Juggular

Midlife Crisis and RC?

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It seems a lot of people are re-starting RC in their early 40's.  Are Tamiya's re-releases directly aimed at midlife crisis??  I wonder if Tamiya would run out of that crowd...   

This came up while messaging with @Re-Bugged...  My brother-in-law was going through his midlife crisis, and I brought up RC.  He likes the water, so he was leaning toward kayak.  On a whim, though, he bought a used DB01 roller for some 50 dollars.  He's not a car guy, and he doesn't like fixing things. The DB01 was not in good shape and he doesn't even own a radio set.  He brought it to me, with an expression of "what the heck am I doing with this?"  Since his whim might have been my influence, I might have to *happily* buy it off of him.  I could point to beginner-friend RTR deals, or I might have to buy a kayak so I could spend a day with him occasionally.  I felt real bad, seeing him struggle to find a suitable hobby.  

On the other hand, I feel very lucky that I grew up with RC.  I never had to wonder what kind of a hobby is for me.  Tinkering with RC makes my day.  How about you guys?  Do you feel lucky? 

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What's the difference between a midlife crisis and having more money than you did when you were a kid? I'm 41 and was only out of RC from 19-30, 19-30 spent my money in bars and random girls (what a waste of money but it was fun at the time I guess LOL). I still love stuff from the 80's and 90's that I did not have. One of my other hobbies is Sea Doo Jet skis from the 90's that I could not afford then, I got 4 of them right now. Sure I make enough money I could go out and buy new ones but they are not what I want. I want the old ones I couldn't afford back then, plus I like working on them and restoring them just like how I like working on RC.

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I do feel lucky.

I got to my forties, was lucky to have my son arrive, the lack of time and the need to quiet evenings meant that I'm not listening to music so much and the ringing in my ears also makes me less inclined to go to gigs.

I had planned on a kit car (decided against a classic Mini - my wife didn't like the idea of me learning to weld!) but the arrival of el kid put paid to that idea too.

I'd not had what you might call a 'proper' hobby, I 'd wanted a Tamiya as a kid but never managed it. I'd had a few static models and loads of Matchbox and Lego. Then some Warhammer painting in my early teens.

So Tamiya is all of those things wrapped up in one - tinkering, assembling, painting...and cars.

As for a mid-life crisis, my introduction to the hobby came during a time of great stress and has been a 'safety valve'. Perhaps staving off that crisis?!

Reissues? I don't have the attachment that others do on here. I do get excited about the new models though!

I hope your brother-in-law finds the right hobby. A friend of mine is on the cusp of giving up on a hobby project he started a year ago and has invested a lot of time and money. It is very sad to think that he'll be back at a loose end. 

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32 minutes ago, emspjay said:

What's the difference between a midlife crisis and having more money than you did when you were a kid?

Its this, and Tamiya know that too. All the cars we wanted then but couldnt afford at the time we can buy now. I would imagine its the rereleases that are practically keeping them going. And the same with the upcoming releases too like the Audi Quattro rally car, its hardly a car relevant to anyone of a younger generation but to us (im 40 this year) its a car I grew up watching on tv and admiring and will definitely buy when its out.

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39 minutes ago, Superluminal said:

Its this, and Tamiya know that too. All the cars we wanted then but couldnt afford at the time we can buy now. I would imagine its the rereleases that are practically keeping them going. And the same with the upcoming releases too like the Audi Quattro rally car, its hardly a car relevant to anyone of a younger generation but to us (im 40 this year) its a car I grew up watching on tv and admiring and will definitely buy when its out.

I agree with that! Tamiya for sure knows! I have purchased many re-re's from back in the day but I'm also purchasing some of their new products just because I like what they are putting out and being back in the hobby.

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I actually feel bad for people that don't have hobbies.  I don't even care what the hobby is, but I feel like everyone needs something.  I'm into RC, 1:1 cars, play a lot of hockey, and pretty much anything mechanical or with an engine.  I always have something to do and am never bored.  Sometimes it's a bit overwhelming with all of the different projects I have going on, but I wouldn't have it any other way.  I also never try to force people into the hobbies I like.  I definitely make suggestions, but I understand that everyone sees the world differently and thinks about things in different ways.   

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2 hours ago, Juggular said:

It seems a lot of people are re-starting RC in their early 40's.  Are Tamiya's re-releases directly aimed at midlife crisis??  I wonder if Tamiya would run out of that crowd... 

I was only "out" for 5 years before diving right back in. It was the early 2000's than and I was in my 20's (where did the time go?). I was wild for the re-releases back then well before midlife crisis time. I feel Tamiya re-releases are perhaps aimed at those that grew up with them or had them back in the day (kid or adult). Maybe you were a kid who dreamed of a Hot Shot but never got the chance to own one. Maybe you were an adult who raced a Frog back then and it got lost in the sands of time, but now you can re-live those memories. All this aside, I will admit, for those not into the re-releases when they first rolled out years back, they may be now because of a mid-life crisis. I seem to be seeing an influx of this age group re-discovering Tamiya. The re-releases almost seem tailor-made for a mid-life crisis.

Do I feel lucky? YES! Where else can you get a second chance at buying beloved childhood items you missed out on the first go around? My interest in newer Tamiya has dropped as I've aged. I'm just so at-ease and at home with the old designs.

54 minutes ago, 87lc2 said:

I actually feel bad for people that don't have hobbies. 

I'll second that. Most folks don't get to do what they love for a career. I've seen many folks bury themselves in work trying to "get ahead" only to come home as an empty shell who vegetates in front of a TV or smartphone. Hobbies are critical. In a way, they define us. I may be buried in my hobbies but I'm never lost as a person, because I have my hobbies. 

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I’ve definitely got back into my RC as part of a ‘midlife crisis’ so I’m buying all the cars always wanted but could never afford as a kid, & for once the other half understands... It’s either drop a fairly reasonable sum on a lot of models/projects that can be sold if needs be, or go fully overboard and buy that sports car that won’t fit any of the family & i’d Probably lose my license in! Thankfully my family keep buying me track days so I’m not really missing out on the sports car either! 😁

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35 minutes ago, max69vk said:

I’ve definitely got back into my RC as part of a ‘midlife crisis’ so I’m buying all the cars always wanted but could never afford as a kid, & for once the other half understands... It’s either drop a fairly reasonable sum on a lot of models/projects that can be sold if needs be, or go fully overboard and buy that sports car that won’t fit any of the family & i’d Probably lose my license in! Thankfully my family keep buying me track days so I’m not really missing out on the sports car either! 😁

I appreciated all you guys with wives and kids still in the hobby! For me it's just the wife and I, we are not having kids so we have "disposable income". Almost all our friends have kids so we know how hard you guys work to provide for your family's. And you are right RC is SO much cheaper that a 1:1 sports car. I'm still looking at picking up a 1:1 sports car but I don't want to loose my space in the garage to one. Some much nicer to just open the garage and leave for work in the morning without scraping snow and ice off my car in the winter, don't have to do that with a RC car!

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It was the rereleases that got me back in, sort of.  And maybe a bit of mid-life crisis.  Before I knew about rereleases I had got my old Kyosho out of the garage and used it in the driveway with my son who was about 2 at the time - apparently not age appropriate...

Then my colleague got a Monster Beetle delivered to the office and I was so jealous.  That was one of the car I most wanted back in the day, among others of course.  Not long after I packed in that job with a plan to have 3 months off, and immediately ordered 2 TT02B's, and the rest is history.

I think Tamiya are precisely targeting our age group, along with a whole lot of things (think those 90s toys that were just starting to get a bit smart, tamgochis or something?  Same thing, targeting people with spare cash and young kids).  We're lucky, people who grew up in the 60s have to buy a Corvette or Mustang to live out their dreams which cost a fortune whereas I can have a new kit every month if I really want it (well, probably not an Egress or truck) and live it over and over.  Its a really cheap and harmless way to enjoy yourself.

I agree with the sentiment that its sad people don't have hobbies.  Most of my friends are either flat out on the treadmill keeping everything going (mortgage, nanny, car payments etc) and they are always exhausted - when you see them and ask "how are you?" they just say "busy" and then moan a lot.  They say they don't have time for a hobby.  Then the other group don't want a hobby, they want to do nothing or be entertained, ie they can't keep themselves occupied with a project, they have to go out for a meal or scroll through their smartphone.  They think I'm mad taking on a project that will take approx 100 hours to finish but then I'll have a cool boat (at least I'll think its cool).

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definitely returned to the hobby thanks to rere’s. Midlife crisis? Maybe. I suppose that would explain the new sports car, affair and toupée 😂

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4 hours ago, emspjay said:

What's the difference between a midlife crisis and having more money than you did when you were a kid? I'm 41 and was only out of RC from 19-30, 19-30 spent my money in bars and random girls (what a waste of money but it was fun at the time I guess LOL). 

This could be me, just I was between 15 & 31. Then I bought a Monster Beetle from a colleague and have been tinkering ever since. Aside from disposable income age has also brought better engineering skills and patience.

Tamiya's appeal for me is part nostalgia and closure, i.e obtaining and doing justice to models I couldn't as a youth, by it's nature this has got to be a dwindling market.

However justifying the cost for models that need basic upgrades (bearings & CVA shocks) is getting harder. Saying that I still need closure on a few models ;)

 

 

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1 hour ago, Jonathon Gillham said:

It was the rereleases that got me back in, sort of.  And maybe a bit of mid-life crisis.  Before I knew about rereleases I had got my old Kyosho out of the garage and used it in the driveway with my son who was about 2 at the time - apparently not age appropriate...

Then my colleague got a Monster Beetle delivered to the office and I was so jealous.  That was one of the car I most wanted back in the day, among others of course.  Not long after I packed in that job with a plan to have 3 months off, and immediately ordered 2 TT02B's, and the rest is history.

I think Tamiya are precisely targeting our age group, along with a whole lot of things (think those 90s toys that were just starting to get a bit smart, tamgochis or something?  Same thing, targeting people with spare cash and young kids).  We're lucky, people who grew up in the 60s have to buy a Corvette or Mustang to live out their dreams which cost a fortune whereas I can have a new kit every month if I really want it (well, probably not an Egress or truck) and live it over and over.  Its a really cheap and harmless way to enjoy yourself.

I agree with the sentiment that its sad people don't have hobbies.  Most of my friends are either flat out on the treadmill keeping everything going (mortgage, nanny, car payments etc) and they are always exhausted - when you see them and ask "how are you?" they just say "busy" and then moan a lot.  They say they don't have time for a hobby.  Then the other group don't want a hobby, they want to do nothing or be entertained, ie they can't keep themselves occupied with a project, they have to go out for a meal or scroll through their smartphone.  They think I'm mad taking on a project that will take approx 100 hours to finish but then I'll have a cool boat (at least I'll think its cool).

Boats are cool and worth the time and money if you have it. I got RC's and 1:1 but it helps to live on the water. We live in a canal subdivision, looks like a normal house up front but in the back yard is a canal going out to the lake.

 

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20 minutes ago, emspjay said:

Boats are cool and worth the time and money if you have it. I got RC's and 1:1 but it helps to live on the water. We live in a canal subdivision, looks like a normal house up front but in the back yard is a canal going out to the lake.

 

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Nice collection!  And nice backyard.  There are a few of those subdivisions in New Zealand but none near me.  I think they are a great idea though for the keen boatie - I stayed at a friends house on one once and it was so easy being able to jump walk to the boat, get in, fuel up nearby and you're away.  Much easier than the rigmarole of launching at a boat ramp along with half the population etc

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i look at it this way, i hope my grandsons will learn to work on all these projects i've done or hopefully they will have fun destroying them.

it's why i purchased the 2011 Avante,

i remember that at a LHS and was lucky to purchase The Frog at the time.

had a Kyosho 28" deep v and use to use my Makita cordless batts to run the thing, brushed Trinty Monster Motor (still have that) not the boat.

i have no more room. but i can't stop building it's in my fiber. besides i like the tools i acquire, they are just as much fun to collect as the vehicles.

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50 minutes ago, Jonathon Gillham said:

Nice collection!  And nice backyard.  There are a few of those subdivisions in New Zealand but none near me.  I think they are a great idea though for the keen boatie - I stayed at a friends house on one once and it was so easy being able to jump walk to the boat, get in, fuel up nearby and you're away.  Much easier than the rigmarole of launching at a boat ramp along with half the population etc

that's why i got rid of my boat (LOVE THE WATER) but trailering is the sheets politely speaking, Ca. has some nice lakes, but way too many village idiots on the water ways nowadays, they need to make people take a course (i'm not into big brother) but some people shouldn't even be allowed to put their toe in the drink:lol:

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I had an early life crisis that has lasted over 20 years. Was never allowed to have a Hornet or Frog as a lad and always ended with crappy dept. store RC cars. Once I got a job and had a couple of pay rises, I wandered into the LHS and bought a Super Hornet. 20 something cars later and here I am.

Now I have both my kids into RC. They are good at driving, not so good at fixing or having consideration for mechanical sympathy.

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5 hours ago, J@mes said:

definitely returned to the hobby thanks to rere’s. Midlife crisis? Maybe. I suppose that would explain the new sports car, affair and toupée 😂

I take it then the Sports car is a Hardtop as opposed to a Cabriolet then? ;)

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I like to think of it more as a 'Mid-Life Awakening' than a crisis. You get to a point where you've done your bit (although it never really ends) as a Husband, Father, etc, Everyones entitled to a some 'Me Time'. I think you'd go mad if you didn't.

I've always enjoyed Tamiya from my first experience as a young lad building a static Suzuki RM 250 Motorcross bike. That was just the bee's knees to me. I've nearly always had a 1:1 Motorcycle in my life and I enjoy riding, maintaining and cleaning. Along side Cycling too. I find the cleaning part very therapeutic, its as if it cleans the mind and soul as well. But age and old injuries are starting to hinder bikes a bit now.

I've had an RC car of some description in my life to for the most part. Now its coming through as more of a go to pastime as it can be done at home for the most part. But its only this last 12/18 months that I've had more then one :D. And that feels nice. So go ahead Tamiya and take my money.

As time passes I suppose it leaves less of it to do the things you always wanted to. And as been already mentioned RC'ing is a relatively cheap hobby and easily accessible to most, and after all this time it still puts a smile on the dial so I for one will be sticking with it for now.

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I'm proud of my mid life crisis!  The feeling I got when I first got back into the hobby after 30 some odd years being out of it was a great thrill and really brought me back to my youth, like a time machine!  I've often thought that if the 12 year old me could look into the future and see myself now he would be a happy camper!  

I would be shocked if Tamiya didn't know the 40 something crowd hooked on nostalgia was a big part of their market!  Good for all involved I say! 

I know a few people that have no hobbies.  My brother in law is a year younger than me, has high blood pressure, works non stop, travels for work a few times a month, and pretty much has no hobbies or no free time to enjoy them if he did.  He makes a lot of money, but to me it's not worth it.  I enjoy my hobbies and treat them as therapy, and couldn't imagine not having any. 

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Returning to RC wasn't so much a mid-life crisis for me, it was too early.  I'd had a few Tamiyas when I was younger but they were mostly well-abused before I got them and they spent more time waiting for parts on the slow boat from Japan than they did driving around.  None were hopped up (not even bearings), all had ancient Tamiya NiCads that would give about 3 minutes runtime after 20 minutes on the clockwork ticky-time charger, if I was lucky.

In my late teens my main hobbies became writing fiction and music.  Fiction writing is about as cheap a hobby as you can get (especially with the wealth of info on the internet, you don't even need access to a library or a stack of source books).  Music can be very expensive but the 90s was the era of the opensource digital tracker, and after wasting a lot of money on expensive hardware I went down the tracker route (which eventually evolved into the DAW package) and I've never looked back.

At age 20 I got into 1:1 cars and motorbikes, and it was a disaster.  I never had the money I needed to finish what I started.  I knew that when I started, but I did it anyway.  I got in heaps of debt and had nothing to show for it.

Also I never settled down and had kids at that age.  I'd say I never found the right lady; the reason was probably because I spent all my money on useless old cars and motorbikes and that didn't really make me good boyfriend material :D

Thanks to my vehicle-related debt, I couldn't afford to move out from my parents until my mid-20s.  I got rid of a lot of stuff then.  I still had some motorbikes but eventually I sold those too.  I replaced them with RC.

Yes, it was the re-res that hooked me in but actually I bought a DF-03 first.  I'm glad I did.  I was going to buy a Midnight Pumpkin, and if I had, I'd probably have sold it and never had another RC.  As it was the DF-03 was just what I needed.  I met some friends through Tamiyaclub and we had some great bashes in local parks.  I was always jealous of the stuff other people had but it encouraged me to save more, get more, and build better.  I still dabbled a little with cars and bikes but as I got older I realised I was just wasting time and money.

I bought a house with my now-wife over 5 years ago and our lives changed totally.  We had two incomes and a much smaller mortgage.  I was in my mid-30s and had way more disposable income than I realised.  I paid off my debts, kitted out my recording studio, upgraded my laptop and software, bought dozens of RCs, bought the motorcycle I'd always dreamed of and built myself a small camper.  RC remained a constant "something else to do" hobby that partly stops me from going mad in the studio and partly stops me from ever achieving greatness as a writer or musician.

Then two years ago (yesterday, actually) my daughter was born.  I was 37.  I was at the age when a lot of my friends were having mid-life crises.  Their kids had grown up and only wanted their parents for taxi duties and piggy banks.  While they were rediscovering what it's like to be wealthy adults, I was rediscovering what it was like to have no money, no time and no sleep.  I'm 39 years old, we're planning another baby next year (against my better judgement!) and TBH I wish I'd done it two decades ago when I could still pull all-nighters and get up for work the next day.  When I was 20, everybody said "don't settle down too quick, get out there and enjoy your life while you can."  Well, what did I do when I was 20?  Besides work, I did almost nothing of value.  OK, some of my fiction and music was good, but mostly I wasted my money, I wasted my time and all I did was dream of a future with a family I didn't have.  I could have used my energy and my exuberance to raise a family.  Today I'm sitting awkwardly at my desk because my back hurts; that's what happens when you're nearly 40 and you're carrying around a sick 2-year-old all weekend.

I've had to rethink my RC hobby to fit around time and cash.  I can't afford to buy NIBs and used trades every month like I did.  I'm running out of space for RCs.  I have to squeeze my tinkering time in between 6am and 8am, although recently I'm struggling with the 6am rise and my fiction has fallen way behind.  I get two evenings a week to do what I want - that could be tinkering on a project, working on a new album, writing stories or going to a drift club meet.  I get one weekend per month to go racing or bashing or just go for a motorcycle ride and camp over somewhere.  I have a very strict monthly leisure budget which must cover any RC purchases, alcoholic beverages, club entry fees, nights out with mates, even clothes.  But TBH, I don't see any of this as a bad thing.  For a lot of my life I had way too much time on my hands and I wasted it.  For a long time I had plenty of money and I spent it without thinking.  Now I'm focused.  I make more stuff myself rather than buying it ready made and I enjoy it so much more knowing I made it.  I try to make sure everything I do has value, everything brings me something, everything serves a purpose.  I'm sure I get way more out of my spare time now than I did before, even if overall I'm producing a lot less.  It's better quality, and it's more enjoyable.

I still say my primary hobbies are music and fiction.  Yes, they're way behind schedule, but I gave up having a schedule and life is better now.  My secondary hobby is RC, but sometimes (like the last 2 weeks) it's been nicer to tinker with my projects in the workshop than it has to sit in the studio writing stories or hammering out a new track.  It'll probably take another hit when baby 2 comes along and that's a bridge I'll have to cross when I get there, but for now, RC is still a big part of my life, and as long as funds allow, I'll keep it that way.

:)

 

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13 minutes ago, 78Triumph said:

I know a few people that have no hobbies.  My brother in law is a year younger than me, has high blood pressure, works non stop, travels for work a few times a month, and pretty much has no hobbies or no free time to enjoy them if he did.  He makes a lot of money, but to me it's not worth it.  I enjoy my hobbies and treat them as therapy, and couldn't imagine not having any. 

My sister and her husband are like this.  They're vets and they run their own practice, so they work awkward shift hours - sometimes passing each other on the way to/from work.  That's the careers they chose and they knew full well it would be like that.  As the managers of the practice, they have to step in when staff are short or the manure hits the rotating air circulatory device.  They've got two girls (4 and 7 this year - they even share the same birthday!) who are full of energy and real hard work (I can handle them for about 30 minutes before I'm done).  Every time I see them they look utterly, deeply exhausted.  Often we'll arrange a family get-together and one of them won't be able to show because of a crisis at work.  On the off chance both of them are free to come out, one or both of the kids will be sick (how did our species last this long..?) so they have to stay home anyway.

I don't know that they ever really get time for hobbies, but that's the path they chose.  They have nice holidays every year and they take time to go to shows and events.  I think that's their leisure.  They both love to read (I like reading too, but I can usually manage about 10 minutes of an evening before I fall asleep.  I very rarely choose to go to bed early just to read when I could be up doing something).

My wife and I both said early-on in our relationship that there's no point in working yourself to the bone 50 weeks of the year so you can look forward to 2 weeks in the sunshine.  Better to lay back a bit and try to put a little bit of sunshine into every day, even if that means you can't afford a proper holiday.  That's why I built my camper :)

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Midlife? Definitely. As of a few weeks ago, I'm closer to 50 than 40.

Crisis? Not so much, actually. I don't really feel like I need to make up for lost time, or recapture anything from my youth; there are material things that I want and buy because I remember them from when I was younger and I can afford them now, but it's not because I felt like things were somehow "better" back then. Quite the opposite, in fact. I like being this age. I feel like I've calmed down and just started being who I want to be, instead of worrying about meeting anyone else's approval. I'm not trying to impress or one-up keep up with anyone, and that's a relief.

And I'm happily married, no kids, decent career (even if it's not the most exciting or lucrative path), nice house, all that good stuff. If I'm lacking anything, it's time for hobbies. It's ironic, in a way, because my favorite thing about my hobby time is that there's no deadline - no one is waiting for me to finish this suff. It doesn't have to meet anyone else's expectations. And if I have to go do something else, I can just pick up where I left off later.

Which means, in a way, that Tamiya (and the RC hobby in general) is competing for my time and attention with my MGB and my guitars and home remodeling projects and the little vintage camper we're restoring and whatever else occupies my free time. So now it's up to them to impress me, to meet my expectations, which is why I get dismissive of things like "(insert color here) Edition" re-res and halfhearted Lexan bodies. Tamiya needs me more than I need them.

There was a point to all of this, but I've forgotten it now, and now I have to go to work...

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22 minutes ago, markbt73 said:

my favorite thing about my hobby time is that there's no deadline - no one is waiting for me to finish this suff. It doesn't have to meet anyone else's expectations. And if I have to go do something else, I can just pick up where I left off later.

I love this about RC too.  And as you have an old British car (I used to own classic Minis) you'll know that leaving a project vehicle unfinished in a workshop often results in scratches happening from nowhere, spots of rust appearing where no rust was just a week ago, electrical stuff corroding, locks sticking, brakes seizing, pipes perishing, fuel going off and carburettors getting gummed up.  An classic car project might not have a 'deadline' but a lot of good work can be undone if you leave it unfinished.

You don't get that so much with RC.  Plus it costs next to nothing to keep.

In fact over the last decade I've got so used to the fact that I can throw stuff in a box and walk away (or even leave it on the workbench for a few weeks) that it's almost become an inbuilt part of my thought process.

Which is probably why I had such an unusual thought last night, as I was walking down the garden path having spent a couple of hours on the Drag King project.

You see, over the last two years I've had another fun thing to play with: my daughter.

It was 10pm, and my brain said to me "you could go get her out the box and play with her for 20 minutes before you go to bed."

Even without any family-unfriendly connotations to the above sentence, that's a really weird thought.

But what's even weirder is that I had a follow-up thought that turned into sudden panic as I was half-way down the garden: OMG when did I last get her out of the box?  Is she OK?  When did we last feed her, change her, give her water?

 

For the record, I don't keep my child in a box, and the thought process was probably due to extreme tiredness on my part, plus the worry of her not eating or drinking much this weekend due to having an ear infection, a king of waking dream, if you will.

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1 hour ago, Mad Ax said:

I love this about RC too.  And as you have an old British car (I used to own classic Minis) you'll know that leaving a project vehicle unfinished in a workshop often results in scratches happening from nowhere, spots of rust appearing where no rust was just a week ago, electrical stuff corroding, locks sticking, brakes seizing, pipes perishing, fuel going off and carburettors getting gummed up.  An classic car project might not have a 'deadline' but a lot of good work can be undone if you leave it unfinished.

I have a half finished BSA Lightening in my garage that's a long term project so I can relate to this!  I've kept everything pretty well organized so I'm hoping when I get back into working on it I won't have to re-do a lot of things.

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