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  2. nbTMM

    replacing an ESC connector safe?

    The main risk is the tape coming off, tearing or wearing through and allowing the exposed metal connector to short to another exposed wire/connector. A short could damage your ESC, battery and/or the wire could get very hot, melt or start a fire due to a huge short circuit current flowing in it. I would use some thicker tape like electrical tape, duct tape or gaffer tape rather than the thin sellotape. A neater solution than tape would be to slip some heat-shrinkable tubing over the connector and shrink it down with a lighter or hairdryer. The tubing is also thicker so it provides better resistance to abrasion. Buy the size of tubing that just barely fits over the connector in it's un-shrunk state. A few messy strands of copper won't hurt anything, as long as they are inside the insulator and the wire is securely crimped and/or soldered in the connector so it can't be pulled out.
  3. Today
  4. nbTMM

    Quietest ESC / Motor combo?

    My TBLE02S whin This. If you can find one with 16kHz or higher drive frequency then the high pitched whine from the motor when at low throttle will be inaudible unless you have very good hearing! Both my TBLE02S and Trackstar GenII 120A escs must switch at only a few kHz because they emit a few kHz tone from the motor when at low throttle. The disadvantage of higher drive frequency is slightly lower efficiency of the ESC which will make it run hotter (probably by a negligible amount).
  5. mongoose1983

    Kyosho 1/18 Lamborghini Cheetah

    OOOOH, that is totally sweet. I want one!
  6. HuskerDu

    Questions about the TT02B

    Thanks for all the great info everyone. It's been quite some time since I posted, nearly a month. It took about 3 weeks just to get the car together, no snags in the kit, just wanted to involve my girlfriend as much as possible with the process. Aside from painting the body with plastic paint (oops!), it turned out pretty good, I'll definitely be getting an extra Plasma Edge shell, it's a looker. However there are a few things. The car doesn't track straight, at all. I'll admit, the Futaba 3004 servo isn't the best but, it all seems to come from the slop in the steering rack. That's going to be my #1 priority. If there's something I can do to fix this without spending money, great! If not, I do enjoy installing upgrades. It's also a bit too slow for my liking, not in the fun bouncy Lunchbox kind of way, but in a disappointing kind of way. Might throw in a sport tuned motor at some point, but still don't want to go brushless, I'd rather track down a DF03 in the form of an Ebay score or, better yet, the car coming back to market. Does seem as if they've all been discontinued currently. In any case, thanks again for all the info, I'll try keeping my eye on the diffs, I smothered them with the included AW grease and so far so good, but you never know.
  7. ACCEL

    Mad Max Fury Road War Rig build

    This is a really neat Pic i had sent to me today from Fast Eddy that had a booth there...................
  8. That's what I thought and I tried that, but didn't spin. I was suspecting my ageing digits for sure mate :-) I did check, I was using the 20T pinion from Tamiya 50356 which I believe is 0.6. Thank you. :-) Yes, I did put it back and used another motor but had the same issue. When I saw your post, it jogged my memory. A couple of weeks ago I added a Hop-up (Tamiya 54817 Motor Guard for Wr-02/gf-01) which included longer screws - 3x28mm. WR-02CB screws from the kit MG1 3x25mm. I used the original screws (3x25mm) without the motor guard and the gearbox spun as expected. Thank you so much! I then re-installed the motor guard (I think it was about 5mm or so think) with the longer screws (3x28mm) but the motor still locked. Scratched my head for a bit, then re-installed the motor with the motor guard AND the motor plate. All works as expected. Who would have known that motor plate would cause the motor to lock up?? I think it was only like 1mm or less thick. Respect to Tamiya for their precision design/engineering. Thank you all for the responses fellas, really appreciate it!
  9. Nicadraus

    FF03 Pro-R - My own version

    Bought a used kit with unused carbon reinforced chassis plus 2 extra stock chassis. The kit also comes with full carbon reinforced parts (suspension arms, knuckles, uprights, gearbox, CF deck stiffener, CF rear shock tower, CF battery holder,etc. So I replaced all stock plastic parts of my kit. I also replaced stock dog bone shafts to universal, gear differential, and front stabilizer, all of which also came with the kit. No more flexing of the chassis and is now very stiff.
  10. These kits have made their way to Canada! Thinking of grabbing the HKS, that was a wicked cool body back in the TA02 days. Too bad they didn’t re-release on a TA02 but the TT01E instead.
  11. Nicadraus

    So, What Have You Done Today?

    This... this... and this... more here... https://www.tamiyaclub.com/forum/index.php?/topic/89384-cc01-in-memory-of-my-dad/&page=2#replyForm
  12. So some parts arrived in yesterday... Rear suspension link, aluminum shock and suspension link mount, aluminum servo mount, bead-lock metal wheels. Installed... Aluminum servo mount... Bead lock wheels... Installed a fan for the motor. I fabricated a CF plate to mount the fan onto it... With the new wheels... Still waiting for new aluminum parts for the front suspension and YR aluminum steering set. Will update soon.
  13. Nicadraus

    The "postman Brought Me" Thread

    Some upgrades for my CC-01: Rear suspension link, aluminum shock and suspension link mount, servo mount, bead-lock metal wheels. Also bought these for spares and upgrade for my FF03.
  14. TurnipJF

    replacing an ESC connector safe?

    No alarm bells are ringing looking at your photo. As long as the connector isn't bent out of shape and is making good contact, you should be fine. The insulation is mostly there to prevent shorts between the two motor wires which could blow the ESC, and it appears adequate for the task. If you are concerned, you could omit the connectors entirely and solder the ESC wires straight to your motor. This is often neater as well as being more efficient from an electrical standpoint. I do this with all of my race cars, except those running Speed Passion brushless motors which have built-in bullets.
  15. TurnipJF

    Quietest ESC / Motor combo?

    I didn't know that. The only version we have available around here is the sensored one, along with the WP-10BL60, which despite the similar name, is a totally different ESC. Agreed!
  16. DK308

    Quietest ESC / Motor combo?

    You're right. However, the 10bl60 actually comes in a non-sensored version. Anyways, sensored brushless is as quiet as it gets.🙂
  17. Hibernaculum

    New Tamiya Monster Beetle Black edition.

    Yeah, that is totally true Mark, well put. I really love the idea of a model being a unique piece, unto itself, and created by the factory. With its own parts, character... and I don't mind if those things are not interchangeable with anything else. I probably like it even more, if that is the case. I like the collectibility of it. The special nature of it. The idea that it's not all just different bodies on the same car, over and over. Or that the same parts are reused over and over. But I totally see why this would be a pain if you're more inclined to modify and transplant, across models. I never look at a model and think "what if" I prefer the idea that it's a product all it's own. And I think this harks back to how I viewed the original 1980s cars, and how they were presented... Yes some parts were interchangeable across them, and eventually there was a hop-up line. But Tamiya did "silo" them a bit in those days. I liked the idea that a Fox gearbox belonged to a Fox, a Frog body was for a Frog, and so on. I like things to be separate. Distinct and unique. Because then, the fun becomes - how those individually unique and distinct cars race against each other - e.g. a Wild One and a Super Champ are utterly different cars. Yet they were designed just 3 years apart. And that's amazing to me. If they race, it's a battle of two completely different philosophies. And I love the idea of races between unique vehicles, each with different strengths and weaknesses. I have the same outlook in 1:1 motor racing. LOVE the idea of different teams competing using unique vehicles. HATE it when its a race of 20 identical cars and the only difference is the driver alone (who cares about drivers? lol).
  18. madmickmalone

    Kyosho Turbo Optima Re-Release!

    Just arrived from Japan
  19. madmickmalone

    The "postman Brought Me" Thread

    A bit of Kyosho Turbo Optima action
  20. Yesterday
  21. markbt73

    New Tamiya Monster Beetle Black edition.

    Interesting take on the Tamtech buggies, H... what I always disliked about them was how non-standard they are. They're sort of their own little ecosystem, completely separate from the rest of the lineup. They don't use standard servos, or motors, or batteries; they use smaller hardware; they can't use any parts from other Tamiya products. The comical buggies do, and that makes them a lot more accessible to me (and a lot of others, I would imagine). I have a TTG Hornet; I got it in a trade deal. It's in pieces right now, because I got bored with it in its standard form and I like to tinker with things. It may or nay not form the basis for a full-on custom scratch build, for which the smaller components are just about ideal. But using those components for something else is tricky, just because the parts only fit each other. Maybe it's the hot rodder in me, but one of my favorite things about Tamiya kits has always been the interchangeability of parts: with a screwdriver, a couple of extra parts trees, and some outside-the-box thinking, you can have an entirely new model. (Which is exactly what Tamiya did themselves for that new 4x4 Monster Beetle.) Which is why I like the re-res (or remakes if you prefer) so much: they're a great source of parts to tinker with, to try out weird ideas, without sacrificing a "real" one. And I think that's the biggest difference in our hobby philosophies: you tend to see the model as a whole, an end in itself. I see them that way at first... but then I start looking at the parts, and thinking, what if...
  22. Glad i am not the only one who has the dislike for these type of releases, and dont even get me started with the comical line lol
  23. hi. if you saw me in the main subforum, i asked on how to replace the insulator on an ESC. so i went ahead and did it. i also figured that i might as well replace the actual connector, but that was easier said than done to me. it's not entirely clear, but the copper is a bit messy. i also cut an insulator in half and taped it because i was stupid enough to forget that...is it safe? i really don't need a gigantic flame bursting out of nowhere if its dangerous. would i be better off replacing the entire ESC? this was a foolish post, but i just want to make sure nothing bad happens. thank you!
  24. Hibernaculum

    New Tamiya Monster Beetle Black edition.

    Re: 4x4 Monster Beetle, this appears to be along Tamtech Gear lines, without using that name. Only just caught up and saw it. Edit - After looking into it, it seems like an unnecessary rehash of the QD Monster Beetle, on a new chassis. At least when the Tamtech Gear buggies came out, there had never been a "miniature R/C Frog, Fox, Hornet, Hotshot, Rough Rider" before. So they were kinda novel for their time, and other companies were also doing the odd 1/16 buggy. Miniature Monster Beetle has already been done before. So the 4x4 Monster Beetle doesn't do much for me. Also, a miniature Wild Willy has been done before too... just not by Tamiya ( Tomy/Taiyo 4WD Army Commander - 1984)
  25. speedy_w_beans

    Quietest ESC / Motor combo?

    I'm not sure if any brushed ESCs are still available with programmable drive frequency (1kHz, 2kHz, 4kHz, 8kHz), but higher frequencies can help quiet down a motor some. Brushless is definitely quieter than brushed; some of my old Novak gear had programmable drive frequencies too.
  26. speedy_w_beans

    Displaying NIB kits (or even empty boxes)

    The office I had at my previous employer's facility had extra shelf space on the walls, so I had about 15 NIB kits on display there just to give the office some personality. These were mostly the key re-releases with classic box art (Sand Scorcher, Buggy Champ, etc.). I used to get questions, compliments, and laughs anytime I had a video call and people could see all these kits on display in the background. Here at home I've been storing NIB kits in my daughter's bedroom for a few years. She just finished college and married, so she's moving out permanently. My wife and I are going to convert her room into a storage unit and declutter most of the house. Fabric, sewing machines, NIB kits, NIP bodies, and other items are going in that room; we'll use some of the furniture for storage and probably invest in some more shelving units so it's all organized and off the floor. This will help both of us in our respective hobby spaces immensely, as we'll have a lot more table space to do actual work and leave projects out in the open.
  27. Hibernaculum

    New Tamiya Monster Beetle Black edition.

    The "Comical" buggies are, overall, a misfire to me. Pros: At least they were something "nostalgic" that wasn't just another remake of a classic model. Cons: They just look like toys for little babies. Still have fake brand decals. The fact Tamiya literally named them "Comical" over-emphasizes the fact they are "not normal" models, which is stupid. Marketing and impressions are important especially for adult collectors (which is the entire basis of Tamiyaclub). The Wild Willy (and Willys Wheelers, and Mitsubishi Pajero) worked in the 1980s because they were presented as normal models with "some stunt capability". Plus they didn't sacrifice detail and realism, to enable the stunt action. Wild Willy looks really exaggerated, but is still somehow also a heavy, realistic and interesting scale model. The Comical buggies are clearly trying to emulate those models. But they take it too far, and become too cutesy and caricatured. Even the driver figure looks like a cartoon baby. This is all just IMHO though - if some people like them and collect them, that's great. But much like the "wheelie tractors" a few years ago, they're not for me. Nice try at something different, but another misfire unfortunately. Why I liked the Tamtech-Gear buggies... Don't get me wrong, Tamtech-Gear wasn't perfect either (cons - fake decals + the cars chassis/suspension would have been far better if they were perfect miniatures of the 1/10 cars, they would also have been better as kits of course!)... But the pros were: They were something "nostalgic" that wasn't just another remake of a classic model, but a new chassis/design. Miniature versions of the classic 1/10 cars are a fun "souvenir" type idea and these were the best of the lot (there have been numerous products along these "miniature" lines, from Q Steers to Coffee Cup cars, and so on, and some have been popular) They looked good for what they were. They had a spare parts line that felt like a throwback to the past - e.g. the pink anodized optional parts felt specifically for the Tamtech-Gear Frog (much like the way Tamiya used to design certain spares specific to certain models) Beautiful packaging, despite being RTRs The above was enough for me to buy all of them. On top of all that, Fumito Taki was a designer on them. When I asked him some questions a few years ago, he said "The latest project I did from scratch would be the Tamtech Hotshot". It's great someone has finally done this, as it's been a very important factor in why I suspect Tamiya offers nothing I'd buy any more - they stretch themselves too thin. I'd rather they sold half the number of products - but produced a few "boutique" level nostalgic off road kits (with new designs, not just more boring remakes!) for collectors of our age group. With proper detail and no fake brand decals. There is absolutely no excuse for fake brand decals, when $7 Hot Wheels cars from the supermarket are covered in real sponsor logos. I have been banging on about this idea for years. Tamiya cannot seem to see that they are missing a market opportunity, by creating something genuinely new, scale, realistic, retro... but with no compromises, and in the style of the classic kits. Tamiyaclub would go nuts for it. But apparently it won't appeal to the little kids in Japan. So all we get are boring remakes and colour variants of remakes, for the "40-somethings". And that's lazy to me. Sorry for the rant - as you were! cheers, H.
  28. jupitertwo

    The "postman Brought Me" Thread

    Another GT2 with the Hot Wheels I hope to replicate
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