushings in any Tamiya is a good upgrade.. It reduces friction, which allows the drive train to turn easier, and makes it easier on the motor which can give a slight increase in speed an runtime... The friction created by the bushing also leads to increased wear on those parts (axles, shafts) so bearing can also increase the service life of those parts as well...

2. - I have noticed that some of the bearings are not a press fit into the plastic parts on some of my cars as well, but it doesn't really seem to cause any issues.. I don't know why the bearings don't fit as tight as the bushings, maybe its because the plastic parts were moulded slightly oversize, maybe the bearings are slightly undersize... If it bothers you, then try shimming the bearings with some thin tape (masking tape, or the clear tape used for wrapping presents) so they fit tight in the knuckles/hubs... If the bearings don't fit tight on the axles or shafts, then maybe the shafts have been worn by the plastic bushings? (I am assuming that we are only talking about fractions of a millimetre difference here, and that you have the correct size bearings?)

3.- A few things come into play here... Basically the diffs are different designs.. Your TA01/02 will either have ball diffs or semi sealed gear diffs with metal internal gears with fine teeth driving into either dog bone or universal drive shafts to the wheel axles.... Ball diffs are spring loaded internally, and the springs (and ball diff grease) cause friction between the diff balls and the diff rings so that you get drive through the diff, but the friction also opposes the differential action to some extent.. (With some ball diffs you can alter the spring tension or how tight the diff is so you can tune the differential...)  The semi sealed gear diffs are often shimmed so the internal gears have a tighter mesh, and they are also often packed with grease, and the grease causes some friction which can oppose the differential action.... (It is common with the front wheel drive chassis cars for them to spin whatever wheel has the least amount of load, so many people will shim or fill the geared diff with a thick grease like Tamiya AW grease to increase the friction inside the diff, and reduce the differential action quite a bit so that you can get more drive to each wheel.. You can also get sealed geared diffs for/with some cars that allows you to fill the differential with different grades (thickness / viscosity) oil to alter or tune how much differential action you have through the diff..)

The Hornet has a large plastic diff with very coarse teeth on the gears and it drives out through straight axles supported by 4 bushings / bearings...... The Hornet also has wheels/tyres that are quite a bit heavier than standard touring car wheels, and the heavier wheels can act a bit like a flywheel and keep the inertia going after you let the wheel go..

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@Backlash thank you very much for the extensive response. You have been very helpful and covered all the issues. :) i believe that everything is okay with the build now after i have read your response carefully :) Thank you again for everything :)

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