graemevw

Cad design for fibre lyte

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Im toying with trying do draw up some parts to get made. I know NOTHING about this kind of thing though although my girlfriend can prob help.

Any recommendations on easy to use, free software to use and any tips on doing this? 

I can measure the parts accurately, just no idea on what comes next!

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Can't help with software apart from trying Google sketchup. All my stuff is pro level for my job so I can't help on what to use really. How to use is relatively simple if you can accurately measure. Draw, print on paper at 100% scale, cut out and trial fit on the buggy. There is nothing like seeing the real size template to help you figure out things you need to consider

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I use Inkscape for vector drawing and parts design.  It's more of a vector drawing package than a CAD package but AFAIK it can export in the common CAD formats.  My wife used to use it for designing 2D parts for a laser cutter.  In it's favour, it's free and has a pretty big community for support - I've never found something I'm totally unable to do.

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Emachine shop is good for free 2d (basic 3d) it's basically MS Paint with numbers. 

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Oh and if you can't get to grips with software but can do a dimensioned drawing I am happy to draw parts up :)

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I've had some help from a fellow member on here. If your lucky he may see this and offer his help. But I don't wanna say his name incase he doesn't wanna do it.

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12 minutes ago, TwistedxSlayer said:

I've had some help from a fellow member on here. If your lucky he may see this and offer his help. But I don't wanna say his name incase he doesn't wanna do it.

😀

Its fine. Im sure ill be able to work something out. I quite like the idea of learning how to do this. I can make most stuff, have a few machines, ALOT of tools and a large workshop. I have always shied away from anything computer bases. Will be a good skill to master.

If i REALLY cant do it, then ill look into asking for assistance. 

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I've been using Fusion 360 off and on. It's free if you register as a student or hobbyist (less than $100k USD per year to qualify). Bit of a learning curve as it's my first time in CAD but very powerful.

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I downloaded inkscape and had a play. Admittedly i dont know what im doing, but i found it a nightmare to try and use. I can draw, i can measure, bit what i cant do is plot points. 

I want to be able to plot accurate hole markings, preferably by typing in dimensions rather than trying to drag with the mouse, then once the holes are plotted, draw lines around the outside to get the shape of the piece.

There must be a simple program where i can tell it to place a mark, then place another 36mm to the left, then another 10mm up etc etc to get a layout of hole centers, then draw a shape around the lot.

Maybe ill try google sketchup next.

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My GF has just shown me how to use adobe illustrator and i think were good to go!

 

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I have managed to draw the first piece up. I drew it 100% to scale and used 0.001 rgb red lines. I thought this would be ok but i just noticed they want dimensions on the drawings. 

Has anyone sent files to fibre lyte? Do they use the actual drawing or just program in the dimensions on the drawing? Wondered how i do the dimension lines etc without them also being cut. Or do i put them on a different layer? Or send two drawings?

I can draw it up, just not sure exactly what i need to send them. 

Ive e.mailed to ask but wont get a reply till monday and id like to continue with this tomorrow if poss.

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You can put the dimensions in a different layer, they probably need the dimensions to feed the CNC machine. Or they would need a cam format file.

 

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They will import your file into their software and do the necessary editing to ensure that it is cut as intended with their machine. 

Usually they will want a dimension to confirm the scale of the drawing so there isn't some misunderstanding and you get parts that are overall bigger/smaller than expected. It can also clarify if the finished dimension of the part is inside, outside or down the centre of the lines if the lines are drawn with non-negligible thickness. Labelling the finished sizes of some holes (e.g. 'ø3mm') will also help communicate how you've drawn things.

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Jumping in here as I'm going through the same thing atm but not sending it off to be made, going to attempt to make it myself. 

Dumb question - how big is an M3 hole? I always thought 3mm, but have measured them at 2.8mm consistently. Does that mean an M3 screw is 3mm, so the hole is drilled 2.8mm to allow the screw to bite in?

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Depends how tight of a fit you want and how well made the screws are. I think ideally M3 screws are maximum of 3.0mm but they are always smaller because the threads are a bit rounded over. If the material that the hole is in is hard (e.g. stainless steel), you will want to make your hole at least 3.0mm to ensure that the threads don't bind up in the hole due to slight misalignment. If i want an M3 screw to self tap into soft plastic, use a 2.5mm hole. If a bit of slop is no problem you might even make your holes 3.2mm for ease of assembly, especially if you've got a lot of holes to line up. If you want an optimum fit then you can always start off with the holes small and re-drill them larger as necessary during assembly.

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I always design my 3d printed stuff a little too small on bores I can get a drill in so I can chase them out accurately. I bought a 3.1mm drill bit for a CNC machine. It's really accurate and super sharp so cuts really nice clearance holes for 3mm screws. As mentioned above, 2.5mm is the minor diameter of an M3 thread. 

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Thanks everyone.

I need to redraw it and make it a bit wider around the holes anyway so ill do one without dimensions and one with. Im not sure understand layers properly.

 

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Here’s my two pence:

Drawing package

I  draw the part in a cad programme at 1 unit = 1mm. However, whatever you draw in, make sure it’s a vector format, not raster. 

 

Measuring

I measure the parts using a metal scale rule and sometimes digital callipers.

Tamiya normally space their holes at specific distances from one another, like 25mm, 10mm, etc, and also at specific distances from the centre line of the part (if relevant). 

These dimensions are centre to centre of the holes. These can be measured  using the ruler to derive this distance as a radius around that hole. These radii are useful to then plot onto the drawing as you can use these as a cross check when you’re trying to match and reproduce multiple holes at various angles from one another. I should really invest in an angle measuring device. 

 

Outer edges

Tamiya edge radii are usually 2, 3 or 5mm from my experience. Useful to know, as certain damper mounts rely on the outer edge radii to slot neatly onto another part, such as a gearbox case (top force front damper mount, for example)  

 

Scanning

Ive tried scanning parts before to then trace the part in the cad programme, but I’ve never found this to be accurate. The scan never seems to come out ‘flat’.  Others have had success with this method. 

 

File format

I always send a .DWG format cad drawing to Fiberlyte, they can cut it directly. Most or all vector drawing programmes, including Illustrator, can normally output to this format. I don’t include dimension annotation on the file.

 

Holes

Given that you’re presumably sending them a part to be cut in carbon, you should draw your m3 hole diameters at 3mm or 3.1mm, for a snug fit. Obviously you’re not screwing into the carbon itself, merely using a nut and bolt type mechanical clamping to the carbon face , so the hole needs to be as big as, or just a little bit bigger than, the m3 screw. As stated above, plastic holes are a smaller diameter as the screw is required to bite into the plastic itself (what I call ‘destructive’ fixing, as this makes replacements of screws in the long terms harder to achieve, although there are various techniques to mitigate this - I digress, however, this is another thread topic!)

 

Print first

Always helps to print the drawing 1:1 to cross check the part with the dimensions for fitting etc. (I think @ThunderDragonCy calls this ‘Paper Engineering(tm)’  ). Do his before sending anything for cutting...nothing more disappointing than the excitement of receiving a shiny new custom part... that doesn’t fit.... :) 

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1 hour ago, ALEXKYRIAK said:

Here’s my two pence:

Drawing package

I  draw the part in a cad programme at 1 unit = 1mm. However, whatever you draw in, make sure it’s a vector format, not raster. 

 

Measuring

I measure the parts using a metal scale rule and sometimes digital callipers.

Tamiya normally space their holes at specific distances from one another, like 25mm, 10mm, etc, and also at specific distances from the centre line of the part (if relevant). 

These dimensions are centre to centre of the holes. These can be measured  using the ruler to derive this distance as a radius around that hole. These radii are useful to then plot onto the drawing as you can use these as a cross check when you’re trying to match and reproduce multiple holes at various angles from one another. I should really invest in an angle measuring device. 

 

Outer edges

Tamiya edge radii are usually 2, 3 or 5mm from my experience. Useful to know, as certain damper mounts rely on the outer edge radii to slot neatly onto another part, such as a gearbox case (top force front damper mount, for example)  

 

Scanning

Ive tried scanning parts before to then trace the part in the cad programme, but I’ve never found this to be accurate. The scan never seems to come out ‘flat’.  Others have had success with this method. 

 

File format

I always send a .DWG format cad drawing to Fiberlyte, they can cut it directly. Most or all vector drawing programmes, including Illustrator, can normally output to this format. I don’t include dimension annotation on the file.

 

Holes

Given that you’re presumably sending them a part to be cut in carbon, you should draw your m3 hole diameters at 3mm or 3.1mm, for a snug fit. Obviously you’re not screwing into the carbon itself, merely using a nut and bolt type mechanical clamping to the carbon face , so the hole needs to be as big as, or just a little bit bigger than, the m3 screw. As stated above, plastic holes are a smaller diameter as the screw is required to bite into the plastic itself (what I call ‘destructive’ fixing, as this makes replacements of screws in the long terms harder to achieve, although there are various techniques to mitigate this - I digress, however, this is another thread topic!)

 

Print first

Always helps to print the drawing 1:1 to cross check the part with the dimensions for fitting etc. (I think @ThunderDragonCy calls this ‘Paper Engineering(tm)’  ). Do his before sending anything for cutting...nothing more disappointing than the excitement of receiving a shiny new custom part... that doesn’t fit.... :) 

Thanks.

That is all pretty much exactly what ive done, however, they told me they wanted dxf files. I can send them either.

Ive redrawn it and given them 2 versions, one with measurements and one without so they can cut directly or input the measurements.

Once i know i can give them a usable file, i will draw the other items up, print them on card first to check, then get them all cut at once. I just want them to confirm the file is good before i spend a few days doing the other parts.

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Woohoo, e.mail response from fibrelyte, files are usable. They just asked to draw in black rather than red.

Time to get the rest drawn so i can check them all in card!

Exciting times 😀 

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