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Morning everyone, ive been painting a D90 hard body and the paint has reacted. I used Tamiya's fine surface primer then degreased with IPA and finally passed over with a low tack rag. Then I done a couple of coats with a Tamiya Ts gloss white.

 

Then this happened :(

 

Any help would be appreciated.

IMG_20190906_085108.jpg

IMG_20190906_085101.jpg

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where did you paint it cause it looks like where ever you have painted it their is either silicone of polish been used in the area

you have to strip it of as it looks like it gone down to the surface that is what i call "fish eyes" reaction 

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Yeah those are fish eyes, which are caused by surface contamination that the paint won't adhere to. Maybe the IPA or tack cloth cleaning steps left some residue that the TS paint doesn't like, or it got contaminated with some other type of overspray. Building up a series of very light mist coats before spraying a heavier coat can also help.

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I see what a pain, what paint pre cleaners do you guys use? Especially with acrylic paints? 

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After priming with T's fine surface primer, I just wash it in lukewarm water with a bit of dishwashing liquid, and leave it to dry thoroughly underneath an upturned plastic crate to protect it from dust.

Using tack cloths is risky because they can leave a stickyness on the surface that contaminants can stick to. The problem your pics show can also be caused by paint that isn't mixed very well.

I always shake the cans for several minutes, up to 5 or so, particularly in less than searingly hot weather, and stand the can in the sink with bath-temperature water about half way up the can for another 5 minutes.

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where about did you paint the shell.

all the hard body shells ive painted i have only washed with the washing up liquid and a sponge and only at the start before painting 

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Dumb question but did you completely open up the tack rag and then scrounge it back? Also was the surface completely dry before you tack ragged it. When i used to paint 1:1 that could sometimes cause fish eyes from the tack material. But other than silicone contamination it looks like you probably went pretty heavy on the paint with the solvents releasing mold release agent through the primer. 

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I fully opened the rag but went over lightly as to not to transfer contaminates. It was dry before that process. I went over with 2 light coats and it started to react then I thought F#*k it and carried on. Hanging my head in shame now, as its more work for me to rub it back. 🙄

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Only thing i can really think of is silicone contamination. Like someone mentioned above, where did you spray? 

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That's a bummer, hate it when that happens.  As others have said, definitely caused by contamination.  I always wipe doen my surface with isopropyl alcohol a few minutes before spraying and never have an issue.  Alcohol is great at getting rid of contaminants and gives a great surface to start with.  Just painted a Bruiser body today that I sanded a while back, just wiped it down with some alcohol, shot base then clear and it came out nice.

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as Mentioned 100% that is Silicone contamination, the thing to remember is that no matter how much you clean the body before you spray if the silcone is in the air/environment you're spraying in it will be attracted to the plastic body due to static charges.

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Happy Monday, Thanks guys fir your input 🙂 what grade paper should I use to flat this mess of paint back? Please 😚

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In order not to destroy the plastic or put really deep scratches in it i would wet sand with 400 grit. It is going to take a while. You can sand it dry too. Itll be a little faster but scratches will be a little deeper. Then prime really good after a really good cleaning. 

 

If you are feeling froggy you can start with 180 and work your way up. The trick is to let the sandpaper do its job and not dig or push into the surface. It will get the paint off exponentially faster but i do not recommend if you are not experienced in auto body repair. The scratches will be very noticable and will take some time and work to get out

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Ah thank you, maybe it's a little job for this weekend, it's very wet and windy here. Thank you again 

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Sand big flat areas like that supported with a block, not raw paper in your fingers.

Big pencil eraser or a cut down cork block is good. Those big nail buffer files that look like tongue depressors are good too to wrap your sandpaper around.

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