Jump to content
Apollo11

Clodbuster paint job gone pear shaped

Recommended Posts

Ok, here's the thing. I came to paint the shell for my clod build. So I did several coats of the mica blue, allowing them to dry between each coat. When that was done I cut out and fixed the masking stickers and a couple of plastic bags to protect the main section of the body from over spray. Then I did a couple of coats of the gun metal grey for the rear section. The bags, sticker on the tailgate and stickers on one side all came away ok. but peeling away the masking stickers on the left side they took away large sections of the mica blue paint with them, leaving nothing but the bare plastic shell behind and a few patches of blue where the masking clearly hadn't stuck quite as well.

Clearly I need to start from scratch all down the left side now. This leaves me with some questions, so some advice would be appreciated. Where the heck did I go wrong to start with? Do I need to remove the patches of paint that are left to start with a clean slate? If so, what's the best technique to get back to a decent surface? Would it have been worth starting with a primer before the blue? Where is the best place to source a replacement sticker sheet? I've find it listed in modelsport.com for about £16, but it's out of stock and I don't fancy waiting eons for them to get it to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before you paint the body it needs to be de-greased thoroughly as it will probably have some kind of mold release residue on it - suspect that might be your problem.

I always wash bodies in the bath with shampoo or bath foam and rinse with the showerhead then dry the body properly before painting.

That might sound crazy but it works. I use the bath because the bodies are too big for my kitchen sink. 

You should use primer before colour coat. Build up the colour with several fine coats to avoid runs.

You may find using sticky tape will strip the blue paint off if it has not stuck well or try some very fine abrasive paper.

Have you tried ebay for the sticker sheet ?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree with Tamiyabigstuff - probably mold release or grease. I always give them a really good dose of washing up liquid and lots and lots of water and then let them drip dry.

The other 2 big things to do as well are give the body a key, using a scotchbrite pad or one of those green kitchen scourer pads (before washing it of course) and give it a few coats of primer.

You may find that the paint will just peel off the rest of the body, so that might be the easiest to start with. Failing that, Mr. Muscle oven cleaner will probably get it off, or if you are somewhere near a B&Q they have a non-toxic paint remover that I've found works really well (just don't let it dry out on the body or it will ruin it)

this is the stuff: https://www.diy.com/departments/home-strip-paint-stripper-500ml/254572_BQ.prd

A few places to try for the stickers would be Tonystamiyaparts on ebay (not much he doesn't have or can't get), Jadlam toys or Timetunnel Models

Hope that helps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Apollo11 

I agree with all of the above and can add the following moving picture show. I nearly ruined a Blackfoot with several problems during painting. Eventually got it. See here 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I'd now like to make a little speech and it goes something like 'AAaargghh!!'! Why wasn't any of this mentioned in the instructions? Sounds like you're all absolutely right and I've wasted a load of paint, masking stickers and time. Oh well, all part of the process.

The good news is that as suggested I have managed to get what I needed at Time tunnel models: primer, mica blue and sticker sheet. While they're on their way, I can see how well the paint will come off and prep the surface properly. I also have an idea as to how I can cover the body while the paint is drying to protect it from dust and hair settling.

Thank you all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget primer. This etches the surface and makes the paint stick way better. Tamiya Fine Surface Primer is what I use, though any reasonably fine primer should work. (So not the stuff you'd use to paint a shed. :P )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jonboy1 said:

If you go to B&Q looking for the paint stripper, may I suggest going to the garden section and seeing if they have anything like this on sale:

https://www.diy.com/departments/plastic-2-tier-mini-growhouse/177872_BQ.prd

they make brilliant spray booths ;) 

This is a brilliant suggestion thank you. Although it has inspired me to think of alternative that should save £21 in beer tokens: I have a fairly large sturdy cardboard box kicking around waiting to be recycled. I should be able to figure out a way to re-purpose it for the role with judicious use of a stanley knife.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, GooneyBird said:

Don't forget primer. This etches the surface and makes the paint stick way better. Tamiya Fine Surface Primer is what I use, though any reasonably fine primer should work. (So not the stuff you'd use to paint a shed. :P )

Yes, done. I've ordered that along with the stickers and paint from time tunnels. Included a roll of masking tape to ensure I qualified for free delivery.

So it etches the surface? Fair enough, I sometimes wondered what the purpose of primer was.

Tad miffed this wasn't mentioned when I bought the kit, particularly bearing in mind I made a point of going out of my way to get it from a shop. A good example of a business missing an up sell opportunity to provide better value for the customer.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, geniusanthony said:

@Apollo11 

I agree with all of the above and can add the following moving picture show. I nearly ruined a Blackfoot with several problems during painting. Eventually got it. See here 

 

That is one smooth and shiny paint job at the end there! I now know the finish I have to aim for. so first coat, just a light fog?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Apollo11

I don't know if I ever covered it in the vid but my problems early on had to do with the incompatibility of the different kinds of paints, Eg, Urethane Enamel(which was the custom mix) and the Lacquer primer. Tamiya TS spays are to my knowledge all lacquer based, Which is great because they go on thin, dry quickly to a hard finish and are durable.

To answer your question, yes, thin coats always to avoid runs. Keep it clean and keying the surface (green Scotch-Brite pad) aids adhesion as well.

For those that didn't know, those 3M scotch pads come in 5 colors with 5 levels of abrasive. Quality auto store should carry them, worldwide I would presume... because 3M.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Apollo11 said:

This is a brilliant suggestion thank you. Although it has inspired me to think of alternative that should save £21 in beer tokens: I have a fairly large sturdy cardboard box kicking around waiting to be recycled. I should be able to figure out a way to re-purpose it for the role with judicious use of a stanley knife.

you're welcome :) I managed to get mine for £9 on sale so my beer reserves weren't unduly depleted ;) One issue with them is that the solvents etc do attack the plastic sheeting over time, so they look like they have leprosy after a year or so. I tried a cheap DIY alternative made from 1/4" thick plastic corrugated boarding (like that stuff used for "For Sale" signs) - again discovered in the tips page on here - all held together with gaffa tape. That works fine too, although it's a little wobbly at times, so it needs some work.

Cardboard box will work well, but wipe the inside well with a damp cloth to collect as much loose fibre first. It tends to shed a bit of fibre and the spray circulating inside will disturb it.

Oh, and warm up the cans in hot (but not boiling!!) water first - this will give you a finer spray. Again, get them nice and warm, not hot.

I'd always recommend using the same brand of paint/primer/gloss - one less thing to worry about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a bit of a bonus. I've done a load of hunting around on Ebay and Amazon and cannot find anything cheaper. With any bit of luck, due to the time of year I may find something on sale at B&Q.

Your point about dust and fibres made me realise: If I cut into a carboard box to fashion it into shape, that will send dust/debris everywhere. So a challenge to dampen that down. So I have discounted that option as it would be too fiddly making it dust free.

I've never heard that one about warming up spray cans before. I'll have to give that a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, geniusanthony said:

@Apollo11

I don't know if I ever covered it in the vid but my problems early on had to do with the incompatibility of the different kinds of paints, Eg, Urethane Enamel(which was the custom mix) and the Lacquer primer. Tamiya TS spays are to my knowledge all lacquer based, Which is great because they go on thin, dry quickly to a hard finish and are durable.

To answer your question, yes, thin coats always to avoid runs. Keep it clean and keying the surface (green Scotch-Brite pad) aids adhesion as well.

For those that didn't know, those 3M scotch pads come in 5 colors with 5 levels of abrasive. Quality auto store should carry them, worldwide I would presume... because 3M.

No, you didn't mention it. I did wonder what the original problem was. Funnily enough I was working with two paint brands as well. Someone else (cant' recall who, they had been recommended) in a slightly different shade of blue, then Tamiya's mica blue and gun metal grey on top. 

I'm familiar with scotch brite pads as we used to use them to clean weapons. I'm guessing that superfine would be the grade to go for?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Be aware paint solvent can get thru masking tape and soften/soil previous layers, especially annoying on metallics where the particulates get rearranged. Mask with multiple layers or add some paper or PVC tape for better insulation.

Pro painters also have low-tack masking tape if they must tape over freshly painted areas. I tend to grab frisket paper (aka transfer tape) for a fair bit of masking duties.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Apollo11 said:

No, you didn't mention it. I did wonder what the original problem was. Funnily enough I was working with two paint brands as well. Someone else (cant' recall who, they had been recommended) in a slightly different shade of blue, then Tamiya's mica blue and gun metal grey on top. 

I'm familiar with scotch brite pads as we used to use them to clean weapons. I'm guessing that superfine would be the grade to go for?

That's too bad, with my Blackfoot hardbody, I am fairly certain that the problem was incompatibly if not bad paint ( which sounds suspect ).

Here is a chart of the different pads just as an fyi

https://www.vikingtapes.co.uk/collections/3m-scotch-brite-hand-pads

 

You say you use them for weapons? I'm nearly retired from the military but can't say that I've ever though to use my auto body stash on them. Doesn't that remove blueing from the bolt and components?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right folks,

After having to put this on hold for a bit, I've made so more progress. I got a tub of the paint stripper from B&Q:  https://www.diy.com/departments/home-strip-paint-stripper-500ml/254572_BQ.prd

as recommended by Jonboy. Thank for the recommendation, that does work really well. Plus, as a bonus it is quite pleasant to use. The smell isn't too strong and goes on easily. I've got most of the paint off now, and will need to do a 2nd coat to get some of the stubborn bits off.

The trouble is, the instructions recommended a scraper which worked well for the most part. Unfortunately in a couple of places the edges of the scraper caused some scratches. My question now is, would sufficient layers of primer then paint smooth out these scratches ok, or have I ruined the body and would be better off starting again with a replacement one? (Not doing too well here, but I knew this was one area I would struggle with most).

When I have a moment, I could post photos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nooooo - don't start again because of scratches, they're easy to fix :) 

My favourite filler/putty is Milliput (blue)

it dries super hard and doesn't flake - otherwise, Squadron putty is very good too.

Apply filler to the scratch - less is more - then sand back with wet and dry (800 grit would be about right) (wet) until you get it nice and flat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been away for a couple of weeks so not progressed this for a while. As the scratches are very shallow, I reckoned a water based filler that can be painted on would be easiest to work with? For example this product available from Amazon: https://smile.amazon.co.uk/Vallejo-Model-Color-Plastic-Putty/dp/B000PHCNLC/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=Vallejo+Plastic+Putty&qid=1571170058&sr=8-1

That notwithstanding, I also notice that Tamiya produce putty and liquid primers. Is this because they are a load of rubbish, or people just don't prefer them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...