Hudson

What's going on with vintage NIB prices

Recommended Posts

14 hours ago, SuperChamp82 said:

have you ever bought NIB ? @S-PCS @Saito2 @markbt73 @WillyChang @NWarty you too ? 

 

 

 

No, and I have no desire to. I think it's sort of weird to buy a toy you can't play with and I don't have enough disposable income to buy a luxury purchase like that. Someone does have to do it to keep some examples preserved, I guess :P

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not RC, no. The closest I have come is building a couple of cars from new-old-stock spare parts. I would certainly like to, someday.

I have bought quite a few NIB static model car kits from the '70s-'80s, some still shrink-wrapped. I always open the shrink-wrap, partly because I want to know that what's supposed to be inside is actually in there, but also because of the "crackle of potential energy" that happens every time you open the box. (What am I babbling about?)

As far as being "toys you can't play with," that's all a matter of perception. I have figured out that the way to handle having NIB unassembled models sitting around is that all of them, from my still-NIB re-re Subaru Brat to my vintage Entex 1/16 scale MG TC kit, have the same status: "to be built someday." Nothing is off-limits or "being saved;" it just hasn't been built yet. This takes the pressure off, takes away the forbidden-fruit aspect of them, and lets me enjoy them as-is until I choose to build them.

This attitude also impacts my buying habits; the future value of a kit doesn't matter at all, only its current price. Is the asking price worth it to me, right now, for my future enjoyment? in the case of a $40 model kit, the answer is usually yes. I have not yet found an RC kit for 10 times as much that I felt would give me 10 times as much enjoyment. That doesn't mean I won't, someday, but if I did spend that much, it would be for the same reason: to build... eventually.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, SuperChamp82 said:

And if it’s more subjective - then why ? @Hudson have you ever bought NIB ? @S-PCS @Saito2 @markbt73 @WillyChang @NWarty you too ? 

As far as vintage NIB? Nope. I'm glad that some people do and I can see their pics online. That's good enough for me. Some should be saved NIB for posterity, I'm just not the guy to do it. If I have a vintage model, its because I "saved" it by restoring it. Its more satisfying for me that way. If I'm running it, I'd rather it be a re-release with fresh plastics. Plus, no guilt of taking a vintage NIB out of circulation. I have some NIB re-releases. They will all be built "some day" however, save one. I'll probably keep a re-re SRB or Egress NIB just because I like the look of the presentation. If It was a typical new Tamiya "parts thrown in a shoebox" and a box lid with a photo sticker slapped on it like a generic CC-01, I could care less. One NIB, blister-equipped, kit is enough for me.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, SuperChamp82 said:

Great thread guys

Honestly wonder if there’s an obvious question here ?

Why do people buy NIB in the first place ? 

If, for some, it’s purely about speculating with cash to burn, then pure law of averages - more of us than them - means they die off quicker / we (ultimately) win the math.

And if it’s more subjective - then why ? @Hudson have you ever bought NIB ? @S-PCS @Saito2 @markbt73 @WillyChang @NWarty you too ? 

I never had - and thought I ever would tbh - but, here’s the thing, I just did ...

It was admittedly a cheap-ish, bargain - but, with some fun finding vintage hop ups + radio gear, I’ll soon build (then run) a piece of my childhood with my kids :) 

And - having broken that taboo, I’m now wondering about more ? 

Or - if @Hudson question was re- framed - which (and how many) NIB kits would I really build with my kids to keep our hobby alive ?  

Its admittedly a bit off the  wall - but surely that’s the long term (and non-commercial) answer to this question ?

Because, if you set aside opportunistic bubbles - which we all control btw - whatever value we instil now dictates whether there’s a hobby gf

And what it’s worth. 

SC

 

 

Why do I buy NIB's? Well that's a mighty good question.  There's just something magical about those old Tamiya kits - the design of the box, the proportions, the colours, the smell, the artwork, the technical drawings on the box sides, the blister packaging, the advertising for other kits of that era on the box dividers.  Honestly, I just don't think it's humanly possible to package a toy in a more appealing way.  

I got in to Tamiya RC as a 37 ish year old after finding my old Falcon in my parents attic (classic I know), I then spent a few years buying built kits with original box and radio gear and I'd strip and clean them and replace parts etc, and then that just kind of evolved into buying NIB's.  And, dare I say it, it seems to be an ok investment - for now at least.  For the record, I have no aspirations of collecting the first 100 kits which others have done and others are aiming for, I couldn't afford it anyway.  I just buy the kits that I really like, and I think the driving force is an artistic one, I choose the kits that I feel look the best (in NIB form - not necessarily in built form)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Started out firmly determined to stay re-re all the way, to not be drawn into the whole originality thing. Lasted two and a half years roughly, then gave in and bought my first NIB, of course it was one I really had to have... Would have settled for the re-re even then, had there been one, but there was none. 

And there are other kits I'd really like to have NIB, kits that have not been re-released, at least as of yet... Like the 959, Celica, Wild Willy... So I'm watching ebay and a number of other sites, waiting for the right NIB occasion to pop up - definitely something I didn't do two years ago. 

And once I have the NIB, why stop there, why not get a nice new-built original runner to match? Or even a NIB to build?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting reading all the different points of view here. 

My enjoyment of this hobby has many levels. I was originally drawn in by the nostalgia for the cars I used to want as a kid but couldn’t afford. I like to restore and display (for my own private viewing) anything that interests me. I like to build and bash new kits with my kids. I like the community and discussion of the hobby in the forums. I like to collect some NIBs that interest me. I like to build NIBs for the fun of it. I sell things to make space or if I change my mind. 

All of this costs money, and often I’ll spend more money than something is worth or sell on at a loss. While not ideal, I’m in this hobby expecting it will cost me money, not make me money. That’s ok. Do golf enthusiasts expect a refund when they retire from their hobby?

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/17/2019 at 11:45 AM, Hudson said:

Hello all, as a modest collector of vintage Tamiya NIB's I've noticed that prices are a bit crazy at the moment.  Does anyone agree with me? I mean, in the 5 years or so that I've been following NIB prices things have moved steadily up but in the last year or so they've jumped!  Let's take the Hotshot for example which is surely one of Tamiyas best kits, though there's a lot of them circulating.  A few years ago you could pick one of these up NIB for £350 ish, it then steadily crept up to £450 ish and then all of a sudden a couple went on eBay for £700 and in one foul swoop this has established the new price.  

When I scan eBay globally I'm just generally very surprised at the prices.   With the exception of my earlier Hotshot observation - on the rare occasion that a nice NIB turns up on an 'auction' format I don't feel that it gets close to the 'Buy it now' prices I'm seeing.  There's a discrepancy between the price sellers are asking and the price people are prepared to pay, at least that's my view, but maybe I'm wrong, I mean - are people buying these kits at these prices?  I guess they must be to some extent.  

I'm pretty sure a Hotshot 2 NIB has recently appeared on eBay for 1300USD!!!

For those of you that have been in this game longer than me are these price jumps the norm?  perhaps my observations are all wrong!

I totally agree!  It has gotten outrageous and like the gentleman responded,, to combat that just don’t pay the crazy prices.  It will go down when they are convenienced they won’t get what they are asking for it.  All they are doing is looking at what is currently the going rate and mirroring the same on their kit. I am restoring a HOTSHOT II and saw the one for 1300.. CRAZY!! I literally pieced every part and though it has taken a while to find the authentic vintage pieces I was able to do it under 300 which to me is a good deal.  I won’t do anything to encourage the price spike and hopefully others won’t either which I believe inevitability it will reduce the prices.  I am a Tamiya RC hobbiest and not interested in the least to make a 600 percent profit on a part that was 4.99 NEW.  Good luck and stay the course

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5 April 2019 at 11:58 AM, SuperChamp82 said:

And if it’s more subjective - then why ? @Hudson have you ever bought NIB ? @S-PCS @Saito2 @markbt73 @WillyChang @NWarty you too ? 

yeah I buy kits, when the price & location is acceptable/attractive

mostly no set intention to build - they're always nice to look at per se. Sometimes as future trade bait. Usually because I don't have space to build them or I already have a wreck or runner example.

True fans of any particular model might seek to have 1 NIB, 1 new built shelf queen & 1 or more runners :) and these days if it gets re-re'd you'd want a re-re NIB too -_- then Tamiya issues even more repops with painted body :blink: etc etc. 

Sometimes ppl sell unused bodyset in its kitbox & manual with original wheels & tyres minus chassis... some might go seek to "complete" that into an NIB kit again either from loose spares or parting a less popular kit.

That last bit is a weird/unique side to our hobby. Maybe the Meccano guys would understand :) afaik not prevalent in any other hobby I'm into. 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some good thoughts here. I guess the final verdict is: there are a lot of factors affecting the current and future values of vintage R/C kits ^_^

I'm late to this thread obviously. But FWIW...

  • I've long felt that as NIB kits become fewer, their value must increase due to simple supply vs demand. @Hudson remember that it's not just about whether people build vintage kits. It's about how, over time, vintage kits fall progressively into the hands of collectors who just do not sell them (until death). Consider the trajectory of a typical leftover vintage kit...
    • The starting point for 99% of the vintage kits we have ever seen for sale on the Internet since 1995, was "leftover shop stock". Apart from a few grandparents attics, there was simply nowhere else they could have all possibly come from, except unsold retail and warehouse inventories. Most of the leftover kits originated from shops in the overstuffed market districts of Japan.
    • The end point for them, is private collections.
    • Many kits do bounce around from seller to seller over the years, getting re-sold and re-sold.
    • Most of the "leftover shop stock" supply has now dried up. It was once a flood (early 2000s). Now it has all but finished.
    • .:. Over time, kits all coalesce toward people who basically want to keep them forever. @RETRO R/C are you still going to be buried with your Sand Rovers? (nice to see you posting here again btw ^_^)  And in the end this means less vintage kits for sale on eBay... until someone dies or decides to sell their whole collection for other reasons.
  • Why do prices fluctuate? Sure, remake kits are one factor. But they are not the only factor. Consider also:
    • Currency conversion rate changes! Here in Australia in the early 2000s, the Australian $1 was worth US50cents. After the GFC, the Australian $1 was worth US$1. That's a massive change. And today it's worth US70cents. This roller coaster has halved and doubled what it has cost me to buy a vintage kit from a US collector, at different times. I bet it's a similar story for all collectors worldwide.
      • When talking about how "kits were worth a lot more in the early 2000s", remember to consider what your currency was worth at that time, relative to Japan, USA, UK, Germany, Australia, or wherever you were buying or selling to.
    • GFC and global downturn hammered the values of all collectables (2007) shortly after Tamiya began issuing remakes of vintage kits (2005). It took a while for markets to recover after this.
    • Seasonal fluctuations. Christmas time is a great time for sellers, and a tricky time for buyers. Trust me - watch the prices carefully at Christmas, and after Christmas.
    • Simple peaks and falls in demand. Sometimes wealthy buyers come along who will pay whatever it takes. When a new high watermark is set, others follow. Yet at other times, you are trying to sell a beautiful kit for a bargain, and nobody wants it. Longtime sellers have seen it all.
  • Did the remakes kill all vintage values?
    • @Shodog  When it comes to NIB kits, they caused bigger falls in the higher priced kits, than the lower priced ones. But it depends on the kit.
      • In my records, SRBs were typically AU$3000 in 2000-2005 (I know because I bought several - including two in 2004). But as I mentioned above, that was the exact equivalent of US$1500 at that time. Today, they are more likely to sell at US$1000 - US$1500. Which is a change. But from my vantage point, not the massive change we might assume.
      • Also, kits like the Hotshot have been remade, yet it's such a popular kit that vintage ones still easily peak at or above their pre-remake prices, each year - at around the US$800 mark, or above (and I am not talking about the earliest vintage type).
  • Are some sellers speculators with high prices?
    • Yes. But some are also just selling for at or near what they paid. Remember, there is no fixed official price for any vintage Tamiya kit - I know of Wild Willy kits that have sold for AU$3000 in the last 5 years, and some that have sold for AU$900. That's a massive range.
      • And let's face it, who among us has not paid a stupid price for something, at some point in this crazy R/C game? :blink: :D I once paid AU$400 for a vintage 20 page Nikko R/C catalogue. True story.
  • What about the prices of remake kits?
    • Whenever Tamiya discontinues remakes, their prices increase too. This pushes up the price of vintage kits, because vintage is always more valuable than remake. But then Tamiya pumps out more remakes, and the prices fall again. We have seen this time and time again.
      • Sidenote: it amazes me that Tamiya are still not capitalizing on the nostalgia of their brand, the way other brands do (like LEGO and Hot Wheels). Tamiya just seems to release novelty stuff as new products. Yet LEGO release loads of cross-promo retro sets, or sets with an intrinsically retro feel to them. And Hot Wheels release loads of highly detailed premium retro model cars that appeal to all the 40-50yo collectors. All Tamiya does is rehash the same hits of the past, ad infinitum, without really developing anything brand new that will appeal to their huge retro R/C collector base. They seem to have no idea why collectors continue to collect. And they seem to do nothing to try to recapture the feel of their 1980s kits, other than issue modified remakes of those 1980s kits. The other new kits they sell, all feel too modern for me to care about them.
  • Why buy vintage kits?
    • Every vintage Tamiya kit box contains 1980s Tamiya air, filled with crazy Japanese creativity. When you breathe this air, you become younger, and more prone to buying more vintage kits. This is a scientific fact.
    • Because they rock more than any other R/C product ever has, or will. B)
    • Because they remain the safest and easiest way to obtain a complete, totally original vintage Tamiya model. Free from mods, remake parts, or printed parts. And these are issues which could become trickier for serious collectors to navigate, in the years ahead.

Phew! Sorry everyone.

cheers,

H.

PS. @OCD  @Saito2 and others... sorry I haven't been around for ages. Thanks for the mentions. I took a break from R/C. Maybe I'll get back into it again, hopefully.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Hibernaculum   Ohhhh nooooo - seems we are both on the comeback trail old mate! ;) Oh how I could inflate this post of yours out. Well conveyed as always my friend.

I just got re-united with the collection, so I can once again share with the world, this time - going much larger with the sharing of information and my collection! ;) And yes - I still have a wish to be cremated with my Rover!

Watch out TC - its gonna get wordy in here! :lol:

Cheers

Darryn

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You guys can get as wordy as you want. That's one of my favorite things about this forum: the discussions. I get tired of "Look what I bought/made/found!", and I like a good long-winded philosophical post.

In fact, I have a question to pose, sort of a hypothetical situation: for those of you with huge collections, particularly multiples of the same kit, what exactly is the draw of having 3 or 4 (or more) of the same kit? And (again, hypothetically), if someone approached you about buying one of them, what would your reaction be? Would you consider selling the "worst" one, knowing that you have other, nicer examples?

Now, keep in mind that in the past couple of years I have started to collect NIB vintage static model kits, which have at least as much nostalgic appeal to me as RC kits. Maybe more, in fact, because I was building them for many years before I got into RC. It's a very similar mindset, but on a smaller scale (both physically and financially). And as such, I can answer this question for myself, and the answer is "It depends." I don't buy anything (model kits, RC cars, real cars, guitars, or anything else) with an eye towards selling it. I have, in the past. I spent quite a few years restoring and flipping vintage RC cars, and I'm happy to say that I was able to come out just a little bit ahead doing so. (I of course immediately spent that profit on more RC stuff, but I digress.) But I got tired of that game, and these days if I buy something, it's probably going to stay with me.

Which means I'm very selective about what I buy. Three times already, I have passed over buying kits I already have, because owning a second one seemed silly. But there are certain kits which, if I found another, I would buy, especially if I found an older or nicer example.

At that point, the less-nice or less-desirable-box kit is still not going to be sold. It's going to be built, and displayed with the nice one. In my head, I have a vision of my study/workshop in my retirement days, and the shelves (those that are not overflowing with books) are lined with model cars: a built example sitting in front of a NIB example. At that point, if I already have a "keeper" and a "builder," I don't need any more of that kit. However, if I did come across a bargain on something I already have, I would still buy it... but I would be buying it to sell. For a profit, naturally.

So, over to you, NIB RC kit collectors: if I (hypothetically, although I wish I could do it for real) saw that you had a stack of 4 vintage Boomerangs (or something), and I wanted to buy one, would you sell me the one with the little water stain on the box lid, or the cracked blister pack, for a fair price? Or can you just not get by with three? And if not, why not? I don't mean for this to sound confrontational; I'm honestly trying to understand.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Completely agree about more thoughtful posts @markbt73

And @Saito2 often tees them up :) 

But you’ve offered up a cracker there sir ! 

Many will wade in with passion about any decent collector owning a NIB, NIB built, runner and basher of every model they love ...

And, fwiw, I can sort of see their point - I mean why not ? Admire, build, run, thrash ? What’s not to like about that ?

But, for me, it’s pure idealism vs the reality of building (then maintaining) that sort of collection ... whilst simultaneously  scratching the (almost ubiquitous) itch of owning all the multiple kits we wanted as kids !

Not that it matters, but it’s equally financial suicide having gone down the ‘multiples’ road before 🙄

So, for me, it’s one of each I’m after these days - whether NIB, NIB built or runner. With trading kept to a minimum.

Not sure I’ll ever get into bashing 40 year old nostalgia - just feels kind of wrong to me ... but hats off to you guys who do.

Its what they were made for after all !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, markbt73 said:

So, over to you, NIB RC kit collectors: if I (hypothetically, although I wish I could do it for real) saw that you had a stack of 4 vintage Boomerangs (or something), and I wanted to buy one, would you sell me the one with the little water stain on the box lid, or the cracked blister pack, for a fair price? Or can you just not get by with three? And if not, why not?

No. No they are all mine! They are my precious (in Gollum voice). Seriously though, I'm not in position to answer that as I don't understand it myself. I can not get head around someone with multiple NIB vintage kits sitting stacked up in a basement or warehouse or whatever. However, like Mark, I do want to understand why. I'm not mad or jealous as I don't have horse in this race so to speak. I'm just curious. No judgement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Saito2 said:

I'm just curious. No judgement.

I'm a little bit judgey. But mostly curious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For what its worth, here goes for me...

Why do I have multiple of some kits NIB? Then new builds and runners as well? (I am not going to answer for anyone other than myself - however, when discussing this with some\ other large collectors, I will say that we seem all on similar thought processes).The answers to this question are two fold:

  • Because I love the car that much. Simple as that. If its a car like the Sand Rover, I have 2 NIB, 2 new built and some runners/projects....yep - the Sand Rover is my favourite all-time Tamiya - their simplest buggy ever...it invokes a memory in me that just takes me back to my youth, carrying it around in a backpack while juggling the TX in one hand and pedalling my pushbike to the local park. These kits invoke so many feelings in a lot of us that are difficult to explain. So, if I was able to manage it, I got as many of my dream cars NIB. This was the first thing I started to do when clearing out old distributors and shops here in Australia and abroad. (but that's another story). It was a monumental task, I was just lucky enough to ride the wave in the "Golden Era" of Vintage R/C collecting.

 

  •  A NIB kit is just that - it has everything to realise before it. It has so much potential. It screams to be built in my mind, however, I know that these original kits are getting fewer and fewer, especially with people building NIB kits for display etc. That in itself is a beautiful thing, however, once it has been assembled by its owner and displayed - its only potential now is to be run and become "just" another built and run car. (AGAIN - please note that I love them any way they are - I am not putting down used cars!!) Whilst I fully appreciate the joy and passion involved with opening the kit, feeling the trepidation of cutting into those blisters or parts bags, I truly feel that I am preserving history. To me - this has been more than a hobby. It has taught me many things about life, how things work, relationships - you name it. Then there is the attachment to remembering the past - what we once truly came from. We need to preserve that box of history, so that it isn't just pictured on the internet somewhere in the future, actually having these works of art so that they can be held and seen. Most of you know the feeling - the little glimmer of joy that comes over you when you open the NIB kit and see the parts there - all glistening and ready to achieve their potential, well, all that goes when the last NIB is built. So - maybe I am a hopeless romantic and want to actually be able to touch and hold what it could be. I am fortunate enough to have silly numbers of runners and projects, so maybe I see the whole spectrum - from the dodgiest of TL01 cars through to Mint AYK Vipers etc. If you have the built car in your hand, you are enjoying the very thing that it was designed for. The NIB kit is what we all aspired to when we were young. There are so very many used and new built cars available, for me personally, I saw it "saving" them from being built and preserved for the future. So, I guess I "abstain" from building, because I know I am saving something truly worthwhile in many peoples eyes.

I really have glossed over some other reasons etc, however, I don't want to put anyone to sleep! Having said all of this, I am also pretty well known for absolutely driving the snot out my runners and vintage racers. I have raced brand new built AYK Vipers, Marui Samurais and many others. These cars were designed to be used. I have restored old race cars to pristine condition again and been successful racing them. I guess what I am saying is that for me - this hobby is doing what you love for you, don't question others motivations (unless they think they can buy on eBay as an "investment"), be grateful that we have this awesome hobby. I get a kick out of seeing a rare car run as much as I do seeing it NIB. 

So in closing....

Hi, my name is Darryn, Im a vintage R/C addict.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, RETRO R/C said:

I truly feel that I am preserving history

 

41 minutes ago, RETRO R/C said:

the little glimmer of joy that comes over you when you open the NIB kit and see the parts there

A really great post mate ^_^

You kinda said it all there. It's so good to have you back, and writing like that.

And thank you to others also, for the nice comments. According to my post history, it's now been 14years :blink:... since I first posted here. And back in the day, I was late to the party, having lurked for years beforehand. Where do the years go?

I really did not expect to return to these TC forums this week, and stumble upon this discussion... But what a joy it is to read.  Darryn, I am super glad to hear that your collection has survived in tact too. Life takes some awful turns. We've all been through a lot.

I think from this point onward, we've all had enough mid-life drama. Older blokes are generally allowed to play with toys in later life, right through until they kick the bucket. What do you say we make that the focus from here onward? ;)

13 hours ago, markbt73 said:

if I (hypothetically, although I wish I could do it for real) saw that you had a stack of 4 vintage Boomerangs (or something), and I wanted to buy one, would you sell me the one with the little water stain on the box lid, or the cracked blister pack, for a fair price?

Short answer - yes I would probably sell you the 4th Boomerang kit. :)  But being a nerd, I would probably write you a 1 page essay about it's condition, and make sure you were happy with the price. :rolleyes:

A year or so ago, I had four NIB original Fox kits. I think that's the most I have ever had of one particular kit. And I must admit, it was a surreal feeling. It almost made me feel like building and running one :D  But that's nothing compared to some of the old galleries on TC, where some owners had many more than that.  And let's not forget  @typischdesign ... and the stories of 20 or 30 original Hotshot kits.

My current status is that, for most of my favourite vintage kit models (which are mostly buggies), I have 2 of each vintage kit. But there are a few holes in the collection where only 1 kit has been possible. Some I have just never quite gotten around to. Some losses we can call "battle scars" - caused by past relationships, or the fallout thereof.

But for the most part, the hibernaculum ship of vintage R/C madness has mostly held water over the years, through the ups and downs of life. To this day I do not have too many regretful "lost" items from the collection. And the ones I did lose, have been replaced by other interesting bits and pieces I picked up instead. Overall, I am happy with things, and most of all grateful to have what I have. All of which has been bought bit by bit, over the course of 25 years.

Ok, so why do people have multiple kits...

My original plan was to do the "holy trilogy" and have 3 of each car. <_<

  1. NIB kit I never build. To display as a kit.
  2. NIB kit I build (guilt-free). To display as the model, but never run.
  3. An original restoration, using nothing but original parts.

And I achieved that for at least 10 cars at one point.

But the problem with this system was, I usually found I put sooo much effort into the #3's (restorations) that I actually began to feel too tired to do the #2's!  The big problem with me is that "restoration" doesn't just mean throwing together a basher. To me, a restoration is almost a new build in itself. Let me explain how a restoration goes for me... :blink:

  • I start with a used car that I find somewhere. And pull it apart completely.
  • Then I clean every single part, right down to the screw thread.
  • Then I assess every part. If ANY part is broken, it gets replaced by a NIP original part.
  • Then I put it together, 100% according to kit spec and catalogue photos.
  • I always build with grease, oil, and a full AM radio set (even though it may never be run, I like all cars to be run-spec)
  • Regardless of the condition of the used parts it came with, the following items are ALWAYS replaced with NIP original parts, without compromise:
    • Body
    • Tyres
    • MSC

Case in point - the built Hotshot featured here years ago, was just a resto done exactly according to the above.... but I built it like my life depended on it :rolleyes:  And after all that work, I realized I didn't feel like building another NIB Hotshot. :huh:  Which made me think - why have all the kits?!

My revised approach...

Nowadays, I don't really worry about the "holy trilogy". Mainly because I don't worry so much about used restoration.

My new approach goes like this:

  1. NIB kit I never build. To display as a kit.
  2. NIB kit I build (guilt-free). To display as the model, but never run.
  3. ...but I don't specifically seek out a 3rd used model for restoration. If one happens to land in my lap, then I will still restore it because I feel sorry for it. But otherwise, I don't stress about doing a resto of everything.

Sometime around 2014/2015 I sold off many of the used models I had, and just kept the kits. This means less "restoration fatigue", because I really do want the chance (before I die) to enjoy building a NIB kit of every favourite model, without feeling like I have already done that model to death via a fussy restoration :P

It's not just kits you know...

The multiple NIB disease affects all toy collecting. I know someone in Australia who has about 5 or 6 vintage NIB Taiyo Jet Hoppers (worth AU$500-$1000 each), plus loads of priceless spares. He pretty much collects nothing else besides the Jet Hopper.

Factors affecting inability to have multiples of a certain kit...

  • Lack of money
  • Stupidity (e.g. missing a good opportunity)
  • Impossible to find (a couple of my favourite kits are just impossible to find a second NIB example of)
  • Women (sometimes they just get in the way of kit collecting)
  • Space

And so it goes :rolleyes:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies. I guess maybe I'm not meant to understand. I get the nostalgia, I get the potential-energy thing (in fact, I've written about it myself), and I get the love of a particular kit. And 2 makes sense, so that one can be built/used one day. I'll just never understand the appeal of stacks and stacks of the exact same thing, no matter how cool it is.

But then, I spent this weekend piecing together 2 Associated RC10s from nothing but the "leftover" parts I have had sitting around for years. They're not pretty, and they're not "correct," but I'm sure they'll both go around the local indoor carpet track just fine, and that's what they're for. And I'd honestly rather own them than 2 NIB RC10 kits.

So I'll leave the new-in-box RC collecting to those who have the means and space, I guess. I'll stick to my NIB 1/24-1/25 static kits. But only one of each. Or maybe two. Two's good.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, markbt73 said:

Thanks for the replies. I guess maybe I'm not meant to understand. I get the nostalgia, I get the potential-energy thing (in fact, I've written about it myself), and I get the love of a particular kit. And 2 makes sense, so that one can be built/used one day. I'll just never understand the appeal of stacks and stacks of the exact same thing, no matter how cool it is.

But then, I spent this weekend piecing together 2 Associated RC10s from nothing but the "leftover" parts I have had sitting around for years. They're not pretty, and they're not "correct," but I'm sure they'll both go around the local indoor carpet track just fine, and that's what they're for. And I'd honestly rather own them than 2 NIB RC10 kits.

So I'll leave the new-in-box RC collecting to those who have the means and space, I guess. I'll stick to my NIB 1/24-1/25 static kits. But only one of each. Or maybe two. Two's good.

Bit of a side track, as far as RC10's go, (I'm no expert) I really dont think there is a "correct" rebuild (other than early Edingers :o). These things got so heavily modified right throughout there life cycles than any "pan" than is built complete is an RC10 IMHO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, mtbkym01 said:

Bit of a side track, as far as RC10's go, (I'm no expert) I really dont think there is a "correct" rebuild (other than early Edingers :o). These things got so heavily modified right throughout there life cycles than any "pan" than is built complete is an RC10 IMHO

Don't say that over at RC10Talk. They'll go on and on about the minutiae of each and every production year, and every tiny little difference... whether you want them to or not...

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, markbt73 said:

Don't say that over at RC10Talk. They'll go on and on about the minutiae of each and every production year, and every tiny little difference... whether you want them to or not...

I know this from first hand experience :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, markbt73 said:

Thanks for the replies. I guess maybe I'm not meant to understand. I get the nostalgia, I get the potential-energy thing (in fact, I've written about it myself), and I get the love of a particular kit. And 2 makes sense, so that one can be built/used one day. I'll just never understand the appeal of stacks and stacks of the exact same thing, no matter how cool it is.

But then, I spent this weekend piecing together 2 Associated RC10s from nothing but the "leftover" parts I have had sitting around for years. They're not pretty, and they're not "correct," but I'm sure they'll both go around the local indoor carpet track just fine, and that's what they're for. And I'd honestly rather own them than 2 NIB RC10 kits.

So I'll leave the new-in-box RC collecting to those who have the means and space, I guess. I'll stick to my NIB 1/24-1/25 static kits. But only one of each. Or maybe two. Two's good.

I think your plastic kit collecting is pretty much identical to NIB R/C kit collecting though, in it's core inspiration/motivation... I mean, how can it not be? ^_^

Despite my previous lengthy post, I may not have answered the question properly last time. Actual reasons for owning multiple NIB R/C kits, are:

  • Packaging/Presentation. This is obviously the big reason. If you always have 1 NIB example left of a kit, you can always enjoy the NIB packaging.
    • Unlike other toys and hobbies - NIB vintage R/C car kits were extra special in their presentation and the complexity of their parts, and this is a major reason why collectors refrain from building them, love keeping them unbuilt, and love owning more than one where possible. Even most other vintage hobby items (boats, trains, planes) don't really compared to old R/C car kits. (Slot cars and some plastic kits, come the closest.)
  • Builder's remorse. By having more than 1 NIB, you can be certain that if you build one, it's not the last NIB on earth (or that you will ever see).

I'm guessing that packaging and remorse are also factors in own more than one NIB plastic model kit? :D

And let's face it - when you get into the bigger plastic model kits - 1/8, 1/10, 1/12 - they are the direct brothers of many early R/C models. And many of the early R/C brands began solely as plastic kit makers (incl. Tamiya). Many early R/C models were just extensions of pre-existing 1/12 plastic kits - especially those from Tamiya, Nichimo, Otaki, Eidai and other great Japanese plastic model companies.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
 
 
 
3
57 minutes ago, Hibernaculum said:
 
 
1
15 hours ago, Hibernaculum said:

A really great post mate ^_^

You kinda said it all there. It's so good to have you back, and writing like that.

Darryn, I am super glad to hear that your collection has survived in tact too. Life takes some awful turns. We've all been through a lot.

 

 

Thanks very much old mate, I am a bit rusty on the typing front - but brain and memories etc kicking into gear. Recovery has been an extremely long and difficult road - but I can see the light now. All the surgeries and other issues took their toll, and ultimately just about everything I had ever worked for. I have "most" of my collection, sadly it seems that it was decided that I didn't need some of my stuff - which is still unaccounted for, however, I am hopeful it will turn up - although I swear I have seen some of my stuff for sale. Anyway - I have what I have and am keen to share again. This hobby is to cool not to be involved again. I have set up a new FB Group and You Tube channel - so I have some pretty big ideas etcThe coming months are going to be spent re-aquiting myself with my collection.

 

 
 
 
57 minutes ago, Hibernaculum said:
 
 
 
 
 
 
12 hours ago, markbt73 said:

And 2 makes sense, so that one can be built/used one day. I'll just never understand the appeal of stacks and stacks of the exact same thing, no matter how cool it is.

But then, I spent this weekend piecing together 2 Associated RC10s from nothing but the "leftover" parts I have had sitting around for years. They're not pretty, and they're not "correct," but I'm sure they'll both go around the local indoor carpet track just fine, and that's what they're for. And I'd honestly rather own them than 2 NIB RC10 kits.

So I'll leave the new-in-box RC collecting to those who have the means and space, I guess. I'll stick to my NIB 1/24-1/25 static kits. But only one of each. Or maybe two. Two's good.

 

So two makes sense! ;) It always does, one to keep NIB, one to build and admire or run. All a "collector", as you call them, is doing is having another to build and run.....but what is a "collector" - this term is often used in a negative connotation - like they are not truly enthusiasts for the hobby. I am not saying you are implying this - however, this kind of language has been used before and some quite robust discussions have been held online and in person with regard to this. There are some "collectors" that do buy for "numbers" and to be impressive, but they are all pretty much gone, cause they simply just ran out of space, money and wait for it - enthusiasm. Whilst many see me personally as a "collector" - I actually don't "identify" as one. I prefer enthusiast. I love all aspects of the hobby, and just happen to have completed and built my collection through good fortune,  management and hard work. I have had 4 of some models NIB - it just so happened that way by chance, I usually sell them all off if I don't have a connection to the model, or I do the trilogy thing if it is something I truly connect with. I can understand 3 NIB myself -  but not if you have new builts, runners and projects as well. This is where the line is muddy between a "collector" in the "box gatherer" sense and the person that collects because of pure passion. Having said all of this, everyone's motivations for this hobby are different. We all love different things, different aspects of this hobby. At the end of the day, we don't really have to understand why someone wants 4 or 40 NIB versions of one kit. I admire their tenacity for finding and procuring them. Again, I am not pointing fingers or being Alouf etc - just my perspective.

RC10's are worse than Losi - but not by much when it comes to period correct etc.:)  Funny - you kind of answered your own question here - you would rather have 2 running and functioning RC10's than 2 NIB!! You prefer the tangible feel, running, moving animated effect these cars have. A NIB is not that to you - it doesn't light your fire. That is your passion. Some people like the potentiality that I mentioned previously. It's cool not to "get it" - you don't have to - we should love and respect the hobby in all its forms. ( This comment is not directed at you specifically - but you raised a good example).

Be careful, your static collecting habits may filter to your RC ones!! Again, you see the appeal. It isn't always about means or space either when it comes to NIB. There can be many reasons why people do things the way they do. At the end of the day though - this hobby is something different - but something also uniting to all of us. We all love this stuff - and ultimately that's why we share our passions for these fantastic pieces of history.

 

*****Please note - these are my thoughts, not directed at anyone in particular - I have had these debates before - so I am glossing over and getting down to tacks as far as I see it. No offence is intended to anyone.*****

 

Cheers

 

Darryn

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Hibernaculum said:
  • Packaging/Presentation. This is obviously the big reason. If you always have 1 NIB example left of a kit, you can always enjoy the NIB packaging.
    • Unlike other toys and hobbies - NIB vintage R/C car kits were extra special in their presentation and the complexity of their parts, and this is a major reason why collectors refrain from building them, love keeping them unbuilt, and love owning more than one where possible. Even most other vintage hobby items (boats, trains, planes) don't really compared to old R/C car kits. (Slot cars and some plastic kits, come the closest.)
  • Builder's remorse. By having more than 1 NIB, you can be certain that if you build one, it's not the last NIB on earth (or that you will ever see)

I can get behind these reasons. I have one NIB Tamiya simply for the presentation factor. If Tamiya hadn't put so much care into presentation at one time, this factor would be harder to understand.

I can definitely understand builder's remorse. This is why I stay away from collecting vintage NIB kits. All that untapped potential of an unbuilt kit is too tempting yet I'd hate to not preserve history by removing a NIB from circulation by building it. I leave that up to others with more money and will power.

I can even understand multiples of one particularly beloved kit. No real logic behind it, just passion.

I dig have multiple NIB kits based on production changes throughout the kit;s lifespan

What I still don't get (and its a personal hang up of mine to understand people) is the rare person that has 6 or more of the same kit. Perhaps its just as Darryn says, just to be impressive.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It occurs to me that I have already written about all of this at some length, so I should just post a link to that...

https://dustylexan.wordpress.com/2018/10/06/a-hoard-by-any-other-name/

https://paintandcementnotincluded.wordpress.com/2019/02/24/at-what-price-happiness/

https://paintandcementnotincluded.wordpress.com/2018/08/08/the-draw-of-old-unassembled-model-kits/

But I guess my central question remains: not "why do you have so many," but "would you be willing to help someone else starting a smaller collection, by selling them one of your many, for a fair price, and if not, why not?"

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now