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Uranium

replacing an ESC connector safe?

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hi. if you saw me in the main subforum, i asked on how to replace the insulator on an ESC. so i went ahead and did it. i also figured that i might as well replace the actual connector, but that was easier said than done to me.

20190521_174843.thumb.jpg.62424bb31e9979418415bcd3c4043e47.jpg

it's not entirely clear, but the copper is a bit messy. i also cut an insulator in half and taped it because i was stupid enough to forget that...is it safe? i really don't need a gigantic flame bursting out of nowhere if its dangerous. would i be better off replacing the entire ESC? this was a foolish post, but i just want to make sure nothing bad happens. thank you!

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No alarm bells are ringing looking at your photo. As long as the connector isn't bent out of shape and is making good contact, you should be fine. The insulation is mostly there to prevent shorts between the two motor wires which could blow the ESC, and it appears adequate for the task. 

If you are concerned, you could omit the connectors entirely and solder the ESC wires straight to your motor. This is often neater as well as being more efficient from an electrical standpoint. I do this with all of my race cars, except those running Speed Passion brushless motors which have built-in bullets. 

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The main risk is the tape coming off, tearing or wearing through and allowing the exposed metal connector to short to another exposed wire/connector. A short could damage your ESC, battery and/or the wire could get very hot, melt or start a fire due to a huge short circuit current flowing in it. I would use some thicker tape like electrical tape, duct tape or gaffer tape rather than the thin sellotape.

A neater solution than tape would be to slip some heat-shrinkable tubing over the connector and shrink it down with a lighter or hairdryer. The tubing is also thicker so it provides better resistance to abrasion. Buy the size of tubing that just barely fits over the connector in it's un-shrunk state.

A few messy strands of copper won't hurt anything, as long as they are inside the insulator and the wire is securely crimped and/or soldered in the connector so it can't be pulled out.

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