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Powered Screw Drivers

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So while disassembling my TNX for cleaning/rebuilding I figured it's time to look into some power drivers.  Picked this up for cheap:

kfVTDGx.jpg 

Basically was looking for an inexpensive low-power, light-weight driver with torque adjustment.  This seemed to fit the bill.

Found out the lowest torque setting was way too torquey.  In other words, I'd be stripping plastic all day with this thing.  Otherwise, it's decent quality for the money ($17) and I can add it to my wife's tool bag for around the house.  The search continues.

The Vessel JIS bits are great though!

Thinking about trying this next:

tj4o1NT.jpg

Based on this review:

 

 

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I use a ryobi 4v lithium unit, the torque settings are perfect for rc cars. The lowest setting it unlikely to strip any reasonably new plastic. Been using it for 3 years, 30+ new builds, multiple rebuilds. Still going strong.  It wasn’t particularly cheap though from memory. 

90BA32A8-CB0C-48EC-AED6-A1383B38FEDF.jpeg.bdb8f6bcc1fe7c00b064d1aeffa8d8ca.jpeg

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Do you ever run into issues with screws getting hot and melting the plastic, making the holes loose?  Even hand-tightening some screws with a ratcheting screwdriver I've felt the plastic go soft before, so I've slowed down my fastener removals and installations.  This seems to be an issue with certain plastics more than others.

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7 minutes ago, speedy_w_beans said:

Do you ever run into issues with screws getting hot and melting the plastic, making the holes loose?  Even hand-tightening some screws with a ratcheting screwdriver I've felt the plastic go soft before, so I've slowed down my fastener removals and installations.  This seems to be an issue with certain plastics more than others.

With my Dewalt drill.  This small gun I got is 200/400 rpm.   At 200 rpm, it shouldn't be an issue?  I'd love to find a small, cheap, variable speed drill but, as far as I can tell, they don't exist.

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I have a very cheap Performance Power screwdriver from B&Q.  I think it was < £10.  I never use it for RC builds, firstly because I have no JIS bits and secondly because I don't really see the point.  Even with slightly arthritic fingers, the majority of screws don't give me any trouble.  Unless you're racing to complete a car for a build-and-drive event, why rush?  Use a hand-held screwdriver and feel what the plastic is doing.

The main RC-related thing I do use it for is link screws in my custom-built crawlers.  Screwing 30mm of M3 machine screw in and out of 10mm delrin plate is tough on the fingers and wrists but my cheapie B&Q jobbie does it flawlessly.

I also use it for drilling plastic.  It's a single speed driver and it's very slow, way slower than my cordless electric drill at its slowest speed, and it's also much, much lighter, and therefore easier to control.  I have 2mm, 2.5mm and 3mm drill bits on hexes so I can plug-and-play without a chuck.  For plasticard sheel, styrene mouldings, lexan and ABS bodies, which tend to melt if drilled too fast and/or are too small or flexible to clamp to a surface, the hand-held is the perfect too for a semi-precise hole.

If I need real precision I use the bench drill, but it can be a little too fast for plastic and probably isn't quite as precise as it was when it was made 60+ years ago.  The chuck has a bit of a wobble and it vibrates from having an ancient drive belt left installed while it was dry-stored for a while after its former owner passed away.

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14 minutes ago, Mad Ax said:

I have a very cheap Performance Power screwdriver from B&Q.  I think it was < £10.  I never use it for RC builds, firstly because I have no JIS bits and secondly because I don't really see the point.  Even with slightly arthritic fingers, the majority of screws don't give me any trouble.  Unless you're racing to complete a car for a build-and-drive event, why rush?  Use a hand-held screwdriver and feel what the plastic is doing.

I'm with you as I've never felt the need for one until I started removing the first few (of dozens) tapping screws :D

I may never actually use one to install screws though.  Especially if f I can't find one with a low enough torque setting where I don't have to worry about eyeballing the screw and stopping right before it gets snug.

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I've been using the Bosch IXO since 2009. Always been happy with it, never had a problem and still works great until now.

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I also use a Bosch IXO, but with the torque adapter: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bosch-IXO-Torque-Setting-Adapter/dp/B00JZI0X50/ref=asc_df_B00JZI0X50/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=226606326869&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=6355538408912982800&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9045064&hvtargid=pla-420005322866&psc=1&th=1&psc=1

Have had problems with a previous electric driver getting plastic too hot, so tend to take my time and if possible rotate round the screws in each step to put all of them in part way before going back and finishing them off (or with the longer screws sometimes 3 or 4 times). But I also now do that if I use a normal screwdriver too just to be on the safe side.

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For RC workbench I don't like the pistol type, I prefer the baton style of screwdriver... which are getting impossible to find nowadays :( 

More importantly when off-power I want the bitchuck to stay put with the screwdriver body so I can handtighten the final amount. Any driver that lets the bitchuck able to be turned when torqued manually is useless for RC wrenching. 

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By far the best electric screwdriver I've ever tried and excellent for working on Tamiya models. Not cheap, but in a direct comparison with the Bosch Ixo it wasn't difficult to understand why. If you can live without the Tamiya logo and get long JIS-bits separately, the screwdriver itself is a rebadged and recoloured Makita DF010D, which can be found for roughly 1/3 of the price.

https://www.tamiya.com/english/products/74089screwdriver/index.htm

 

top.jpg 1.gif

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Now that is cool!  And very expensive!

 

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Huh, it's strange to me that so many people use power screwdrivers on RC cars. I never have. I guess I've never seen a need to "speed up" work on them.   And I'd never trust one to assemble something. Suddenly all the comments over the years about stripped holes and cracked plastic parts make sense...

But then, I don't use an air wrench on 1:1 cars either, unless I just can't break a bolt loose any other way. And again, never for assembly.

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I am a believer of @Pintopower's method.  Only for unscrewing.  Never for tightening.  

Even when hand-tightening, I use his method of backing out a turn, feel the screw clicking on to the thread in the hole, and then tighten.  Otherwise, I could cross-thread.  

For some reason, things @Juls1 recommended always worked out for me.  This time, however, I must say, "aha! I beat you to it, because I bought mine like 8 years ago!"  My older model Ryobi was $23 or so, not too expensive.  My guestimation is that on the weakest setting, it might not screw all the way on 30-40% of Tamiya screws.  On the strongest setting, it's still weaker than torquing hard with your hand.  It's good for RC. But as I've said, I only use it to unscrew.  

120ilF9.jpg

Power tools lack the "feel."   Power setting "4" on the Ryobi 4V could work fine for the Grasshopper, but I could hear the dreaded "CRACK" sound on a shell of the Blackfoot.  If you do it by hand, you'd feel the resistance before it happens.  If you crack it by hand, you learn how strong that resistance was for that type of plastic.  You can learn from it and adjust.  Power tools don't give you that feel.  Also, even if you unscrew by hand, the screw can get very hot from the friction (usually M3 machine screws on tight holes, not tapping screws).  Any faster, it could melt the plastic.  My hand, on the other hand (I don't mean the left hand when I said 'on the other hand')--cannot melt anything but chocolates (ice creams too, but I stopped eating sugar anyway...).  

 

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I used to think they were unnecessary until I bought an 8th scale car. I borrowed one during the build if my HB D817 and then was doing some maintenance after the first race meet and stopped halfway through and went and bought one.

I have this one and so far so good. It was the cheapest but still had a 2 year warranty and it swivels so can be a pistol or straight type. It has 9 clutch settings and i leave it on the lowest for most stuff but need higher settings for some of the 8th stuff. 

https://www.bunnings.co.nz/ozito-3-6v-screwdriver-torch-with-charging-base_p06290559

The gold standard (at least over here) is the Hitachi, it costs about 4 times as much as the one i have but people have been using them for years.

I have found it useful for all my race cars, boty 8th and 10th, not so much the Tamiyas though which have softer plastic.

 

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There was a time i was pushing out ( quite litterly ) a lot of TT01's..

I resorted to using a Hitachi DS18DJL ( ehm.. but then the older type ) just to speed up the process of building TT01 chassis number ... XX

Kind of still feel quilty about it :p

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Can’t say I’ve ever really had a problem stripping holes with power tools, but I’ve been using them all my life, in 1:1 stuff being silly with power ratchet means ripping bolt heads off, so you quickly learn how not to do that! 

That being said, my ryobi screwdriver probably only does 60rpm, yes you could strip the hole but a little more care and attention it’s never a problem. Best practice is don’t use it if you can easily be distracted I guess. 

I have a friend who won’t use one, because he likes the feel and process of the hand screwdriver. Everyone has their own preference. 

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If time is short - e.g. for racing changes - then any of these are fine for unscrewing ... although I completely agree Hitachi are by far the best. 

Even then the delicate pressure needed to avoid accidentally stripping a head still needs care - esp in the heat of the moment !

For tightening, no clutch (no matter how adept) will ever spare ripped threads / heads given the tolerances we work to .... and materials in play.

So it’s a no for me. 

Personally, I love feeling when the right amount of torque just ‘pinches’ in my hand.

Its a key difference between amateur fun and XB :) 

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On 6/20/2019 at 5:22 PM, Mokei Kagaku said:

By far the best electric screwdriver I've ever tried and excellent for working on Tamiya models. Not cheap, but in a direct comparison with the Bosch Ixo it wasn't difficult to understand why. If you can live without the Tamiya logo and get long JIS-bits separately, the screwdriver itself is a rebadged and recoloured Makita DF010D, which can be found for roughly 1/3 of the price.

https://www.tamiya.com/english/products/74089screwdriver/index.htm

 

top.jpg 1.gif

This looks very like the Hitachi one I have 

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14 minutes ago, gizard said:

This looks very like the Hitachi one I have 

It's a Makita, but I can't exclude the possibility that it was also branded Hitachi.

I used to work for Hitachi Automotive and Hitachi is an enormous company involved in anything from nuclear plants and shinkansen trains to air conditioning and copy machines and has joint ventures and cooperations with a lot of other companies, so a Hitachi version of a Makita tool (or vice versa) is entirely possible. 

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this is the one I have:

https://www.metabo-hpt.com/es/us/main-navigation/herramientas?category=/herramientas/cordless/3-6-volt&amp;title=DB3DL2 3.6V Lithium Ion Screwdriver (1.5Ah)

I think from recommendation from here (TC) - certainly ideal power / torque settings for RC looks like the core might well be the same as you suggest - just external moldings differ slightly... ;) 

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55 minutes ago, gizard said:

this is the one I have:

https://www.metabo-hpt.com/es/us/main-navigation/herramientas?category=/herramientas/cordless/3-6-volt&amp;title=DB3DL2 3.6V Lithium Ion Screwdriver (1.5Ah)

I think from recommendation from here (TC) - certainly ideal power / torque settings for RC looks like the core might well be the same as you suggest - just external moldings differ slightly... ;) 

They do indeed seem to have a lot in common, and I found the Hitachi type branded as Hikoki and Dewalt too, in addition to Metabo, of course. However, the Tamiya/Makita has a 7.2V Li-battery and not 3.6V, so there got to be some differences apart from the external appearances.

Btw, noticed that just like the Bosch Ixo, there exists a pink "girl" version of the Hitachi too!

 

hitachi-db3dl2-japan-charger-electric-screwdriver-3-dual-lithium-battery-hitachi-db3dl2-canada.jpg

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Hi

I was looking for a more conventional 'normal' screwdriver, but powered, and I found this:

https://batavia.eu/product/tool/compact-grip-screwdriver/

It's pretty much the same dimensions as a screwdriver, but does the job very well. And the battery is charged using a normal USB cable.

There are other wonders on that site too, including a handheld chainsaw!!

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On 21 June 2019 at 2:22 AM, Mokei Kagaku said:

By far the best electric screwdriver I've ever tried and excellent for working on Tamiya models. Not cheap, but in a direct comparison with the Bosch Ixo it wasn't difficult to understand why. If you can live without the Tamiya logo and get long JIS-bits separately, the screwdriver itself is a rebadged and recoloured Makita DF010D, which can be found for roughly 1/3 of the price.

https://www.tamiya.com/english/products/74089screwdriver/index.htm

top.jpg

ooooh first kit I've seen that supplies 7mm box socket ;) 

At the track undoing/doingup wheelnuts is the main job; the 7mm box lives on tool 80% of the time. 

Only gets swapped out for 2mm hex or PH2 when there's a big teardown. But rarely happens as it'll usually be quicker to throw down the spare car instead. 

 

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