Don79

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Why upside down when they are right ways up in photos ūüėā

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Before doing a bunch of upgrades to your TT02B, just get it together and run it. Parts can be replaced as they break.

The only must have is the ball bearing kit. As suggested, get the rubber sealed bearings from RC Bearings in the UK. You can stick with the stock motor and see how you like it. Otherwise, if you're already ordering from Tamico, the Absima 3421 kv brushless motor I suggested is a nice option. Works great and the stock pinion is perfect for the KV. Only other option besides the bearings I'd consider adding right away, would be the Yeah Racing motor mount. You can also get that from Tamico.

I would stick with the stock pinion for now. Besides, pinions are cheaper to replace, so why add a hard steel pinion that will just wear your plastic spur prematurely? I prefer to replace pinions rather than spur gears, but that's just me. If you use the fully adjustable Yeah Racing motor mount that do not flex like the stock plastic mount, and also meshes the gears better, the stock pinion will serve you well for quite some time.

Lastly let me add a few observations regarding servos, lipos and chargers. Get a low profile servo if you can. You might like the added room it will provide for your electronics in the chassis. This can become particularly handy if you want to upgrade the ESC down the line as some aftermarket ESC's take up more space than others.

Consider ordering lipos and a charger from Hobbyking Europe. I tend to find that the UK prices from some of the other suggested stores are not always competitive, and a lot of those UK places charge a pretty hefty sum for shipping to Europe and Scandinavia. If you order from Hobbyking Europe you get shipping for free when ordering for more then 50 Euro and they have a nice selection of batteries. I just ordered one of these as an extra charger a month ago, and it's really great. https://hobbyking.com/en_us/accuell-s60-ac-charger-eu-plug.html  it does things correct and will also handle my LIHV packs.

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1 hour ago, DK308 said:

I would stick with the stock pinion for now. Besides, pinions are cheaper to replace, so why add a hard steel pinion that will just wear your plastic spur prematurely?

In my experience, a hard steel pinion doesn't wear out the spur prematurely! If anything, it prolongs its life.

A soft pinion wears its teeth to a shark fin profile which places uneven pressure on the teeth of the spur gear, accelerating its wear. The metal particles that wear away from the pinion mix with the gearbox grease, turning it into a grey sludgy grinding paste which also accelerates wear.

A hard steel pinion holds its shape for longer, maintaining even pressure on the teeth of the spur, helping it to last longer too. Plus, since it sheds fewer particles, the gearbox grease isn't contaminated as quickly, retaining its lubricating properties.

Tamiya acknowledge this and provide a hard steel pinion as standard with the DF-02 and TT-02B. So by all means use the stock one, but if you want to fit a different pinion, why downgrade to soft alloy? Best keep with steel IMO.

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15 hours ago, Cephas said:

Why upside down when they are right ways up in photos ūüėā

Australian?

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3 hours ago, DK308 said:

Before doing a bunch of upgrades to your TT02B, just get it together and run it. Parts can be replaced as they break.

The only must have is the ball bearing kit. As suggested, get the rubber sealed bearings from RC Bearings in the UK. You can stick with the stock motor and see how you like it. Otherwise, if you're already ordering from Tamico, the AbsimÔĽŅaÔĽŅ 3421 kv brushless motor I suggested is a nice¬†option.¬†Works great and the stock pinion is perfect for the KV. Only other option besides the bearings I'd consider adding right away, would be the Yeah Racing motor mount. You can also get that from Tamico.

I would stick with the stock pinion for now. Besides, pinions are cheaper to replace, so why add a hard steel pinion that will just wear your plastic spur prematurely? I prefer to replace pinions rather than spur gears, but that's just me. If you use the fully adjustable Yeah Racing motor mount that do not flex like the stock plastic mount, and also meshes the gears betÔĽŅter, the stock pinion will serve you well for quite some time.

Lastly let me add a few observations regarding servos, lipos and chargeÔĽŅrs. Get a low profile servo if you can. You might like the added room it will provide for your electronics in the chassis. This can become particularly handy if you want to upgrade the ESC down the line as some aftermarket ESC's take up more spacÔĽŅe than others.ÔĽŅ

Consider ordering lipos and a charger from Hobbyking Europe. I tend to find that the UK prices from some of the other suggested stores are not always competitive, and a lot of those UK places charge a pretty hefty sum for shipping to Europe and Scandinavia. If you order from Hobbyking Europe you get shipping for free when ordering for more then 50 Euro and they have a nice selection of batteries. I just ordered one of these as an extra charger a month ago, and it's really great. https://hobbyking.com/en_us/accuell-s60-ac-charger-eu-plug.html  it does things correct and will also handle my LIHV packs.

Thanks for the advice!

I did not think that motor was sensored which I believe is required with the stock ESC. And the ESC doesn't permit lipos as far as I've read so I guess Lipos and an ESC from hobbyking is on the list in the future if all goes well initially. 

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The stock ESC does permit lipos, it just doesn't warn you when they are about to run flat.

An external lipo alarm can help with this, or a lipo cut-off switch. The former beeps at you when the battery is about to run flat, the latter shuts the car down.

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Believe i have an alarm laying around at home. The cut offs seem to cost Close to half of what an hobbyking ESC costs.

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7 hours ago, DK308 said:

Lastly let me add a few observations regarding servos, lipos and chargers. Get a low profile servo if you can. You might like the added room it will provide for your electronics in the chassis. This can become particularly handy if you want to upgrade the ESC down the line as some aftermarket ESC's take up more space than others.

 

If not wanting to spending a lot of money, I would recommend against low profile servos unless the buggy requires it.  What I've experienced, is that the lower costs low profile servos are very fragile and/or not designed for offroad use.  I've recently been through 3 brand name low profile servos and I'm getting ready to finally pay good money for a good one.  Basically, I have spent now on low profile servo's. (in USD) $60, $75, $70...  I'm now going to go ahead and buy a quality one and spend about $120.  I originally didn't want to spend that much on a servo.

 

The reason I bring this up is that very good normal size servos sell for the price of the cheap low profile servos and work extremely well.  This is the reason I don't recommend low profile servos unless you have to have one.

 

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On 5/14/2019 at 12:40 PM, Cephas said:

Hi

I am relatively new to RC too built a Lunchbox as my first time at Xmas, just recently built a basher. Went with Juggular’s option because of the metal gears etc, admittedly I have done some homemade mods. 

1C8847C7-08EC-4D87-9446-501B4C93AEB5.jpeg

5431C14C-222B-4AC2-A725-ED748165ADF3.jpeg

F2C93AC2-4DE8-4C00-A631-B0973AC8BAE1.jpeg

lol... I feel like a bat looking at the world upside down...

To a bat, that bug would look delicious too.  

DSYS1NF.jpg

 

 

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9 hours ago, TurnipJF said:

In my experience, a hard steel pinion doesn't wear out the spur prematurely! If anything, it prolongs its life.

A soft pinion wears its teeth to a shark fin profile which places uneven pressure on the teeth of the spur gear, accelerating its wear. The metal particles that wear away from the pinion mix with the gearbox grease, turning it into a grey sludgy grinding paste which also accelerates wear.

I have seen a case of aluminum-sludge in a used Manta Ray.  It was bad.  

The pinion wasn't meshed 100%, so you can see the ledge made by what's not worn out.  

qdIZjyY.jpg

 

I'm running all others with aluminum pinion (unless they come with a steel), and they seem fine.  Granted, (1) I don't go full reverse, and suddenly jerk forward, trying to wheelie.  (2), my motors are generally at the level of Sport Tuned.  And (3), I use teflon grease that seems to prevent wear better than ceramic grease.  

If Turnip says most aluminum pinions suffer the fate of becoming a sludge, I believe him.  The pinion in the photo had gray-goo all over it.  

So if you have a fast brushless motor, but you are not using Teflon grease... definitely go with a steel pinion.  Nylon gears are tough.  Steel gears does wear down nylon gear less, because it does not produce the aluminum-sanding-paste.  

But if you are sticking with a silver can like DK308 suggested, you can get away with an aluminum pinion until you upgrade.  

[For those who want Teflon grease... I am using "Labelle 106."  It's about the same consistency as Tamiya's ceramic grease.  If you are running 380 motor on your Grasshopper, or even a 540 silver can, Teflon grease won't make a difference.  If you have a Sport Tuned, or a brushless, PTFE (Teflon) would start to make sense.]  

 nB5WB6D.jpg

 

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5 hours ago, Mahjik said:

 

If not wanting to spending a lot of money, I would recommend against low profile servos unless the buggy requires it.  What I've experienced, is that the lower costs low profile servos are very fragile and/or not designed for offroad use.  I've recently been through 3 brand name low profile servos and I'm getting ready to finally pay good money for a good one.  Basically, I have spent now on low profile servo's. (in USD) $60, $75, $70...  I'm now going to go ahead and buy a quality one and spend about $120.  I originally didn't want to spend that much on a servo.

 

The reason I bring this up is that very good normal size servos sell for the price of the cheap low profile servos and work extremely well.  This is the reason I don't recommend low profile servos unless you have to have one.

 

What servos were you using? USD 60 - 75 doesn't fit my definition of cheap. I have 2 Savox 1251MG which are about USD50 and still going strong in my offroad buggies after a couple of years and I bought those secondhand. My Trackstar TS-D99X USD22 low profile servos are fine in my onroad cars after a year, and a guy at my offroad club has used the same one for a couple of years without issue.

I have S3003 in my TT02Bs, not great performance but almost 3 years of abuse at the hands of kids and still going strong

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8 hours ago, Mahjik said:

 

If not wanting to spending a lot of money, I would recommend against low profile servos unless the buggy requires it.  What I've experienced, is that the lower costs low profile servos are very fragile and/or not designed for offroad use.  I've recently been through 3 brand name low profile servos and I'm getting ready to finally pay good money for a good one.  Basically, I have spent now on low profile servo's. (in USD) $60, $75, $70...  I'm now going to go ahead and buy a quality one and spend about $120.  I originally didn't want to spend that much on a servo.

 

The reason I bring this up is that very good normal size servos sell for the price of the cheap low profile servos and work extremely well.  This is the reason I don't recommend low profile servos unless you have to have one.

 

I must say that I cannot recognize any of those issues. I run low profile servos every time I can. I have cheap Turnigy etc. servos as well as more pricy Savöx style stuff. None of them have failed as of yet. I will also concur with Jonathan that the prices you post are not exactly cheap servos. 

I tend to find that more often than not, people who destroy lots of servos do so, because their endpoints are not.set correctly. Not saying that's your issue, just pointing it out. If you have destroyed three different servos, the case may be that something in your setup is overloading the servos. If low profile servos were generally weak and unreliable, I don't think so many racers would use them.

I will definitely stick to my guns on this one and say that a low profile servo is a good, compact and light choice for a TT02B. Would I use one in a Arrma Nero or in a 45" FE boat? Absolutely not, but that's why the world gave us the ever so lovely Sav√∂x SB-2290SGūüėé

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12 hours ago, Don79 said:

Thanks for the advice!

I did not think that motor was sensored which I believe is required with the stock ESC. And the ESC doesn't permit lipos as far as I've read so I guess Lipos and an ESC from hobbyking is on the list in the future if all goes well 

12 hours ago, TurnipJF said:

The stock ESC does permit lipos, it just doesn't warn you when they are about to run flat.

The former beeps at you when the battery is about to run flat, the latter shuts the car down.

 

This is why I tend to just order a Hobbywing Quicrun ESC from the start. You can't always hear the alarm, but the built in cutoff in the Hobbywing actually actively protects your packs. So will an external cutoff switch, but I like to keep the electronics installed as simple and clean as possible. Fewer connections and less wire means fewer chances of something going wrong spoiling your day of RC fun.ūüėČ

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On 5/15/2019 at 8:50 PM, Juggular said:

I have seen a case of aluminum-sludge in a used Manta Ray.  It was bad.  

The pinion wasn't meshed 100%, so you can see the ledge made by what's not worn out.  

qdIZjyY.jpg

 

I'm running all others with aluminum pinion (unless they come with a steel), and they seem fine.  Granted, (1) I don't go full reverse, and suddenly jerk forward, trying to wheelie.  (2), my motors are generally at the level of Sport Tuned.  And (3), I use teflon grease that seems to prevent wear better than ceramic grease.  

If Turnip says most aluminum pinions suffer the fate of becoming a sludge, I believe him.  The pinion in the photo had gray-goo all over it.  

So if you have a fast brushless motor, but you are not using Teflon grease... definitely go with a steel pinion.  Nylon gears are tough.  Steel gears does wear down nylon gear less, because it does not produce the aluminum-sanding-paste.  

But if you are sticking with a silver can like DK308 suggested, you can get away with an aluminum pinion until you upgrade.  

[For those who want Teflon grease... I am using "Labelle 106."  It's about the same consistency as Tamiya's ceramic grease.  If you are running 380 motor on your Grasshopper, or even a 540 silver can, Teflon grease won't make a difference.  If you have a Sport Tuned, or a brushless, PTFE (Teflon) would start to make sense.]  

 nB5WB6D.jpg

 

You're making a very good point. I think I will try and go back to steel on my rigs with nylon spurs. I've gotten in the habbit of changing alu pinions when they showed signs of wear. I suppose that's what has saved my spurs.

The PTFE grease is great stuff. You should also give white lithium grease a try. That's what I'm currently using and I'm really liking it.

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4 hours ago, DK308 said:

You should also give white lithium grease a tryÔĽŅ. That's what I'm currently using and I'm really liking it.

I'm looking at Permatex 80345 White Lithium (because it's cheap, I might give it a try). 

But do you have any specific brand you'd recommend?  

 

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I saw most Lipos off of Hobbyking came with hxt-connectors which I am not very familiar with so figured I'd ask. This might be the dumbest thing asked here but there has to be one of those as well :D

Ok the ESC, would you then install a connecter the opposite way, i.e. reverse make and female in order to be able to connect the battery? I don't even know if my question makes sense but I'll try to elaborate if it does not.

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17 hours ago, Jonathon Gillham said:

What servos were you using? USD 60 - 75 doesn't fit my definition of cheap. I have 2 Savox 1251MG which are about USD50 and still going strong in my offroad buggies after a couple of years and I bought those secondhand. My Trackstar TS-D99X USD22 low profile servos are fine in my onroad cars after a year, and a guy at my offroad club has used the same one for a couple of years without issue.

I have S3003 in my TT02Bs, not great performance but almost 3 years of abuse at the hands of kids and still going strong

 

13 hours ago, DK308 said:

I must say that I cannot recognize any of those issues. I run low profile servos every time I can. I have cheap Turnigy etc. servos as well as more pricy Savöx style stuff. None of them have failed as of yet. I will also concur with Jonathan that the prices you post are not exactly cheap servos. 

I tend to find that more often than not, people who destroy lots of servos do so, because their endpoints are not.set correctly. Not saying that's your issue, just pointing it out. If you have destroyed three different servos, the case may be that something in your setup is overloading the servos. If low profile servos were generally weak and unreliable, I don't think so many racers would use them.

I will definitely stick to my guns on this one and say that a low profile servo is a good, compact and light choice for a TT02B. Would I use one in a Arrma Nero or in a 45" FE boat? Absolutely not, but that's why the world gave us the ever so lovely Sav√∂x SB-2290SGūüėé

 

The first one was a Savox SC-1251MG.  If you do some searches on that one, you'll see similar reports with that servo stripping gears with heavy use.  Latest was a Muchmore CDS10 (just crap from the start).  I'll have to look the other one up I bought and tried.  This is for an Xray XB4 which is track driven so it's exposed to harsher conditions than if someone is running their car without them flying through the air every 15 seconds.  ;)  However, that does show that under heavy abuse, these just don't hold up.  I am ordering a Protek 160T to move forward.

 

FWIW, the Savox SC-1258TG is working flawlessly in the DN-01 which is used on the track as well.  Other things have broke at the track with that buggy, but not the servo.  I also have the Savox SC-0251 in my Hotshot but it never sees anything remotely close to an offroad race track.

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13 hours ago, Don79 said:

I saw most Lipos off of Hobbyking came with hxt-connectors which I am not very familiar with so figured I'd ask. This might be the dumbest thing asked here but there has to be one of those as well :D

Ok the ESC, would you then install a connecter the opposite way, i.e. reverse make and female in order to be able to connect the battery? I don't even know if my question makes sense but I'll try to elaborate if it does not.

Well simply put, in order to connect a male plug, you need a female and wise versa.

Here's where things get interesting. People do things in all kinds of ways, and each have their preference. 

I would reccomend that you choose one type connector and stick to that. It will of course mean that you sometimes have to solder new connectors on new packs, but it's easily done and not an issue imo.

Also, many aftermarket esc's do not come with connectors on, so they need soldering anyway.

Choose a connector that is common, gives good connection, can handle being connected and disconnected and so on.

I can't tell you which connector type is the best, most have their pros and cons. But there are a few that I think should be avoided like the plague. The latter are, Deans T connectors, EC3, and Tamiya style connectors (flame retardant suit onūüėܬ†)

In your case, I'd go with either XT90 or XT60. Very rugged and very common. I personally use XT150 on everything, but that's because my packs see use in everything from a Lunch Box to stupidly overpowered 1/8 scale rigs and boats. 

But the XT90 comes on a bunch of models and batteries, and you can purchase adapters, splitters and loads of other things for XT90 or XT60 use. And they will handle being connected and disconnected better than a lot of other connector types. 

The HXT is not a bad plug per se, but I don't think they are as good as XT90 and XT60.

At the end of the day the most important thing is that your gear is compatible with itself. Take the time to install the same connectors on everything. Nothing more annoying than wanting to run your other rc just to realize that the fack with the connector that only fits that rc, is either flat or damaged.

These are what I'd consider.

XT90

XT60

EC5

HXT

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17 hours ago, Juggular said:

I'm looking at Permatex 80345 White Lithium (because it's cheap, I might give it a try). 

But do you have any specific brand you'd recommend?  

 

Sometimes I use the Permatex, but I really like the WD40 high performance white lithium grease.

https://wd40.co.uk/specialist/high-performance-white-lithium-grease/

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1 hour ago, Don79 said:

I was thinking about these for example.

https://hobbyking.com/en_us/hxt-4mm-gold-connector-w-pre-installed-bullets-10pcs-set.html

I guess these act as male/female depending om how you solder? Maybe I'm confusing myself here.

Those are confusing.  Having soldered wrong polarity more than once, I wouldn't get confusing ones.  And they are rated for 93A.  Even XT90 is a bit of an overkill, unless you are running a 550 sized 5.5t brushless on a 1/3 sized mega-buggy.   

 

XT60 is rated for continuous 60A. (The ancient Tamiya plugs were designed for 1A, but might withstand up to 2A)  So for "hobby" purposes, XT60 should be 30 to 60 times more than what Tamiya thought was enough. (with lipo, not anymore)  I ended up buying about thirty XT60 from Amazon, and these are very consistent.  

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B01ETROGP4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

Deans T-plugs are so tiny, you can't get a good grip on them.  But I think the new insulating caps might make it easier now.  T-connectors are also rated for 60A continuous.  

https://hobbyking.com/en_us/t-style-connector-male-female-with-insulating-caps-10-pairs.html

 

Aside from Tamiya plugs, XT60 or T-connectors are two most common connectors.  

 

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9 hours ago, Don79 said:

I was thinking about these for example.

https://hobbyking.com/en_us/hxt-4mm-gold-connector-w-pre-installed-bullets-10pcs-set.html

I guess what I am asking is that it does not matter if you have the female or male on the ESC as far as bullet connectors go and with these HXT you basicly have one of each?

No you're understanding lt right. The problem is that they tend to wear quickly, and the length of the connector can be really annoying.

The Deans are not only annoying because they are tiny, they are also incredibly prone to wear and sparking. I have absolutely no idea how that garbage became so popular. Stay away. 

The XT90 is indeed overkill for what you're doing. But on the other hand they will also mean that if you find down the line that you want to try your hands on a larger RC such as an Arrma Kraton 6S or Typhon 6S etc. you will not find yourself soldering new plugs on things once more.

The reason why I suggest the XT90 is because it will mean that you're pretty much set for all but the most powerful large scale models that needs either XT150 or 8mm bullets. 

I have used these in the past and they are pretty sweet connectors.

https://hobbyking.com/en_us/xt90-s-anti-spark-connector-2pairs-bag.html

If you think the XT90 will be more than you will ever need, go with the XT60. They are better than the HXT and a badword of a lot better than Deans.

https://hobbyking.com/en_us/xt60u-xt60-upgrade-male-female-5-pieces-each.html

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Deans (T) connectors are not to everyone's tastes, but I like them, for the following reasons:

Once plugged in, they stay together firmly. As others have pointed out, this does make them a bit difficult to unplug at times, but it also means that they don't come undone by themselves while running. (That happened to me with XT60s.)

They are very widely used. This means that, while they can be a bit tricky to solder, the chances of having to solder them is reduced as you are likely to be able to order your components with them pre-fitted. It also means that I can lend/borrow equipment from my clubmates as they use the same connectors. 

They are physically very small. Yes, this might make them a bit more difficult to work with, but this also makes them easier to fit under compact bodyshells. Not a concern for touring cars, but potentially useful for some buggies, and very useful for the F1s that I race. 

As for wear and sparking, not an issue in my experience. They are sturdy and easy to clean, and no more prone to sparking than any other connector. It is just easier to see the spark as it is not hidden by the plastic parts as it its with many other connector systems. 

 

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8 minutes ago, TurnipJF said:

Deans (T) connectors are not to everyone's tastes, but I like them, for the following reasons:

Once plugged in, they stay together firmly. As others have pointed out, this does make them a bit difficult to unplug at times, but it also means that they don't come undone by themselves while running. (The happened to me with XT60s.)

They are very widely used. This means that, while they can be a bit tricky to solder, the chances of having to solder them is reduced as you are likely to be able to order your components with them pre-fitted. It also means that I can lend/borrow equipment from my clubmates as they use the same connectors. 

They are physically very small. This makes them easier to fit under compact bodyshells. Not a concern for touring cars, but potentially useful for some buggies, and very useful for the F1s that I race. 

As for wear and sparking, not an issue in my experience. They are sturdy and easy to clean, and no more prone to sparking than any other connector. It is just easier to see the spark as it is not hidden by the plastic parts as it its with many other connector systems. 

 

That's what makes a forum great. Different experiences shared by the users. ūüôā

I have had Deans come apart several times in the past as they became loose as they wore. Never experienced that with an XT.

I think the hey-days of the Deans as standard plugs are beginning to come to an end. More and more models now either feature EC5 or XT6/XT90 connectors - at least that's what I tend to see.

A lof of batteries are now supplied with XT60 and XT90. I would actually go as far as to say that many brands are now supplying more XT and HXT equipped stuff than Deans. 

As for the compatibility. There's a slew of small and compact adapters available. So in my book, that's rarely an issue.

Lastly, I've yet to see a situation where a Deans would fit but an XT60 would not. XT90 maybe, but that would probably only be in very few select models where space is next to non-existent. 

As I mentioned, I use XT150 all across the board, and so far they fit in most things. I don't run F1 so can't comment on that, but they fit in all my onroad and offroad models going from my TRF503 track car to my TT02B fun runner. 

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