Jump to content
Trowa Jakuard

Tips for a First time Big Rig builder

Recommended Posts

I'm looking at getting a Globe liner kit, and would like recommendations for things like motors and which MFU to get. Thanks in advance :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would recommend the MFU 01 as it dose sound something like and it does suit the truck. Were as the MFU 03 is more continental trucks like Scania's and Volvos. The standard motor works well in the truck they tend to go a little fast though so a torque tuned motor might be better.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the trucking clan :)  The Globe is a great kit to build and drive, I bought mine as a "spare" that I could hand out to truckless friends at local meets, but it's become my favourite and the most high-spec of all my rigs.  Here's some things I learnt during my first exploration into the trucking world:

1) Read the instructions thoroughly first.  Many big rigs (especially Euro trucks) have plastic parts that need painting before assembly and in various different colours.  You don't want to have to stop a build for 6 months while you wait for painting weather like I did.  I think the Globe Liner is easier as most of the detail parts are chrome plated or already made in the right colour (black), but detail builders will add paint to parts before assembling anyway.

2) Decide on your MFU before you start building.  It's much easier to build the lights in than to add them later.

3) Think about what trailer(s) you might want as it will help you decide what type of MFU to get.

MFU options:

Tamiya MFU-01 - the Tamiya choice for this rig.  Comes with everything you need to get the rig running, except the fly lead for the trailer lights.  Works with the Tamiya remote trailer leg kit or the Tamiya tipper actuator or can be made to work with any single servo-operated accessory (winch, ramp, etc).  The downside is it's not really customisable.  If you don't like the truck sound, tough - that's all you get.  If you don't like the speedo profile, tough.  If you don't like the brake-once-for-brake, twice-for-reverse operation, tough.  It's not a bad unit but those drawbacks become apparent on a layout.  Also if you want to use multiple trailers you will have to unplug one trailer light kit manually and plug in the next one manually, which makes a complete nonsense out of the remote trailer leg kit.  There are bluetooth trailer light kits which take away the unplugging hassle (and the ugly fly lead) but you still have to manually re-bind every time you change trailer.  This is totally not a problem if you only have one trailer.

GT Power - cheaper version of the Tamiya.  I think they come with a variety of sounds and other stuff but I've never used them, they are getting good reviews.  IIRC there are several variants from basic ESC+lights to full ESC+sound+light+trailer options.

Beier - my personal fave, similar price to the Tamiya but you have to solder all the lights and speakers yourself.  Very customisable but you need to know your way around a wiring diagram, be able to calculate LED resistor values and be a bit of a computer enthusiast to work out the configuration tool.  Has an LED trailer light option so you can swap trailers without having to unplug things (provided you can work out how to hook up a remote trailer leg solution from various parts, as there is no off-the-shelf-option).

Servonaut - ultimate customisability but very expensive.  Loads and loads of pre-built solutions available like remote trailer legs and ramp actuators.

4) If you have a multi-channel radio with a 3-way switch, you can hook that up to the gear selector servo instead of the horizontal axis on the left stick.  In my experience this makes for a much nicer drive.  However, if using the Tamiya MFU, you can still plug the horizontal axis into the gear selector input on the  MFU because you'll need that for other MFU options.  Also a little-published feature is the Tamiya MFU changes the throttle response based on the selected gear, so you still get a sense of multi-gear driving even with the servo locked in a single position.  Generally we lock our rigs in 1st gear on our layouts because they are too small for anything else.

5) The standard motor is waaaay too fast.  My motor of choice is the Carson Poison.  I think it's 80 turns.  You'll get reduced top speed, much more torque and much longer runtimes.

6) If you run your rig at full speed in top gear on a grippy surface like asphalt, then give it a hard steering input, it will turn over, smash off all those fragile detail parts and scratch your beautiful paint job.  Take it steady.

7) Seek out a local club.  Trucking in company is much more fun than trucking around your driveway.  Then, before you go to your first meet, lay out some tape on the ground and practice reversing and parking - you'll look like less of a total novice when you arrive.  Also you'll be less likely to hit somebody else's truck.  Bear in mind some people spend thousands on their trucks and have very special paint jobs, you won't be thanked if you scratch something.

8) Related to the above - the 3-speed transmission has a lot of lash (i.e. lots of slop to take up between wheels and motor).  This means when you hit the brake, the truck will roll forward a way while it takes up the slack.  Take some time to get used to this so you don't hit things.  It's easy to get confused, brake once gently, then again harder when the truck doesn't stop, which makes the truck go into reverse, it shoots backwards and slams into whatever was behind you.  Been there, done that (and why I like the Beier module, where reverse is selected by another switch).

9) RC truckers are a weird bunch but very friendly.  Go make some new friends.

10) Watch this video.  It explains an easy way to get more steering on the US rigs.  It's not necessary if you just want to put the truck on a shelf but if you want to drive around an indoor layout in a cramped civic hall, you'll definitely want more steering.  Also you'll run out of space if you're driving around your home (unless you have a huge home).

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Semi's are fun! You can't have just one. I have many, to many. Nice write up by Mad Ax. The Globeliner is a nice pick, it has a feel of it's own, you'll like driving it. It's the shortest of American trucks, I think that makes fun to drive. Pick a different color than yellow (to many yellow out there) but your truck. Mine is yellow and is O.K .but just saying.

That being said, being your first truck, I would recommend the MFC-01. The MFC kit comes with everything you need to build the truck, simply.

DEFFINITLY install a ball bearing set. WAY to much work to do later!!  (2 different sizes)

I would recommend the leg kit and the extra" servo plate" for the coupler (fifth wheel) they make now for servo of the kit. It makes it look much better then the kit included one. This kit has 1/2 parts for truck and 1/2 for trailer and is easier also to do while building truck'.

I'm sure you'll get a trailer. If so get the light kit for the trailer now and install the plug end into truck and MFC. This can be done later but another piece of the puzzle. 

The stock motor is a bit fast but not terrible. It is a 27 turn. I feather the throttle and it is not bad, actually looks real. These aren't designed to be fast. A higher turn motor (as MAD Ax said) will make it slower. I personally have all stock in mine. Just driven in house not at a layout though.

There are a lot of options and extra after market stuff you can get to, it's fun! The more you can do during the build the easier it is. I hate taking the body off after because a lot of fragile pieces, paint, etc... But it is not the end of the world.

Have fun, take your time, you'll love it. Post pics. if you can, every one likes them.

 

Edited by Tamiya Fan 1
Missing word
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I had actually planned on Red for mine. I'm a bit Transformers fan and have spare Autobot decals so I was gonna do a G1 Prime :). So, I have to ask though, what would be a good radio to get for this?

Edited by Trowa Jakuard
forgot question
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of good advice. Build it with bearings. Take your time on the transmission. Braid the wiring looms of the MFC to keep them looking tidy

 

4670201D-3359-4D15-8ECA-30100E63E1F2_zps

 

0B58D90C-A60C-47A1-87F5-2AC0B667BA92_zps

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like your plan for a paint job. For a radio, I have always used Futaba since way back, so i have stuck with those over the years. Quality and pricey but work well. Many other brands work well also. If you want a Futaba, I recommend Futaba 4YF 2.4ghz (with out antenna). There are 2 kinds of 4YF, one being "newer style". Futaba makes Tamiya radio's.

Also the RC4WD steering links are recommended. They will make a huge difference in turning radius, as Mad Ax stated. I put this in all my trucks now.(a big difference) But I did not do all the filing, as in video. I just installed the ends instead of stock ones, same as instructions, and it will give you more steering in itself do to the offset it has. Maybe not as good as filing but is a major improvement over stock.

Hope this helps!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To run the Tamiya MFU, the instructions will tell you to use an older-style radio with trim sliders.  This is so you can operate all the MFU functions.  However it is possible to operate the MFU using a modern-style radio with programmable sliders provided it has a 'dual rate' function.  I used a Turnigy TGY-i6 radio (same as FlySky FS-i6 but with a different name on it) with my MFU-01 with no problems.  There are How Tos on Youtube about how to configure it, or post here if you're not sure.  For around £45 it's a cheap way to start trucking.

Another suggestion - the screws that hold on the body and various bits of trim are a bit ugly and detract from the scale realism.  Stainless button-head hex screws look a lot better.  Westfield Fasteners are a good supplier if you're in the UK.  The truck uses a mix of 6mm, 8mm and 10mm (all M3) for all the visible stuff so grab a bag of each if you want to improve the looks while building.

Also once lights are fitted the Globe Liner body can be a pain to remove.  A bit of trimming around the base plate can help.

Another note - Tamiya tell you it's not possible to fit the MFU and the interior at the same time, but this is not true.  The Globe Liner has enough space to get it all in if you're careful.  I made a false wall that stands behind the drivers seats, with all the MFU gubbins attached.  You have to do away with the speaker box - I glued my speaker to the back of the false wall, it sounds good enough inside the cab.

Another Globe-specific idea is to take the cap from a spray can and cut it in half to make a neat engine cover.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot to say about a radio. Most 4 channel (sticks) are made for airplanes. No problem using them but the throttle stick (left up/down) does not return to center on it's own like the other sticks. To make it easier you should install a "self center" for this stick. Most radio brands I think have them available. 

With that being said, I thought of a person/ store that caries a lot of parts for trucks. Bob from "Hobbyconcepts" (in US) has 2 things you should look into. Also has how to  video's on Youtube.

1) A "Flysky" radio that he modifies with the self centering stick.  (personally never tried) 

2) A speaker holder which puts the speaker up front above the servo's and transmission. Screws into place.  If installing interior. The Globeliner in itself is a big speaker box.

Something to look at.

If not installing interior, spray windows with Tamiya "smoke" or black paint so you don't see wires. Spray on the inside of windows, looks much better. OR make and install a wall behind the seats. (Mad Ax reference) I've used felt (once) and plastic sheet cut to size. Just a cleaner look. 

NOTE: Being your first rig this will be hard to tell at this time. I got hooked on semi's and bought a separate radio for each one. Then realized I should buy one radio for all, much easier, and less clutter. Now I have extra radio's not really needed. You won't know till you finish this one and see if you got bit by the Big Rig Bug. Just a thought. I use a Futaba 8J for all my rigs now. Yes you can use digital radio's with MFC. Most of all the functions will work. Even though MFC instructions say no. (manual from the old days) With My Futaba radio's I think everything works or I don't use that function? 

A lot thrown at you. If any other questions just ask.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tbh i would never use that dreaded smoke spray it just the worst 

i used 1.1 tint on my truck 

 

IMG_20200820_180852.thumb.jpg.59efe185d6c364b0b38bca303761ef49.jpgIMG_20200820_180842.thumb.jpg.8a4754b780eb33686adb4896cf90a2e8.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, I ended up getting the Globe liner, the MFC-01, The Trailer Light Kit, and the Electric Leg kit. I was curious on where I should mount the MFC, Speaker, and Vibration Unit in the cab. I have painted up the interior and got the driver also................

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's great you got all the pieces, they work well together. Mine got built with no interior. I used the MFC instructions layout for the pieces.(in the back of manual. Since You are going with interior it will be creative to do. plenty of room in the Globeliner though. The speaker could mount above servo's up front. If there is room use the speaker box. If not, just the speaker will be fine and body will be the box. MFC unit vertically behind the seats. Make a false wall behind the seats to hide the electronics. The vibration unit can mount any where it will fit. Maybe between seats or behind seats off to the sides. Screw the vibration unit down with all 4 screws if possible. Put battery in it's slot but no need to install battery holders. They just make battery install/removal hard to do.

For the MFC control board (switches, buttons, speaker knob), I mounted it in the chrome box, made brackets to hold it to top of frame between the back of cab and the 5th wheel. Leaving a little room (space) between it and the back cab cover so you can get it in and out easily. Makes switches accessible and looks like a tool box mounted.

A hint for you. When it is time to build the 5th wheel, use all 3 manuals. (MFC-01, Kit, Support leg, manuals together) It's confusing but will save you redoing it over and over as each manual has a change to the 5th wheel. Study all three and you will see what I mean. Makes it easier. Another hint: If the exhaust stacks give you trouble. (the bottom curved parts) They can  be cut shorter to make body easier to install/remove. (Just enough) I remember those being a pain but check it out for your self. Also Tamiya makes a "bling" servo coupler mount for the 5th wheel, makes it look better than the kit include one. (#56535) Bolt and play - say.

Other people who did the Globeliner  w/interior might have better ideas.

If you want extra lights (more than MFC) I would plan that as you go. You can NOT hook a lot of extra lights to the MFC (1-2 maybe) or it over loads it. There are ways if you decide to do so though.

Globeliner is fun to drive because it's shorter and the" boxiness" of it, makes a different experience.

Have fun, be creative, and make it yours. Ask if you have any questions.

Any questions along the way just ask.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What radio will you be using? If you don't have one yet consider more than 4 channel as this will give you options for extra lights or working accessories if wanted?

Just a thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So! I actually have the bodiless chassis rolling and going. I'm using my Radiolink RC6GS V2 that I use for my Dynahead and Clodbuster There are 2 3-way switches and a dial adjuster. I have the shift servo on 1 way and haven't set up the other 5th wheel servo. The thing actually has a little jumper cable for battery % to be displayed on the controller. Had to order a new floor panel though, Loc-tite melted the floor mounts :/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's good to have 6 channels for extras if you wish. Be careful with Loctite around plastic!! Use it sparingly and only on metal screw to metal piece. (not into plastic) At least parts are readily available. It sounds like you are making progress. The wire for battery %,  I think is telemetry, which is a nice feature. The MFC will shut down if battery voltage drops to far also.

Have fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welp. I've done goofed up big time. So, on the Globe Liner body, there are these prepped to be knocked out holes I now know are for an old MFC......................... not the current one. Crap. I guess "new style" doesn't mount through them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you talking about the holes on the back of the body? If so, no you shouldn't, only use the big one for for trailer lights plug. Those holes were for switches that yes the old style used to use. To fix these you can get a new body (easiest way) about $30 or do some body work (bondo, body filler) to repair it. The King Hauler and Globeliner were the first ones put out (American style any way) and the manuals might not be clear with the new stuff. (which is not that new really) Tamiya is this way? Any extra Tamiya pieces added to it RE: MFC, Support legs, etc., you really have to study all manuals for changes in parts and what to do. (NOT always clear)

Note: If you are installing the support legs, you have to use 3 manuals together to get all parts right on the 5th wheel or do it 3 different times. I found that very confusing on my first build, but worth it in the end. It gets easier?

Any way mistakes happen and it is not the end of the world. I would buy a new body for it. I just hope you didn't paint yet. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another thought. If you want to get rid of the plugged hole look (the way a new body looks, no holes punched) this would be your opportunity to do so with the autobody filler. More work but a better look in the end. If you want to go this route let me know and I'll get the brand name of filler most builders recommend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i just filled the indent holes on the back of my grand hauler except for the trailer plug one using this stuff

https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2334524.m570.l1313&_nkw=delux+perfect+plastic+putty&_sacat=0&LH_TitleDesc=0&_osacat=0&_odkw=rc+hard+shell+filler

if you have made the holes already then just stick a piece of hard plastic to the inside of the shell where you have made the holes and just fill away

IMG_20180603_104544.thumb.jpg.7a17bf4863f7634024024f2f032b7e64.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the exclusive High End Tamiya Rig Club!! 😁🎉🎉🎉  

I'm a bit worn out, Typing... But PLEASE come take a look at my Grand Hauler Thread in this Section. There's a LONG TIME, major bit of misinformation regarding High Turn Motors and "Torque". 😖 

In fact, look at ALL of our Threads in this Section! No better way to get ideas. I promise, there are some GORGEOUS Rigs by the great People in this Club!! 🏆💯

Globe Liner will be my next Rig! Always liked them. I hope you'll be posting lots of pictures, to wet our appetites to get our own!! 😊

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...